Skip to content

Personal Well-being Three Year Dataset Maps (Interactive and Static) This product is designated as National Statistics

Introduction

In October 2014 we released the first ever combined 3 year Personal Well-being Annual Population Dataset. The enhanced sample size of the 3 year dataset compared with the annual has allowed for more detailed analysis at lower levels of geography. For the first time, we have released maps with Personal Well-being data at local authority district level.

This release displays the estimates from this dataset in both interactive and static maps.

Interactive maps

To explore the data and find out what personal well-being is like in your area please see our interactive maps.

Life satisfaction (Static)

Overall, people in the UK said that their average life satisfaction was 7.5 out of 10. Looking at responses across local authorities in the UK, these estimates ranged from 6.9 to 8.2 out of 10. When looking at the percentage of people responding along the 0 to 10 scale, more people answered on the positive end of the scale (7 to 10) than the negative (0 to 6), at 77.1% and 22.9% respectively.

Life Satisfaction

United Kingdom

Overall, people in the UK said that their average life satisfaction was 7.5 out of 10
Source: Annual Population Survey (APS) - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Adults aged 16 and over were asked 'Overall, how satisfied are you with your life nowadays?' where 0 is 'not at all satisfied' and 10 is 'completely satisfied'.
  2. All data are weighted.
  3. Thresholds have been combined to provide more robust estimates.
  4. Any sample size less than 50 has been suppressed for quality reasons.

Download map

  • PNG
    (516.6 Kb)

Worthwhile (Static)

When looking at all questions, more people answered at the positive end of the scale (7 to 10) for worthwhile than for any other question, at 80.8%. Worthwhile also generated the highest average of all the 4 questions, at 7.7 out of 10.

Worthwhile

United Kingdom

Worthwhile generated the highest average of all the 4 questions, at 7.7 out of 10
Source: Annual Population Survey (APS) - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Adults aged 16 and over were asked 'Overall, to what extent do you feel the things you do in your life are worthwhile?' where 0 is 'not at all worthwhile' and 10 is 'completely worthwhile'.
  2. All data are weighted.
  3. Thresholds have been combined to provide more robust estimates.
  4. Any sample size less than 50 has been suppressed for quality reasons.

Download map

  • PNG
    (521.5 Kb)

Happiness (Static)

Happiness had the lowest average of the questions, at 7.3 out of 10. Happiness also had the highest percentage of people answering on the lower end of the scale (0 to 7), at 27.9%

Happiness

United Kingdom

Happiness had the lowest average of the questions, at 7.3 out of 10
Source: Annual Population Survey (APS) - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Adults aged 16 and over were asked 'Overall, how happy did you feel yesterday?' where 0 is 'not at all happy' and 10 is 'completely happy'.
  2. All data are weighted.
  3. Thresholds have been combined to provide more robust estimates.
  4. Any sample size less than 50 has been suppressed for quality reasons.

Download map

  • PNG
    (516.1 Kb)

Anxiety (Static)

For anxiety, the results on the lower end of the scale (0 to 6) represent lower anxiety and the results at the higher end of the scale (7 to 10) represent higher anxiety. Out of 10, on average people in the UK rated their level of anxiety yesterday as 3.0. More people answered on the lower end of the scale (0 to 6, representing high well-being), than the higher end of the scale (representing lower well-being) at 61.8% and 38.3% respectively.

Anxiety

United Kingdom

Out of 10, on average people in the UK rated their level of anxiety yesterday as 3.0
Source: Annual Population Survey (APS) - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Adults aged 16 and over were asked 'Overall, how anxious did you feel yesterday?' where 0 is 'not at all anxious' and 10 is 'completely anxious'.
  2. All data are weighted.
  3. Thresholds have been combined to provide more robust estimates.
  4. Any sample size less than 50 has been suppressed for quality reasons.

Download map

  • PNG
    (506.9 Kb)

Background notes

  1. Approved researchers can access the datasets at the UK Data Archive.

  2. If you have comments on the ONS approach to measuring personal well-being and/ or the presentation of the personal well-being data, please email us at personal.wellbeing@ons.gsi.gov.uk.

  3. The data analysed in this report was collected from the Annual Population Survey (APS) which is the largest constituent survey of the Integrated Household Survey. The sample size of the 3 year APS dataset is approximately 305,000 adults aged 16 and over and living in residential accommodation in the UK (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland). Data used are weighted to be representative of the population and to take account of the fact that responses made on behalf of other household members are not accepted.

  4. The UK Statistics Authority has designated these statistics as National Statistics, in accordance with the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007 and signifying compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

    Designation can be broadly interpreted to mean that the statistics:

    • meet identified user needs;

    • are well explained and readily accessible;

    • are produced according to sound methods; and

    • are managed impartially and objectively in the public interest.

    Once statistics have been designated as National Statistics it is a statutory requirement that the Code of Practice shall continue to be observed.

  5. Details of the policy governing the release of new data are available by visiting www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/assessment/code-of-practice/index.html or from the Media Relations Office email: media.relations@ons.gsi.gov.uk

    These National Statistics are produced to high professional standards and released according to the arrangements approved by the UK Statistics Authority.

Get all the tables for this publication in the data section of this publication .
Content from the Office for National Statistics.
© Crown Copyright applies unless otherwise stated.