sitemap | help
Click here to access to our stories featuring images from our collections and related materials ranging from Unusual takes, voices to biographies and more. Click here to find a feature debate and other debates related to some of our subjects and topics found with the READ section, please note, you need to be a registered user to participate in debates Click here to browse or search for images and related materials.  Alternatively use the advanced search for more detailed queries. Click here to create your own web galleries using our image collections or to personalise your experience within Ingenious.  Please note that you need to be a registered user to work with the CREATE tools.  Go to the 'Register' link to utilise Ingenious Create Tools Menu Log in Menu Search
Spacer image
Spacer image
save to my links [ + ]read caption
Topic section: The route
TOPIC SECTION:
The route
The route of the Flying Scotsman comprises 390 miles (628 kilometres) of the East Coast Main Line, between London King’s Cross and Ed
Image: Poster of the east coast route 1900-1910
The Victorian railway companies issued this poster between 1900 and 1910 and graphically represents why the east coast route took its name. Credit: National Railway Museum/Science & Society Picture Library
inburgh Waverley stations. The East Coast Main Line is the second most important route on Britain’s rail network, and one of the most modern high-speed railways in Britain.
Despite electrification and High Speed Trains, today’s East Coast Main Line remains the legacy of three Victorian railway companies: the Great Northern, the North British and the North East
..making the route of the Flying Scotsman one of the most modern high-speed railways in Britain
ern. These three companies built the route of the Flying Scotsman to suit their needs, but it remains an open question if these needs hold good for the 21st century.

The section between London King’s Cross and Doncaster was built by the Great Northern Railway and opened in 1853. The North Eastern Railway built the section between Doncaster and Berwick, but the current route was not opened until 1876. The North British Railway built the line between Berwick and Edinburgh in 1846.

The original station at York was built as a terminus, inside the old city walls. Trains going north or south had to reverse into the station. This inconvenience was removed in 1877 when York’s new station opened.

Until 1906 Newcastle was also a terminus, with trains being forced to reverse into the city’s main station. However, a new bridge over the River Tyne solved this access problem.

The last realignment of the East Coast Main Line in the 20th century was in 1
Ralph Wedgwood locomotive damaged after an air raid on 29 April 1942
The East Coast Main Line was a prime target for the German Air Force during the 2nd World War. Here the locomotive Sir Ralph Wedgwood lies damaged, following an air raid on 29 April 1942 Credit: Science & Society Picture Library
983, when a 13-mile (21-kilometre) diversion was built around the Selby coalfield. The diversion was built to avoid any possibility of subsidence affecting the tracks running over what was then an active mining area.

British Rail completed the electrification of the East Coast Main Line in 1991, making the route of the Flying Scotsman one of the most modern high-speed railways in Britain. This proved to be British Rail’s swan song, as the railways were privatised in 1994.

The current holder of the operating franchise for the route of the Flying Scotsman is the Great North Eastern Railway (GNER). Network Rail is responsible for maintaining the track, signals and stations.

 
 
Spacer image

Spacer image
Topic section: The train
Spacer image
Beginning service in 1862, by the 1930’s the name Flying Scotsman was synonymous with luxury express travel. In the last fifty years an emphasis on reducing journey times has helped the train maintain its position as a premier service on the east coast route.  > more

Spacer image
Topic section: The engine
Spacer image
Why is the Flying Scotsman famous? Ever since being named after Flying Scotsman (the train), the engine has always been placed by its owners in the public eye.  > more
 
Click here to print this page in a printer friendly format  > Printer friendly version > Back to top
© NMSI. All rights reserved. | terms of use | sitemap | contact us | accessibility | privacy | who we are
Spacer image
Spacer image
Read More
Please click here to explore this topic further and to access our our stories featuring images from our collections and related materials ranging from Unusual takes, voices to biographies and more.
If your browser is not javascript enabled then click here to Read More. To learn how to javascript enable your browser click here.
  right arrow Voices - of people involved
  right arrow Unusual Takes - the unexpected angle


See caption
Click here to see images related to this section
Related to: