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Topic section: Images of ourselves
TOPIC SECTION:
Images of ourselves
Picture: 1983-5236_DHA7106s1embed.jpg
Twiggy arriving at a sculptor's studio, to be cast for a shop mannequin,1966.
Credit: NMPFT/Syndication International
Mainstream celebrity culture thrives on youthfulness, beauty, health, wealth and social connections. Celebrities tread a fine line between cont

Celebrities tread a fine line between controlling the exploitation of their image and being exploited by it

rolling the exploitation of their image and being exploited by it. Glamour photography, Hello and OK!-style magazines and the paparazzi offer varying ways of perceiving celebrity.

Hollywood stars flock to people like digital retoucher Pascal Dangin, who will ensure they look supremely beyond their best. But image manipulation is not just the lifeline of the famous-yet-wrinkled, it can also be useful for eclectic, tongue-in-cheek effects. Photo
Picture: 1983-5236_A05395s1embed.jpg
Sunray 'treatment', 1932.
Credit: NMPFT/Syndication International
grapher Martin Parr plays on the idea of controlling his self-portrait in Autoportrait. In this series, Parr documents his experience of local studio and street photographers and his appearance in photo-booths as he travels around the world. Autoportrait includes Parr in the mouth of a shark, in Victorian costume and as a digitally enhanced Mr Universe.

Clearly, manipulated portraits reveal our innermost desires – how we might want to appear, and how others would like to imagine us.
 
 
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Topic section: Images in advertising
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Advertisers often manipulate images to help sell their products by making reality look more desirable. They keep producing new, more seductive images to replace those that are past their ‘use-by’ date so as to lock us into a cycle of spending and consuming.  > more

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Topic section: Images as evidence
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The news constantly reminds us of the importance of the image in politics. Joseph Stalin and other dictators have often manipulated images. Illusionists and con-men have also realised that doctored images could be a powerful weapon in their armoury.  > more
 
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