An interview with Secretary of State for International Development, Justine Greening

An interview with Secretary of State for International Development, Justine Greening

Gender equality, environmental sustainability and the power of youth: the International Development Secretary talks about her hopes for the Youth Summit and Global Goals. #YouthSummit. Our goals. Our voice. Our future. The sound of drums echoes around the halls of the Department of International Development on Whitehall. The air is buzzing with the energy of more than 250 youth volunteers. We are here to be part of the change, to tell International Development Secretary Justine Greening about the global issues we care about, and to share ideas about how to implement the Global Goals, or Sustainable Development Goals. All of us have volunteered as part of International Citizen Service; we have worked with young people across the world to fight global poverty and we have seen that there is more that unites us than divides us. At the start of the 2015 Youth Summit, Vix Anderton and Kwame Sekyere interviewed the International Development Secretary to hear her views on a range of issues and the importance of the summit. Her passion for her work at the Department for International Development, the importance of the Sustainable Development Goals and the power of engaging young people in the fight against global poverty was clear from the outset. You can watch the full interview or read the report below. With thanks to International Service ICS alumna Josh Ho for creating this film.  Secretary of State, do you believe that in order to receive aid, countries should show commitments to human rights? We place a huge priority on human rights and it’s a big part of our programming and how we deliver projects...
where are you in the line of inequality?

where are you in the line of inequality?

Jonathan Wing, 19, is from Coventry and volunteered with VSO ICS in Cebu City in the Phillipines. Jonathan attended a session hosted by World Vision and exploring issues of inequality. The session was led by Manthen Pravin, Emma Clarke, Tracy shields , Yasmin Edwards and Mally Askin. “The session started with us taking on the profiles of people to find out where they stand in terms of inequality. The facilitator would ask a question about our profile and we, such as whether you were accepted into the community, or is your home a violent free home. The questions were designed to show where the lines of inequality fall, with people physically stepping forward in response. There was great feedback from this session and many people thought that talking about inequality is one thing, but seeing the differences brought to life physically was really powerful. One participant said: “When you say it, it doesn’t look that bad, but as soon as you see the line and who’s further forward than others, then you realise just how bad the situation can be.”...
Youth Summit: how it all began

Youth Summit: how it all began

Aaron Toland, aged 22 from Belfast, volunteered with Progressio ICS in Honduras. Here, he captures the opening activity at the Youth Summit. The Secretary of State for International Development Justine Greening opened the Youth Summit reflecting on the success of the MDGs. Poverty has been halved, child mortality slashed, to name a few. Justine focused on the differences in the SDGs and the MDGs,  the focus of sustainability and universal application. She linked SDG 16:Peace and Justice to the refugee crisis in Syria and emphasised the need for a peaceful and just world, free from violence. Justine looked at the crowd and said that events like this are how change occurs, and that young people have two major roles to play in achieving these SDGs: *Be advocates of change* “Our voice and our opinions of what we want in our world.” *Be agents of change* “Get pulled of the audience and onto the stage, change things, be the change maker.” The crowd were greeted to a video message from Nobel Laureate Malala Yousofzai who started by apologising that she could not attend, but reassured those in attendance it was for a valid reason, for the education that she had fought hard for. The documentary “He Called Me Malala” showcasing Malala’s story is released across the UK on 6th November. Anti-FGM activist stepped up to a roaring crowd, thanked everyone for the invitation to the Youth Summit and praised the role young people have had to date. Fahma reflected upon the challenges of raising issues as a young person, ranging from having over 75 people protesting at her college over an anti-FGM event that was planned,...