Meet Harry Phinda, YouthForChange

Meet Harry Phinda, YouthForChange

Huma Javed is 25 and from Bradford. She volunteered with Lattitude ICS in Malawi in 2013. Huma spoke to Harry Phinda at the Youth Summit and shares her interview here: Who, what, where? Harry is a co-founder of YouthForChange, a charitable organisation based in London and working in partnership with DFID. Biggest challenge? Globally, young people account for half of the world’s population but don’t always have the ability to actually make a change. Biggest achievement? YouthForChange has established four different youth panels around the world, in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Tanzania and the UK. Current focus? Currently focused on development goal 5 – gender equality. The #ICommit campaign we are running is tackling female genital mutilation and early forced marriage in developing...
The Gender Goal and You!

The Gender Goal and You!

Fletch Williams reports on a workshop led by VSO and Progressio, exploring how the global goal addressing gender equality can become a reality. Fletch is 26 and from Cambridge, and volunteered in Lesotho with Skillshare International ICS. “Being a woman shouldn’t hold you back” “What inspires me is the motivation women have to better themselves” Gender and injustice are key barriers to development Characteristics should associated with individuals, not genders. In a gender equal world we are not shoved into boxes. You do not need to be in a developing country to experience gender inequality – and this helps us feel empathy, which drives development causes. Stereotypes impair development and limit how people can contribute to their communities. We need to think about who controls the money, where caring responsibilities lie, and who makes decisions. Only 13 of 193 heads of government are women – how can we guarantee that women will be considered equally if they are not equally represented? These issues are all interlinked and impact gender equality – you can’t change one without changing them all! We should be proud of the gender goal (Goal 5) – it looks at tackling the route causes of gender inequality. Local people need to be able to tell global decision makers what gender equality means to them. In every country, in every community, we need to build capacity and expertise and enable those with passion to challenge unfair power relations and create change. ICS Volunteers have powerful stories about why gender equality matters. What was clear from the stories ICS volunteers shared was that by empowering local communities you can...
5 things you may not have known about FGM and CEFM and how you can help

5 things you may not have known about FGM and CEFM and how you can help

Holly Campbell, 20, volunteered with Raleigh ICS in India in 2013. Here she shares her report from a workshop exploring a Year of Girls’ Rights, led by YouthForChange. Last year the UK hosted the first Girl Summit, aimed at mobilising domestic and international efforts to end female genital mutilation (FGM) and child, early and forced marriage (CEFM) within a generation. How will the Global Goals help maintain that momentum? 1.These are Human rights breaches Child, early and forced marriage (CEFM) and Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) are both issues that, despite what others may argue, are a breach of human rights. Despite there being four types of FGM there are no health benefits from the practice. It results not only in physical pain and problems such as UTIs, cysts and fertility issues but also leaves huge psychological damage. Similarly, CEFM causes a plethora of issues such as women dropping out of school, lack of freedom, prevention of economic opportunity and both psychological and physical damage. Around 700,000 young girls die each year from CEFM induced child birth. 2.This is happening on our doorstep Although many may think these issues are taking place in areas far away from home, it is a shock to hear that many of these issues are taking place in the UK. Over 137,000 women in the UK have been affected by FGM. Making up a substantial proportion of the 125 million to be affected worldwide. It’s not just about girls Although the workshop was based on gender equality and in particular girls’ rights, this does not mean that men were excluded. We were all surprised to...
Jemma Reid: why I am passionate about Goal 15

Jemma Reid: why I am passionate about Goal 15

Youth Reporter Rose Ziaei (left) speaks to Youth Summit delegate Jemma Reid (right), who volunteered with Progressio ICS in Nicaragua last year. Jemma is at the summit to speak to Progressio alumni about future opportunities and the Global Goals. What are you looking forward to the most today? Engaging with young-minded people who are ambitious and enthusiastic. What do you think is the most important Sustainable Development Goal and why? Goal 15 – sustainable land use and halting bio diversity loss. I am currently studying International Relations but the reason why I’m interested in Goal 15 is because of my volunteering experience. I volunteered in Tanzania on a conservation programme for biodiversity loss and my Progressio ICS placement in Nicaragua included a lot of work around sustaining land. We’re a growing population and it’s incredibly important to raise awareness about these issues because what we do is impacting small indigenous communities that we don’t normally think about in everyday life. What advice would you give to young people wanting to pursue a career in international development? I would suggest practical experience whether it is paid or volunteering or an internship. Enthusiasm is key. And making sure that you’re pursuing something that you are truly passionate about. You have to be proactive. Do not underestimate the skills you gained from ICS, even if it is something as small as interviewing someone from the community. To find out more about ICS, visit...