sitemap | help
Click here to access to our stories featuring images from our collections and related materials ranging from Unusual takes, voices to biographies and more. Click here to find a feature debate and other debates related to some of our subjects and topics found with the READ section, please note, you need to be a registered user to participate in debates Click here to browse or search for images and related materials.  Alternatively use the advanced search for more detailed queries. Click here to create your own web galleries using our image collections or to personalise your experience within Ingenious.  Please note that you need to be a registered user to work with the CREATE tools.  Go to the 'Register' link to utilise Ingenious Create Tools Menu Log in Menu Search
Spacer image
Spacer image
save to my links [ + ]read caption
Topic section: Selling
TOPIC SECTION:
Selling
The year 1829 saw the first use of a practicable steam locomotive when Rocket won the Rainhill Trials. Within five years loc
Image: Neilson Co drawing of export locomotive
Neilson & Co drawing of export locomotive
Credit: Science Museum/Science & Society Picture Library
omotives and rolling stock were being exported to many countries for use in industrial enterprises, particularly to Russia and North America. This speed of ‘technology transfer’ is really very impressive given the communications systems of the ti
This speed of ‘technology transfer’ is really very impressive
me. Because the technology was so new, an engineer often accompanied the first locomotive to its destination, ensuring that it was assembled and used correctly. Some engineers took their families with them and remained in these countries to help build the rest of the railway system. As a consequence, new production of locomotives, rolling stock and infrastructure began that competed directly with British companies - and often was more efficient. The Americans began building locomotives in the 1830s.

Bef
Image: Timothy Hackworth, English engineer and railway pioneer
Timothy Hackworth, English engineer and railway pioneer, c 1830.
Credit: Science Museum/Science & Society Picture Library
ore the invention of photography, drawings were the main advertising tool. These types of drawings were much more aesthetically pleasing than those created for production. They were often colour washed and shown in a very flattering light to appear more attractive and impressive. Iconic drawings of classic railway designs were also used on business cards, brochures and company literature.

By the 1850s the emerging markets of the British Empire provided ready-made demand for the products of the British railway industry. New opportunities were quickly exploited too in Japan and China. Private locomotive constructors in particular were very adept at spotting potential new markets and sending out marketing materials on a speculative basis. These usually included ‘technical’ drawings, ‘attractive’ drawings (soon replaced by photographs) and prose featuring the heritage of railways in Britain.

Since the Second World War there has been a decline in exports of railway locomotives and rolling stock by British firms to the rest of the world. Currently there is only one volume manufacturer and it is building vehicles designed abroad under licence for use on the UK domestic railways. Engineering drawings are no longer used to sell the locomotives; instead video, photographs and brochures are the norm.


 

 
 
Spacer image

Spacer image
Topic section: The production process
Spacer image
James Watt pioneered the use of drawn-to-scale engineering plans. The skills needed were adapted from the work of the rural blacksmith  > more

Spacer image
Spacer image
Engineering drawings have an aesthetic value and their beauty encourages appreciation beyond the engineers who understand them  > more
 
Click here to print this page in a printer friendly format  > Printer friendly version > Back to top
© NMSI. All rights reserved. | terms of use | sitemap | contact us | accessibility | privacy | who we are
Spacer image
Spacer image
Read More
Please click here to explore this topic further and to access our our stories featuring images from our collections and related materials ranging from Unusual takes, voices to biographies and more.
If your browser is not javascript enabled then click here to Read More. To learn how to javascript enable your browser click here.
  right arrow Voices - of people involved
  right arrow Unusual Takes - the unexpected angle


See caption
Click below to see images related to this section
Related to: