Daily vlog from the Global Goals summit

Daily vlog from the Global Goals summit

This week, world leaders converge on the United Nations in New York to set new Global Goals to end poverty and climate change for good. But what’s it like to be at the heart of this historic moment? Ronagh Craddock, 25, from Newcastle, and Arifa Nasim, 18, from London are the first official UK youth delegates at the United Nations General Assembly, making sure the voices of young people are heard. You can follow their updates in vlogs uploaded here on The Youth Summit website. Day 3: History is made – and young people were there Day 2: The Youth Blast – a space for young people to engage with the UN Day 1: ‘It’s only right that we [young people] are a leading part of the process’ You can also follow their updates on Twitter: @arifa_aleem & @ronaghcraddock And on Snapchat: ronagh.craddock &...

Infographic: #youthsummit highlights

Last week’s ‪#‎YouthSummit‬ saw young people speak up on the global issues they care about ahead of the landmark United Nations summit on the Global Goals to end poverty. Take a look at this infographic for a snapshot of the #youthsummit and conversations that happened on the day. Click on infographic to share it on Facebook.    ...
Meet Mundiah Aftab

Meet Mundiah Aftab

Elizabeth Bevon, 23, is a Raleigh ICS Nicaragua alumnus from Manchester. She Interviewed Mundiah Aftab, 17, who is a volunteer with Islamic Relief. 1. How can we make the Global Goals for Sustainable Development “famous”? Create a buzz. Young people today are the leaders of tomorrow. We need to instil passion now by creating a hype, by reiterating that there is a problem and it will affect us. We must nuture our future leaders and ensure the ideas are passed on, otherwise development will just be stagnant. 2. What made you sign up to take part in the Youth Summit? As a young person, I am passionate about grasping every opportunity to give input to change. We have only a short time and as individuals it may seem that we can’t do much, but we can be a piece of the puzzle. Working together we can achieve so much more and I want to share my passion with other young people. 3. If we do just one thing to work to meet the Global Goals, it would be…? Be an advocate. Be aware. And most importantly, make others...
A green future for all

A green future for all

Elizabeth Bevon, 23, is a Raleigh ICS Nicaragua alumnus from Manchester. Lizzy attended a workshop called “A green future for all”, hosted by the UK Youth Climate Coalition, including UKYCC. The session aimed to bring together international development, the UN, climate change and young people. It covered the importance of fighting climate change within international development and the action young people can take to support a sustainable global future. The session also featured information on how to influence the UN climate talks. Five take-aways from the session: 1. Social media and technology have become incredibly important to hold politicians, decision makers and big business to account over their actions on climate change. For example, UKYCC embarrassed Ed Davey, the ‘Missing Ministerial’ at the climate conferences in Bonn 2014, and the current #LazyLeader campaign. (http://ukycc.org/the-missing-minister-in-ministerial-ed-davey-why-arent-you-coming-to-bonn/ & http://ukycc.org/cameron-dont-be-a-lazyleader/) 2. There have been huge leaps and bounds in including young people in the discussion on climate change. 1999 was the first time a young person was allowed to speak at a UN conference; at the COP 21 in Paris this year, there will be 20,000 young people getting involved. You can make your voice heard by sending a ‘Postcard to Paris’ as part of the campaign being run by UKYCC. 3. We need to push for action. In 1997 the Kyoto Protocol agreed that they would have legal outcomes by 2015! That’s 18 years of politicians and decision makers dragging their feet while the situation on climate change deteriorated. Not only that, but it seems that countries will only agree to the bare minimum on climate targets. This is simply not good enough....
Meet Harry Phinda, YouthForChange

Meet Harry Phinda, YouthForChange

Huma Javed is 25 and from Bradford. She volunteered with Lattitude ICS in Malawi in 2013. Huma spoke to Harry Phinda at the Youth Summit and shares her interview here: Who, what, where? Harry is a co-founder of YouthForChange, a charitable organisation based in London and working in partnership with DFID. Biggest challenge? Globally, young people account for half of the world’s population but don’t always have the ability to actually make a change. Biggest achievement? YouthForChange has established four different youth panels around the world, in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Tanzania and the UK. Current focus? Currently focused on development goal 5 – gender equality. The #ICommit campaign we are running is tackling female genital mutilation and early forced marriage in developing...
The Gender Goal and You!

The Gender Goal and You!

Fletch Williams reports on a workshop led by VSO and Progressio, exploring how the global goal addressing gender equality can become a reality. Fletch is 26 and from Cambridge, and volunteered in Lesotho with Skillshare International ICS. “Being a woman shouldn’t hold you back” “What inspires me is the motivation women have to better themselves” Gender and injustice are key barriers to development Characteristics should associated with individuals, not genders. In a gender equal world we are not shoved into boxes. You do not need to be in a developing country to experience gender inequality – and this helps us feel empathy, which drives development causes. Stereotypes impair development and limit how people can contribute to their communities. We need to think about who controls the money, where caring responsibilities lie, and who makes decisions. Only 13 of 193 heads of government are women – how can we guarantee that women will be considered equally if they are not equally represented? These issues are all interlinked and impact gender equality – you can’t change one without changing them all! We should be proud of the gender goal (Goal 5) – it looks at tackling the route causes of gender inequality. Local people need to be able to tell global decision makers what gender equality means to them. In every country, in every community, we need to build capacity and expertise and enable those with passion to challenge unfair power relations and create change. ICS Volunteers have powerful stories about why gender equality matters. What was clear from the stories ICS volunteers shared was that by empowering local communities you can...