Daily vlog from the Global Goals summit

Daily vlog from the Global Goals summit

This week, world leaders converge on the United Nations in New York to set new Global Goals to end poverty and climate change for good. But what’s it like to be at the heart of this historic moment? Ronagh Craddock, 25, from Newcastle, and Arifa Nasim, 18, from London are the first official UK youth delegates at the United Nations General Assembly, making sure the voices of young people are heard. You can follow their updates in vlogs uploaded here on The Youth Summit website. Day 3: History is made – and young people were there Day 2: The Youth Blast – a space for young people to engage with the UN Day 1: ‘It’s only right that we [young people] are a leading part of the process’ You can also follow their updates on Twitter: @arifa_aleem & @ronaghcraddock And on Snapchat: ronagh.craddock &...

Infographic: #youthsummit highlights

Last week’s ‪#‎YouthSummit‬ saw young people speak up on the global issues they care about ahead of the landmark United Nations summit on the Global Goals to end poverty. Take a look at this infographic for a snapshot of the #youthsummit and conversations that happened on the day. Click on infographic to share it on Facebook.    ...
An interview with Secretary of State for International Development, Justine Greening

An interview with Secretary of State for International Development, Justine Greening

Gender equality, environmental sustainability and the power of youth: the International Development Secretary talks about her hopes for the Youth Summit and Global Goals. #YouthSummit. Our goals. Our voice. Our future. The sound of drums echoes around the halls of the Department of International Development on Whitehall. The air is buzzing with the energy of more than 250 youth volunteers. We are here to be part of the change, to tell International Development Secretary Justine Greening about the global issues we care about, and to share ideas about how to implement the Global Goals, or Sustainable Development Goals. All of us have volunteered as part of International Citizen Service; we have worked with young people across the world to fight global poverty and we have seen that there is more that unites us than divides us. At the start of the 2015 Youth Summit, Vix Anderton and Kwame Sekyere interviewed the International Development Secretary to hear her views on a range of issues and the importance of the summit. Her passion for her work at the Department for International Development, the importance of the Sustainable Development Goals and the power of engaging young people in the fight against global poverty was clear from the outset. You can watch the full interview or read the report below. With thanks to International Service ICS alumna Josh Ho for creating this film.  Secretary of State, do you believe that in order to receive aid, countries should show commitments to human rights? We place a huge priority on human rights and it’s a big part of our programming and how we deliver projects...

An interview with Permanent Secretary Mark Lowcock

ICS volunteers Jonny Fowle and Kwame Seykere interviewed Department for International Development Permanent Secretary Mark Lowcock. Here the Permanent Secretary shares his insights from a 30 year career in international development, and explains why he is passionate about what the next generation can achieve. With thanks to International Service alumna Josh Ho for creating this...
where are you in the line of inequality?

where are you in the line of inequality?

Jonathan Wing, 19, is from Coventry and volunteered with VSO ICS in Cebu City in the Phillipines. Jonathan attended a session hosted by World Vision and exploring issues of inequality. The session was led by Manthen Pravin, Emma Clarke, Tracy shields , Yasmin Edwards and Mally Askin. “The session started with us taking on the profiles of people to find out where they stand in terms of inequality. The facilitator would ask a question about our profile and we, such as whether you were accepted into the community, or is your home a violent free home. The questions were designed to show where the lines of inequality fall, with people physically stepping forward in response. There was great feedback from this session and many people thought that talking about inequality is one thing, but seeing the differences brought to life physically was really powerful. One participant said: “When you say it, it doesn’t look that bad, but as soon as you see the line and who’s further forward than others, then you realise just how bad the situation can be.”...