You are here:

Health watchdogs and authorities

Care Quality Commission (CQC)

CQC logo

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) regulates all health and adult social care services in England, including those provided by the NHS, local authorities, private companies or voluntary organisation. It also protects the interests of people detained under the Mental Health Act. 

The CQC makes sure that essential standards of quality and safety are being met where care is provided, from hospitals to private care homes. It has a wide range of enforcement powers to take action on behalf of people who use services if services are unacceptably poor.

The CQC’s aim is to make sure better care is provided for everyone, whether that’s in hospital, in care homes, in people’s own homes or elsewhere. Read more about CQCs vision and values 

Involving people

The CQC makes sure that the voices of people who use health and adult social care services are heard by asking people to share their experiences of care services. It makes sure that users' views are at the heart of its reports and reviews. In some cases patients and their carers work alongside inspectors to provide a user's view of services. 

Registration

By law all NHS providers (such as hospitals and ambulance services) must register with the CQC to show they are protecting people from the risk of infection. The registration system applies to NHS provider trusts (acute, ambulance, mental health and primary care) and the NHS Blood and Transplant Authority.

From October l 2010 all health and adult social care providers must be registered and licensed with the CQC to show they are meeting essential standards of quality and safety. Without registration, providers will not be allowed to operate. 

Enforcement

The CQC has been given a range of legal powers and duties. It will take action if providers don’t meet essential standards of quality and safety, or if there is reason to think that people’s basic rights or safety are at risk.

The CQC can be flexible about how and when to use its enforcement powers, such as fines and public warnings. It can apply specific conditions in response to serious risks. For example, it can demand that a hospital ward or service is closed until the provider meets safety requirements or is suspended. It can take a service off the register if absolutely necessary. 

Improvement

The CQC also carries out periodic and special reviews in order to improve health and social care in the UK.

The CQC’s priority is to improve the public’s experience of health and social care.

Comments are personal views. Any information they give has not been checked and may not be accurate.

Tagsy said on 04 October 2012

Very sadly, yesterday a 90 year old male was sent to Aand E at RLUBH Liverpool by his GP for investigation. His mobility is poor and so he uses a wheelchair altgough he can mobilise for short distance. He is a friend and respected member of his local and church community. He arrived at 11 a.m. and was still waiting 11 hours later for a bed in the MAU. When his daughter enquired, she is an ex health service employee, awarded an OBE in this years honours list, she was told that 'the board' showed he had only arrived at 8 p.m.!!! A mistake or a deliberate error to show targets were being met we don't know - this does sound excessive. He was eventually admitted to a ward.
Perhaps the Commissioner would like to commission an investigation into waiting times at RLBUH and see if figures are being correctly recorded and how often this happens tp older people. Millions of pounds spen on IT systems and we can't even get a white board to work correctly! Perhaps thgis should be looked into before it gets to the press.

Report this content as offensive or unsuitable

gilesa said on 01 November 2011

this man should have been referred to the local office of the HPA
http://www.hpa.org.uk/AboutTheHPA/ContactUs/HealthProtectionAgencyOffices/LocalHealthProtectionUnits

the correct health professional is the one to talk to"!
giles

Report this content as offensive or unsuitable

loveshelpingpeople said on 18 June 2011

Hi Bill,
I have found this info that you might like to read on suitablitity for vaccination (http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/bcg/pages/faqs.aspx)

Why do we no longer vaccinate teenagers with BCG at school? How can I get my child vaccinated?
TB is a difficult disease to catch because it requires prolonged exposure to an infected person. For example, you are very unlikely to catch it by sitting or standing next to someone who is infected. Also, rates of TB in the indigenous population have fallen to very low levels over the past 15 years.

The BCG vaccination programme was changed to reflect this, following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation. The BCG vaccine is now only given to people in at-risk groups (see Who should have it).

If your child does not come into one of the higher-risk groups, the current advice is not to give them the BCG vaccination. There are private clinics that parents can approach for a BCG vaccination, but the NHS does not keep a list of these clinics.

Also, check out this address for information on "who should have it"
http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/BCG/Pages/When-it-is-needed.aspx

You don't say where you live but if you google
private bcg vaccination
it brings up a list of private practice that you might find useful.
Hope this helps,
Catherine

Report this content as offensive or unsuitable

loveshelpingpeople said on 18 June 2011

Hi Bill,
I have found this reference to who should you might be having trouble getting the info you need on the NHS web site

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/BCG/Pages/FAQs.aspx

which states:

Why do we no longer vaccinate teenagers with BCG at school? How can I get my child vaccinated?
TB is a difficult disease to catch because it requires prolonged exposure to an infected person. For example, you are very unlikely to catch it by sitting or standing next to someone who is infected. Also, rates of TB in the indigenous population have fallen to very low levels over the past 15 years.

The BCG vaccination programme was changed to reflect this, following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation. The BCG vaccine is now only given to people in at-risk groups (see Who should have it).

(Please check out this address which tells you who should be vaccintated)

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/BCG/Pages/When-it-is-needed.aspx

If your child does not come into one of the higher-risk groups, the current advice is not to give them the BCG vaccination. There are private clinics that parents can approach for a BCG vaccination, but the NHS does not keep a list of these clinics.

You don't say what area you are in but I have found one reference for you on the Internet for a private GP practice in Chelmsford that offer this service. Here is the http address.

http://www.privategpservices.co.uk/Services/vaccination/BCG/BCGVacc.html

Their tel no. is 01245 234134

Hope this helps,
Catherine

Report this content as offensive or unsuitable

william robert wright said on 03 June 2011

I normally regard the NHS as a great organisation. However, my latest experience has been disappointing. I recently phoned NHS Direct on behalf of my son and his wife. They recently had to have their seven month old twins vaccinated against tuberculosis, I believe it is called a BCG jab. They were told by NHS professionals that they also had to get their three year old daughter vaccinated with the BCG jab but she did not qualify to have it carried out on the NHS. Subsequently, I phoned NHS Direct for advice as to where we could pay privately for our granddaughter to have the vaccination. This led me to spend at least two hours phoning about twelve different numbers, all passed to me by different NHS personnel. Furthermore, I went on to the NHS ombudsman website that was also recommended to me but it turned out to be a law firm involved with litigation. I also tried phoning them but was spoken to by a solicitor who was unable to help. Having been told that our granddaughter should have the jab but not one being able to tell us where to get it has caused the family a great amount of worry. You are our last hope, so if our granddaughter does not qualify to have the vaccination on the NHS, please tell us where we can get it done privately.

Rergards

Bill

Report this content as offensive or unsuitable

Last reviewed: 13/07/2011

Next review due: 13/07/2013

Power of Attorney

Settle your future care and affairs by making a Power of Attorney to outline wishes if you become unable to make decisions.

Quality Accounts

All health service providers have to submit a report about the quality of their services. Read about Quality Accounts, including how and when to submit them.

NHS complaints

If you're not happy with the care you've received, you have the right to complain. Learn how

The NHS Constitution

Read about the NHS Constitution, which sets out rights and pledges for patients and the public.

Share your story

If you've experienced NHS health care recently, tell your story using the Patient Opinion service