sitemap | help
Click here to access to our stories featuring images from our collections and related materials ranging from Unusual takes, voices to biographies and more. Click here to find a feature debate and other debates related to some of our subjects and topics found with the READ section, please note, you need to be a registered user to participate in debates Click here to browse or search for images and related materials.  Alternatively use the advanced search for more detailed queries. Click here to create your own web galleries using our image collections or to personalise your experience within Ingenious.  Please note that you need to be a registered user to work with the CREATE tools.  Go to the 'Register' link to utilise Ingenious Create Tools Menu Log in Menu Search
Spacer image
Spacer image
save to my links [ + ]read caption
Topic section: ‘It’s news... but not as we know it’ – the future of news
TOPIC SECTION:
‘It’s news... but not as we know it’ – the future of news
Picture: 03A_1983-5236_114235.jpg
Journalists are storytellers who need an audience.
Credit: NMPFT/Syndication International

Today, we are living through a ‘news revolution’.  Communications technology has changed dramatically in recent years, and the speed of change will, if anything, accelerate in the future. The use of new media will completely transform the news industry. However, should technological change be viewed as a threat to ‘traditional’ news, or will it complement it, ultimately improving the quality and choice of news available to the consumer? The development of new ways of gathering and distributing news does not necessarily herald the disappearance of traditional forms of presenting it. The newspaper may have replaced the coffee house as a source of news, but this does not mean that the Internet will inevitably replace the newspaper. After all, the humble pencil has survived the invention of the ballpoint pen, the typewriter and the computer.

Picture: 03B_News24.jpg
Audiences are able to watch news 24 hours a day.
Credit: Copyright © BBC
Not so very long ago we could get the news from a limited number of newspapers and regular bulletins on three or four radio and television channels. Today, we can choose from dozens of TV channels (some offering nothing but news, 24 hours a day) or hundreds of thousands of

Journalists are storytellers who need an audience and so the future of news will be shaped more by journalists and consumers

 sites on the Internet. Little wonder then that the number of people watching TV news bulletins or reading a daily newspaper has gradually declined over the last few years. No longer dependent on the judgements of newspaper editors and television producers as to the content of our daily news, we can now create our own ‘personalised’ news based on our own preferences and interests and selected from many different sources. No more boring politics and world events, just local news and celebrity gossip. No more having to sit through an entire news programme just to find out the football results. We shall no longer have to wait for the news; in the future, the news will wait for us.
Picture: 01C_10300357.jpg
INTELSAT, the International Telecommunciation Satellite Organisation, is jointly owned by all its member nations and has established a worldwide system of satellites, which provide most of the world's international communications.
Credit: Science Museum/Science & Society Picture Library


It is clear that during a period of such dramatic change people and organisations involved in supplying the news constantly have to reconsider what they are doing and how they are doing it. There can be no doubt that we shall all get our news differently in the future but this does not necessarily mean that the news we get will be any different.

Regardless of the technology used to gather and distribute it, the essence of news remains the same. Journalists are storytellers who need an audience and so the future of news will be shaped more by journalists and consumers than by the changing technologies by which it is gathered and disseminated. The media reflect the social and political interests of their audiences. A range of factors – including economics and culture – influence the way that the media represent and define the times in which we live. It is society rather than science that dictates the nature of news. Ultimately, we get the news that we deserve.

 
 
Spacer image

Spacer image
Topic section: Bad news travels fast?
Spacer image
Thanks to modern technology, news now travels at the speed of light. A scoop is exclusive to one news provider for only a few seconds and deadlines become meaningless. Welcome to the world of breaking news!  > more

Spacer image
Topic section: News – does more mean better?
Spacer image
News now flows constantly from websites and 24-hour news channels. To meet this insatiable demand, stories are constantly recycled. With the emphasis on producing material rather than accuracy, mistakes are made, sometimes with serious consequences for the organisations involved.  > more
 
Click here to print this page in a printer friendly format  > Printer friendly version > Back to top
© NMSI. All rights reserved. | terms of use | sitemap | contact us | accessibility | privacy | who we are
Spacer image
Spacer image
Read More
Please click here to explore this topic further and to access our our stories featuring images from our collections and related materials ranging from Unusual takes, voices to biographies and more.
If your browser is not javascript enabled then click here to Read More. To learn how to javascript enable your browser click here.
  right arrow Voices - of people involved
  right arrow Unusual Takes - the unexpected angle


See caption
Click here to see images related to this section
Related to: