Challenging the development narrative

Challenging the development narrative

Joanna Callender, 25, went with Tearfund ICS to Rwanda. She’s from Belfast but lives in England. She joined BOND for a workshop exploring how we can challenge the development narrative. All of us will have been confronted with negative images and stories of development upon returning from our placements. But in these cases what do you say back? How do we challenge the general narrative on development? Joanna shares her new insights here: 1. It turns out that not everyone understands the benefits of international development Concern for global poverty has HALVED in recent years, and after overseas trips, it turns out that some people ask some really obscure questions, such as….. “Did the people you were helping have pets?” Not really the response anyone is looking for after their incredible ICS experience. 2. There are THREE big barriers to public support in development CYNICISM – That there’s been no progress in making the world fairer DISTANCE – That poverty is just too far away to understand. FUTILITY – It’s not worth even trying to make a difference. 3. The Narrative project tries to re-frame development as a good thing. Check out the ‘Independence, partnership, progress and shared values’ graphic. 4. We should use POSITIVE language when talking about development issues Words like…. OPPORTUNITY DIGNITY SHARING CO-OPERATION Words and stories that will make people see the positive things we can do to make a difference to the lives of others. Your positive words CAN make a difference. 5. We are fighting against the tide Only 32% of people in the UK are engaged in global issues. It is up to...
Making Influential Waves

Making Influential Waves

Charlotte Bennett, 24, volunteered with Skillshare International in South Africa. Here she shares her report on Workshop 2: Influencing the influential in the fight to end poverty , hosted by RESULTS UK.  Have you ever wanted to have your say but lack the confidence to speak up? It can be nerve-wracking speaking to the people who make the decisions, especially if you know they have a different opinion from you. Whilst you may fear how you look or how you sound, remember you have a message, a purpose and can get Results! So here are a few top tips from Team Results UK Be Prepared Be Enthusiastic Be real Stand up, speak out, share your message and make results. Here is Kadir and Mark Role Playing The perfect way to influence the influential.                         To close Tom Maguire kindly shared some advice on how to be that influential power: Research your topic area Prepare an agenda in advance – know your aim. Win their hearts and their heads – provide personal stories to bring things to life. Practice Speaking – whether that is to friends and family or your own in the mirror. Smile – Share a story make it personal, make a connection. Creating long term relationships. Have an ask – ask them to do something. Thank them for their time. Be persistent and follow up. Are you an active global citizen ready to make those waves to Stand up, be heard and get results? We hope this article will help you on your way to making...
Trying to change the world – one tweet at a time

Trying to change the world – one tweet at a time

Lucy Giuliano, aged 25 from Derby, volunteered for International Service in Burkina Faso. She attended a workshop exploring social media storytelling – an insight into vlogging and social media as communication tools. Here she shares her highlights and tips from the session. ‘Be compelling, captivating and passionate’ Digital communications are increasingly regarded as the future of engaging with your audience. Whether it be promoting a product via a YouTube advert or tweeting an online petition, vlogging and social media are considered as a platform to reach a large audience in a simple way, particularly in the charity sector. Offering a personal experience, this method of storytelling gets a message across easily and can be effectively used in raising awareness of campaigns, events and organisations. In this workshop Save the Children’s resident vlogger explained how to best use this platform in the quest to “make your voice heard above all the noise, including the cinnamon challenges”. There was an emphasis on being specific. Storytelling differs to reporting as you need to immediately grab your viewer’s attention before they go and watch a goat video instead. Focus on one issue, speak with authority and assume your audience has no prior knowledge of it. Not only that but be passionate and genuine to create a connection, compel and captivate your viewer. Sounds tricky? Don’t worry, you can re-shoot, edit and condense until you only have the highlights, the so called “best version of you”. It’s no myth that a lot of what you see on the internet is scripted and painstakingly edited before it makes it to YouTube, even those cat videos. So now...
Fahma Mohamed talks anti-FGM activism and youth campaigning

Fahma Mohamed talks anti-FGM activism and youth campaigning

Raleigh ICS volunteer Holly Campbell interviews Youth Summit special guest speaker Fahma Mohamed on girls’ rights, campaigning, and overcoming shyness. Fahma is pictured with her sister, Hamda, and Justine Greening. How did you first become involved in campaigning against FGM? Despite living in a community where it is practiced, I was very unaware of FGM or what it stood for as a child. It wasn’t until year 7 that I asked my mother, who explained it to me and how it was practiced in the UK. At first I didn’t believe her. How could this be happening at all, let alone in the UK? And why isn’t anyone doing anything about it? It was from this point that I gradually became more involved in campaigning, starting in the background before coming more confident and passionate. What would your advice be to young people who would also like to campaign against the issue but maybe are too shy or don’t know where to start? At first I too was very shy! My best advice is to take baby steps – no one expects you to jump in straight away and do speeches. For me, it took many years. You don’t need to be behind cameras to influence change, as long as you are helping in some way you are doing great. Do what you feel comfortable with. What do you feel is the key way to help stop the issue of FGM? Of course there are many complex ways to address the issue, but in the end it all ties down to education. In particular, FGM and girls’ rights needs...