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Report of the The Bloody Sunday Inquiry
- Volume VII - Chapter 122



The bodies of Michael McDaid, John Young and William Nash

Chapter 122: The bodies of Michael McDaid, John Young and William Nash

Contents

Paragraph

Collection of the bodies from the rubble barricade: the evidence of military
witnesses 122.1

Lieutenant N 122.1

Sergeant O 122.9

Corporal P 122.13

Private Q 122.15

Lance Corporal V, Private R, Private S and Private T 122.16

Private U 122.17

Private 006 122.21

Private 013 122.24

Private 017 122.26

Private 019 122.29

Captain 021 122.31

Captain 028 122.35

Private 112 122.40

Lance Bombardier 118 122.42

Corporal 162 122.45

Major Loden 122.47

Lieutenant Colonel Wilford 122.50

Private INQ 768 122.52

Private INQ 1579 122.53

Private INQ 1918 122.55

Collection of the bodies from the rubble barricade: the evidence of civilian
witnesses 122.57

Deirdre Barr 122.57

John (Christopher) Barrett 122.59

Marie Bradley 122.62

William Bridge 122.65

Kathleen Marie Doherty 122.67

Letty Donnelly 122.69

Albert Faulkner 122.72

Bernard Feeney 122.75

Ann Gallagher 122.79

Annie Gallagher and Elizabeth Fleming 122.82

Eileen Gallagher 122.86

Margo Harkin 122.88

Patricia Harkin 122.90

Sheila Harrigan 122.93

Monica Hegarty 122.96

Frank Lawton 122.99

Dolores MacFarland 122.106

William McDonagh 122.109

George McGinley 122.112

Kevin McGonagle 122.114

Nola McSwine 122.118

Olive Mottram 122.122

Alexander Nash 122.125

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital:
the evidence of priests 122.129

Fr John Irwin 122.129

Fr Vincent Anthony Mulvey 122.138

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital:
the evidence of Order of Malta Ambulance Corps witnesses 122.142

Leo Day 122.142

Alice Long 122.144

Bernard Feeney 122.159

Alice Long’s account of the firing of a rifle into the vehicle containing the
bodies: medical and scientific evidence 122.166

Dr John Lloyd 122.166

Dr Richard Shepherd and Mr Kevin O’Callaghan 122.168

Conclusions 122.169

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital:
the evidence of other civilian witnesses 122.170

Letty Donnelly 122.170

Ann Gallagher 122.173

Eileen Gallagher 122.176

Willie Healey 122.179

Frank Lawton 122.181

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital: the evidence of police officers 122.185

Constable A Brown 122.185

Sergeant S Penney 122.187

Constable Robert S Simpson 122.190

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital: the evidence of military witnesses 122.193

Lieutenant N 122.193

Sergeant O 122.199

Private Q 122.200

Private U 122.202

Private 006 122.203

Private 013 122.205

Captain 028 122.207

Warrant Officer Class II Lewis 122.209

Major Loden 122.212

Private 221’s examination of the bodies 122.213

Lieutenant N 122.213

Private 221 122.214

Movement of the bodies to Altnagelvin Hospital and their handling at the hospital: the evidence of military witnesses 122.217

Lieutenant N 122.217

Sergeant O 122.220

Corporal P 122.223

Private Q 122.226

Private U 122.227

Private 006 122.228

Private 013 122.229

Private 017 122.231

Private 112 122.233

Corporal 162 122.235

Private 221 122.236

Major Loden 122.238

Private INQ 768 122.239

Private INQ 1918 122.242

Handling of the bodies at Altnagelvin Hospital: the evidence of other witnesses 122.244

Fr John Irwin 122.244

Dr Thomas McCabe 122.248

Dr Ian Gordon 122.254

Detective Constable Colin Ferguson 122.256

Constable Hugh McCormac 122.258

Ivan Cooper 122.262

John Hume 122.271

George Downey 122.275

John Kelly 122.277

William McDermott 122.279

Consideration of the foregoing evidence 122.282

The collection of the bodies 122.282

The attempts to see and tend to the bodies 122.294

The movement of the bodies to Altnagelvin Hospital and their

handling there 122.301

Collection of the bodies from the rubble barricade: the evidence of military witnesses

Lieutenant N

122.1 In his second Royal Military Police (RMP) statement,1 Lieutenant N recorded that at about 1640 hours he was in command of an Armoured Personnel Carrier (APC) in Rossville Street. According to this statement he was instructed by Major Loden to investigate a body reported to be lying at the rubble barricade. He drove through the barricade in his APC with five members of Mortar Platoon. He caused the vehicle to be stopped and reversed towards the bodies of three young men lying huddled together on the south side of the barricade. Lieutenant N disembarked and looked at the bodies. They gave no signs of life. There was a man nearby, aged about 60 years, who mumbled about his shoulder being hurt . Lieutenant N directed this man to a first aid man for help. Lieutenant N supervised the loading by his men of the three bodies into his vehicle and then caused the vehicle to return to the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats.

1 B384-B385

122.2 According to Lieutenant N’s fourth RMP statement,1 Major Loden had instructed him to recover any bodies that were still at the barricade. Lieutenant N could not remember when this order was given. Lieutenant N stated that he briefly examined the older man who complained of a shoulder injury, but found no external sign of injury. The three bodies at the barricade were heaped one upon the other in an unnatural position . Each was lifted into the vehicle by three or four soldiers. They were not piled on top of one another in the vehicle but there was some overlapping because of lack of space . Lieutenant N did not make any physical examination of the bodies at the barricade but formed the opinion that they were dead from the colour of their faces.

1 B394

122.3 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Lieutenant N recorded that he received the order from Major Loden to collect the body or bodies from the barricade about two minutes after he had called his platoon back to their vehicles at the north end of Block 1.

1 B400

122.4 In his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,1 Lieutenant N was asked whether the bodies had been put into the vehicle in a deliberate way or quickly. He replied that the soldiers had loaded the bodies quite deliberately . He thought that three men had lifted each body and eased it into the vehicle. Lieutenant N said that he was sure that the bodies had not been piled on top of one another.2 They were not in such a position that any of them would have suffocated if he had not been dead. Lieutenant N did however think that one of the bodies had been lying face down. Lieutenant N was standing in the back of the APC when the bodies were loaded into it.

1 WT12.70-WT12.71

2 WT12.80-WT12.81

122.5 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Lieutenant N told us that he remembered giving cover to the soldiers who put the bodies into the vehicle, but could not now remember how they had moved the bodies. Firing had still been taking place at the time. He had been concerned for his own and his men’s safety, as they had been in an exposed position.

1 B438.012-B438.013

122.6 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Lieutenant N said that he was not sure whether all the soldiers who came to collect the bodies had gone forward in the vehicle or whether some had walked alongside it, but he thought that he had been in it. He said that he did not remember who had been driving the vehicle, although it should have been the same soldier as had driven it earlier on.2 Lieutenant N thought that three or four soldiers had come with him. He said that he had a recollection of seeing one of the bodies being put into the vehicle, but that he had not been watching the loading of the bodies closely because he had been more concerned with keeping watch out to the front .3 He said that the bodies were lifted into the vehicle. He rejected the suggestion that they were just taken by the hand and legs and shoved in . Once inside the vehicle, the bodies were not stacked vertically on top of one another but were sort of lying over each other . Lieutenant N said that when he and his men collected the bodies there was no firing near to them, but that there could have been firing elsewhere .4 While not in immediate danger, they felt that they were in a very exposed position. Lieutenant N said that the bodies were treated with respect and were not tossed into the vehicle like sacks of potatoes.

1 Day 323/87-88; Day 323/123

2 Day 322/104-105

3 Day 322/112-113

4 Day 323/34-40

122.7 Lieutenant N said that a photograph taken by Gilles Peress probably showed the vehicle stationary at the time when the bodies were being loaded into it.1 He had been standing by the nearside front door of the vehicle at that stage, and hence was not the soldier shown in the photograph crouching by the offside wing. It seems to us likely that two photographs taken by Fulvio Grimaldi show the vehicle after it had been reversed into the entrance to Glenfada Park North before being driven back up Rossville Street. We reproduce the relevant part of Gilles Peress’s photograph below,2 followed by those taken by Fulvio Grimaldi.

1 Day 323/90-92; Day 323/125

2 We have not reproduced below the foreground of this photograph, which shows close up the body of Bernard McGuigan, who had been shot in Sector 5, as we have described earlier in this report. The body by the corner of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats is that of Hugh Gilmour, previously shot in Sector 3. The body of Bernard McGuigan can be seen in Fulvio Grimaldi’s photographs.

122.8 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Fulvio Grimaldi said that he could not remember what the Army vehicle shown in the third of these photographs had been doing when he took the photograph.

1 Day 131/70

Sergeant O

122.9 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Sergeant O recorded that he gave cover while the bodies were collected from the rubble barricade.

1 B469

122.10 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Sergeant O told us that he walked beside Lieutenant N’s vehicle as it was driven to the barricade and watched as soldiers picked up the three bodies. The bodies were lying on the south side of the barricade in a pile with their heads facing north. It looked to Sergeant O as though they had been moved after they had been killed. He did not know which soldiers lifted the bodies and he had no clear recollection of how they were picked up. Later on, the bodies were removed from the vehicle at the mortuary at Altnagelvin Hospital head first. Sergeant O told us that he therefore assumed that they had been put into the vehicle feet first.

1 B575.119-B575.120

122.11 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Sergeant O said that he could not remember who had driven the vehicle to the barricade. He thought that some other soldiers had walked with him beside the vehicle but could not remember who they had been. Sergeant O could not say whether he was the soldier shown crouching by the offside wing of the vehicle in Gilles Peress’s photograph. This soldier can be seen in an enlarged portion of the photograph, as shown below.

1 Day 335/98-104

122.12 Sergeant O told us that he and other soldiers again walked beside the vehicle when it returned to the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. Sergeant O said that at this stage he walked backwards most of the way and was not aware of any firing during the operation to recover the bodies. Sergeant O said that he did not see the bodies being loaded into the vehicle.1

1 Day 336/80-81

Corporal P

122.13 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Corporal P told us that he did not put the bodies into the vehicle.

1 B623.002

122.14 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Corporal P said that he did not recall that he had taken any part in the operation to recover the bodies.

1 Day 353/5

Private Q

122.15 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private Q told us that he did not put the bodies into the vehicle.

1 B657.6

Lance Corporal V, Private R, Private S and Private T

122.16 None of these soldiers referred in their evidence to the collection of bodies from the rubble barricade.

Private U

122.17 In his second RMP statement,1 Private U recorded that an Army vehicle went forward to the rubble barricade and that three bodies were recovered from it. He did not say that he took any part in this operation.

1 B760

122.18 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry1 and in his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,2 Private U said that he remained in his position at the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats while the bodies were recovered. He said that he saw the bodies being removed from the barricade.3

1 B768-B769

2 WT13.100

3 WT14.8

122.19 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private U told us that the vehicle stopped at about the point marked F on the plan attached to his statement2 (in Rossville Street north of the barricade) with its rear facing the barricade. Soldiers picked up three bodies. Some civilians were shouting at the soldiers, telling them not to be disrespectful about the bodies , and trying to grab the soldiers. According to this account Private U stepped forward and interposed himself between the civilians and the soldiers carrying the bodies. He held out his arm to keep the civilians back. He told us that one of the bodies was carried face down. Two soldiers were holding the body beneath the arms and a third soldier was holding the thighs. Private U had a vivid picture in his mind of one of the bodies that was carried past him. This was the body of a young man who had been shot in the head. His lips were curled back, his teeth were showing and he seemed to have bitten through his tongue. Private U thought that a priest had been walking alongside the soldiers who were carrying the bodies.

1 B787.007

2 B787.038

122.20 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private U said that he did not see the bodies handled in a way that could have given onlookers the impression that they were being treated disrespectfully. His current recollection was that when he intervened between the civilians and the soldiers carrying the bodies he was still very close to the north end of Block 1. It was put to Private U that the body of which he had a vivid mental picture was that of John Young, and that in order to have seen John Young’s face Private U must either have assisted in putting his body into the vehicle, or been very close to the body when it was loaded into the vehicle, or entered the vehicle after the bodies had been loaded.2 However, Private U said that none of these suggestions was correct.

1 Day 369/101-102

2 Day 369/124-126

Private 006

122.21 In his RMP statement,1 Private 006 recorded that he was one of the soldiers who was ordered by Lieutenant N to collect three bodies from the rubble barricade. Lieutenant N went with them and they placed the bodies into the APC.

1 B1376

122.22 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 006 told us that either Sergeant O or Lieutenant N ordered him to get into a vehicle. He told us he thought that Private S had been the driver of the vehicle. According to his account Private 112 and possibly Private 013 and Private 017 were in the back; and the vehicle was driven through the gap in the barricade and then reversed up to the barricade, where the soldiers found three bodies and a man who had been wounded in the arm. After this man had said that one of the bodies was that of his son, one of the soldiers advised him to leave the barricade as otherwise he might ‘finish up like him’ . This was not a threat but a warning. The soldiers put the three bodies into the vehicle without searching them. Private 006 definitely picked up one or two of the bodies. He grabbed them by the ankles while another soldier grabbed them under their armpits. Private 006 told us he was not sure whether there was another soldier inside the vehicle who helped to pull them in. The bodies were placed one on top of another but Private 006 told us he could not recall exactly how. There was not enough room to lay them side by side. No shooting was taking place at the time, but Private 006 thought that the soldiers would be fired upon. He wanted to leave the barricade as soon as possible. When they returned to the waste ground, the soldiers had to sit with their feet on top of the bodies because of the lack of space in the back of the vehicle.

1 B1377.006-B1377.007

122.23 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private 006 said that the bodies were not put into the vehicle in a way that could have given onlookers the impression that they were being treated disrespectfully. The soldiers just picked ’em up and pulled ’em in . The soldiers had thought that they might be fired upon while they were at the barricade. Private 006 said that he thought that four or five other soldiers might have been involved in lifting the bodies.2 He denied that the bodies had been thrown into the vehicle.

1 Day 334/32

2 Day 334/65-68

Private 013

122.24 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 013 told us that he went forward to the barricade in a vehicle with Lieutenant N, the driver and another soldier, in order to collect the bodies. When he disembarked from the vehicle, Private 013 was certain that the soldiers would come under fire. He therefore held his rifle in one hand, intending to move the bodies with the other. When he found that he needed both hands to lift the bodies, he put his rifle on his back. No fire was in fact directed at the soldiers. Private 013 and one of the other soldiers, whose name Private 013 did not wish to give, lifted the bodies by their hands or wrists and put them into the vehicle. Alexander Nash was at the barricade and spoke to the soldiers, but Private 013 did not wish to say what Alexander Nash said. The first body lifted by Private 013 was that of William Nash. While the soldiers were moving the bodies, a crowd that had formed 50 to 100 yards away to the south jeered at them. Private 013 pointed his rifle at the crowd and told them to fuck off . The crowd dispersed. The soldiers then returned to the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats in the vehicle with the bodies.

1 B1408.004-B1408.005

122.25 Private 013 did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Private 017

122.26 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 017 told us that he did not know who had given the order for casualties to be recovered in a vehicle. He saw a soldier recovering a body at the rubble barricade, but he did not remember actually seeing the casualties and he did not see them being put into the vehicle. He thought that there had been civilians at the barricade when this happened. He did not remember any shooting at this stage. He was just observing. Later on he saw blood on the floor of the vehicle.

1 B1484.005

122.27 In his supplementary written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 017 told us that he was one of a number of soldiers interviewed by the author Max Arthur, but he denied that he was the private of 1 PARA who had been quoted in Max Arthur’s book Northern Ireland: Soldiers Talking (London: Sidgwick and Jackson, 1987)2 as having said that he was one of those who loaded the bodies into the vehicle.

1 B1484.023-B1484.024

2 B1484.027

122.28 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private 017 said that he took no part in the recovery of the bodies from the barricade.

1 Day 358/85

Private 019

122.29 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 019 told us that he saw the three bodies after they had been put into the vehicle. Two were lying side by side with the third on top of them. Their heads were towards the front of the vehicle and their feet towards the rear.

1 B1494.004

122.30 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private 019 said that he was not involved in the collection of the bodies from the rubble barricade.

1 Day 343/123-124

Captain 021

122.31 In his RMP statement,1 Captain 021 recorded that from his position on the roof of the Embassy Ballroom he saw soldiers remove three bodies from the rubble barricade in an APC and return to Eden Place.

1 B1504

122.32 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Captain 021 recorded that the soldiers lifted the bodies into the back of the vehicle, which was then driven further down Rossville Street, reversed and driven back to Eden Place.

1 B1508

122.33 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Captain 021 told us that he remembered seeing three bodies being put into an APC, but did not recall from where the vehicle had come or where it went, or any details of the bodies or the soldiers who handled them.

1 B1509.007

122.34 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Captain 021 said that he did not see the bodies being treated in a disrespectful manner as they were loaded into the APC. He said that he recalled nothing about the way in which the bodies were loaded.

1 Day 317/135-137

Captain 028

122.35 In his RMP statement,1 Captain 028 (the press officer of 22 Lt AD Regt) recorded that he saw four bodies lying behind the rubble barricade. An Army vehicle was driven to the barricade. Three of the bodies were loaded into the vehicle. Captain 028 stated that he did not see what happened to the fourth body. The vehicle was then driven away.

1 B1567

122.36 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Captain 028 recorded that a lot of firing was going on at this stage, and so the bodies were thrown into the back of the vehicle. In view of the situation the soldiers had to act quickly.

1 B1569.002

122.37 In his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,1 Captain 028 again said that firing was taking place when the vehicle pulled up at the barricade. The soldiers picked up the three bodies and put them into the vehicle.

1 WT17.57

122.38 In his written statement to this Inquiry1 and in his oral evidence to this Inquiry,2 Captain 028 said that he did not see the bodies being put into the vehicle, but saw them inside the vehicle at a later stage and formed the impression from their disordered state that they must have been thrown into the vehicle very hurriedly while the soldiers were under fire.

1 B1582.4; B1582.6-B1582.7

2 Day 356/104-108

122.39 We have expressed the view elsewhere in this report1 that it would be unwise to rely on the accounts given by Captain 028, though in the present context he was in our view describing how the bodies lay after Fr Irwin and Fr Mulvey had had to disturb them in order to anoint them, as we describe below.2

1 Paragraphs 85.78–82 2Paragraphs 122.129–141

Private 112

122.40 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 112 (a member of Mortar Platoon) told us that he was deployed in a vehicle to pick up some bodies. His recollection was that one body was collected from the rubble barricade and two from somewhere else, although he could not remember where. In each case, other soldiers carried the body to the vehicle while Private 112 and another soldier, whose name he could not recall, remained inside the vehicle. As Private 112 told us he remembered it, the bodies were not thrown into the vehicle but were loaded head first, and he took hold of each body under the arms and pulled it in. A priest nearby was shouting and complaining that the bodies were being manhandled. Private 112 now thought that this priest was Fr Daly but he did not know this at the time. The first two bodies were placed next to each other on the floor of the vehicle. The third body was placed on top of the first two because of lack of space.

1 B1732.006

122.41 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private 112 said that his memory of this incident was not very clear and that it was possible that all three bodies had been picked up from the barricade. He could not remember whether any shooting was taking place while the bodies were being loaded. He had no particular reason for his belief that the priest who had been complaining about the treatment of the bodies was Fr Daly. He told us that he saw nothing happen that could have caused onlookers to think that the bodies were not being treated with a proper degree of respect. Private 112 said that he had no recollection of feeling under threat as the bodies were collected.2 He said that he saw how the bodies were lifted and placed into the vehicle. He denied that the bodies were lifted by the wrists and ankles or that they were thrown into the vehicle. He said that he could not remember where in the vehicle the body of William Nash had been placed.3 Private 112 said that the other soldier who was in the vehicle with him, and who helped to pull the bodies in, might have been Private INQ 1918.4

1 Day 320/117-119

2 Day 320/146-148

3 Day 320/156-157

4 Day 320/162

Lance Bombardier 118

122.42 In his RMP statement,1 Lance Bombardier 118 recorded that, observing from his position on the roof of the Embassy Ballroom, he had seen paratroopers go forward to the rubble barricade in an APC, collect three bodies, and return to a position beside the Rossville Flats.

1 B1751

122.43 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Lance Bombardier 118 told us that he believed that he had seen three or four paratroopers removing three or four bodies. He thought that the soldiers had carried the bodies from the barricade to three-ton lorries parked around Eden Place and Pilot Row, although he was not sure about this. The bodies were carried to the vehicles by two soldiers, one holding the legs and one the arms. They were then placed into the vehicles by two soldiers, each holding one arm and one leg. The soldiers were throwing the bodies in like bits of wood and it looked pretty callous .

1 B1752.004-B1752.005

122.44 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Lance Bombardier 118 said that he had no recollection of seeing an APC being driven to the barricade to collect the bodies, but that it was possible that this was what had happened. He then said that bodies may have been thrown both into an APC at the barricade and into the three-ton lorries.2

1 Day 359/181-182

2 Day 359/200-203

Corporal 162

122.45 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Corporal 162 told us that he went on foot towards the rubble barricade with some other soldiers who may have included UNK 117 (Private INQ 768). Their task was to give cover to those who were moving the three bodies. According to his account, Corporal 162 would probably have been kneeling somewhere near the point marked B on the plan attached to his statement2 (the north side of the eastern part of the barricade). Before the bodies were lifted, they were lying side by side on their backs with their hands on their chests. They had definitely not fallen in that position. An APC was driven to the barricade. Corporal 162 thought that the vehicle had remained on the north side of the barricade. Corporal 162 could not recall how, or by which or how many soldiers, the bodies were put into the vehicle. After the bodies had been loaded, the vehicle was driven back to the area of the waste ground.

1 B1962.004

2 B1962.009

122.46 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Corporal 162 said that the way in which the bodies had lain before they were picked up by the soldiers suggested to him that someone had arranged them into a decent position. Corporal 162 said that he could not recall whether he had himself handled any of the bodies but that he thought that this was unlikely.2

1 Day 323/197-198

2 Day 323/223-224

Major Loden

122.47 In his statement made on 17th February 19721 and in his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,2 Major Loden said that before 1635 hours, when (according to him) he gave the order to cease firing, he ordered Lieutenant N to go forward with a vehicle to recover the bodies from the rubble barricade, and Lieutenant N did so.

1 B2222

2 WT12.13

122.48 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Major Loden told us that he now had only a very vague recollection that some paratroopers recovered bodies from the barricade.

1 B2283.009

122.49 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Major Loden said that he thought that Colonel Wilford had given him an order that the bodies were to be collected from the barricade. Major Loden could not say why the ambulance APC was not used for this operation. He said that he could not remember whether he had called for the ambulance APC by radio, nor did he have any recollection of its movements in Rossville Street.2

1 Day 347/21-23

2 Day 348/80-84

Lieutenant Colonel Wilford

122.50 In his undated 1972 statement1 and in his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,2 Colonel Wilford said that he had told Major Loden to send a vehicle forward to pick up bodies from the rubble barricade, but that Major Loden had already put this in hand.

1 B951

2 WT11.45

122.51 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Colonel Wilford told us that there were still incoming shots at the time when the soldiers went forward to collect the bodies, and that they did so at some risk. However, in his oral evidence to this Inquiry,2 Colonel Wilford said that he thought that this was a misunderstanding and that there had been no incoming fire at that time. He had a vague picture in his mind of the soldiers loading the bodies into the vehicle, but he could not be sure whether he had seen this happen.

1 B1110.035

2 Day 313/70-71

Private INQ 768

122.52 In his written statement to this Inquiry1 and in his oral evidence to this Inquiry,2 Private INQ 768 said that he could not remember how the bodies were loaded into the vehicle or whether he was involved. He did not remember going to a rubble barricade.

1 C768.5

2 Day 323/150-151; Day 323/165-167

Private INQ 1579

122.53 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private INQ 1579 told us that he saw soldiers lifting bodies from the rubble barricade. According to his account he could not remember where he was when he saw this but he was about 20m to 30m away. He thought that he had seen two bodies being lifted. The bodies appeared to be dead. He did not know which soldiers had lifted them. The soldiers put the bodies into the back of a vehicle. Private INQ 1579 could not recall how the soldiers had lifted the bodies, but assumed that two soldiers had lifted each body, holding it by the arms and legs. The bodies were not manhandled. Private INQ 1579 did not see the inside of the vehicle into which they were placed.

1 C1579.5

122.54 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private INQ 1579 said that he was not tasked to drive the vehicle to the barricade.

1 Day 336/170-171

Private INQ 1918

122.55 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private INQ 1918 told us that neither he nor Private 112 put the bodies into the vehicle.

1 C1918.3

122.56 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private INQ 1918 said that he did not recall seeing bodies thrown into the back of the vehicle like sacks of potatoes. He said that he had no recollection of going to the rubble barricade or picking up the bodies.2

1 Day 342/124

2 Day 342/133-135

Collection of the bodies from the rubble barricade: the evidence of civilian witnesses

Deirdre Barr

122.57 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Deirdre Barr told us that she was watching from her parents’ flat in Block 3 of the Rossville Flats with her sister Dolores MacFarland and others. She had a vague memory of seeing soldiers throwing what appeared to be a dead body or bodies head first into the back of an Army vehicle. One soldier held the body on each side by an arm and a leg. The vehicle was somewhere on the waste ground. The rear of the vehicle was facing towards Deirdre Barr.

1 AB13.1; AB13.6

122.58 Deirdre Barr did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry. She would not have been in a position to have seen bodies loaded into an APC at the rubble barricade.

John (Christopher) Barrett

122.59 In his interview with Kathleen Keville,1 John Barrett said that he saw soldiers drag three bodies away from the rubble barricade. They dragged one by the hair and two by the feet and threw them in the back of a truck.

1 AB21.3

122.60 John Barrett did not refer to the collection of the bodies in his written statement to this Inquiry.1

1 AB23.1-4

122.61 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 John Barrett said that he remembered that at least one vehicle had approached the barricade and that the bodies had been lifted, but he did not recall any further details.

1 Day 141/14-16

Marie Bradley

122.62 In her Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA) statement,1 Marie Bradley recorded that she and three other girls had gone into a flat in the Rossville Flats. She saw four soldiers disembark from the back of an Army vehicle and drag three dead bodies from the rubble barricade into the back of the vehicle. The soldiers got in beside the bodies and the vehicle was driven away.

1 AK39.5

122.63 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Marie Bradley, now Marie Kopiak, told us that she and her friends (Kathleen) Marie Doherty and Sheila Harrigan had run into a flat through a door about halfway along the lowest balcony in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. According to her account she saw an Army vehicle come south down Rossville Street and stop, facing south with its rear doors open. She could see inside the vehicle. Two soldiers lifted the three bodies into the vehicle in an ‘up and in’ movement. Each soldier took one hand and one foot of each body. Others in the flat commented that the soldiers were throwing the bodies in ‘like cattle’ . At the time, Marie Bradley did not know whether the bodies were dead or not. She could not picture the inside of the vehicle but did not think that the bodies had been put in one on top of another. The soldiers jumped into the back of the vehicle, which was then reversed into Glenfada Park North, turned and driven back up Rossville Street.

1 AK39.1-AK39.3

122.64 Marie Bradley did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

William Bridge

122.65 In his NICRA statement,1 William Bridge recorded that he saw three lifeless bodies at the rubble barricade. An Army vehicle approached. Soldiers disembarked from the vehicle and tossed the bodies into the back like coal into a bunker. They showed no respect and smiled over their dead.

1 AB85.1

122.66 William Bridge did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Kathleen Marie Doherty

122.67 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Kathleen Marie Doherty told us that she was watching from a flat in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats with her friends Marie Bradley, Sheila Harrigan and Nola McSwine. She saw soldiers drive an Army vehicle towards the rubble barricade. They grabbed two or three dead bodies from the barricade and threw them into the back of the vehicle. Kathleen Marie Doherty thought that the soldiers had done this in a callous way. She did not know where the bodies were taken.

1 AD77.1

122.68 Kathleen Marie Doherty did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Letty Donnelly

122.69 In her NICRA statement,1 Letty Donnelly recorded that she was in 6 Garvan Place. This was the third flat from the north end on the first floor of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats.2 Letty Donnelly stated that some time after she had seen the shooting of a boy, an Army vehicle came up to where the boy was lying. A man was shouting that the boy was his son. She saw a soldier drag the boy by the hair and fling him into the back of a vehicle. She saw two more boys being thrown into the back of the same vehicle, which then moved back along Rossville Street. She was certain that all three boys were dead.

1 AD125.14

2 GEN3.12

122.70 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Letty Donnelly told us that she learned later that the boy whose shooting she had seen was William Nash and that the man who had been shouting was Alexander Nash. According to her account, two soldiers picked up the body of William Nash, one by the hair and one by the feet, and threw it into the vehicle. While they were doing this, she was still able to hear Alexander Nash shouting that his son had been shot. The other two bodies were lying face down on top of one another, more or less on top of the rubble barricade. They were thrown into the vehicle in the same way, but Letty Donnelly was not sure whether the same soldiers had handled all three bodies.

1 AD125.2

122.71 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Letty Donnelly said that when the man was shouting that his son had been shot, he was pointing to the body of the boy whose shooting she had witnessed. The other bodies were not literally lying on top of one another, but were very close together. She said that the manner in which the soldiers handled the bodies was what had convinced her that all three must have been dead.2 She said that the bodies were flung into the vehicle like pieces of meat.3

1 Day 124/116-123

2 Day 124/125-126

3 Day 124/137-138

Albert Faulkner

122.72 In his NICRA statement,1 Albert Faulkner recorded that he saw three dead bodies being thrown into an Army vehicle beside the rubble barricade as if they were sacks of potatoes.

1 AF4.7

122.73 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Albert Faulkner told us that he saw the vehicle coming down Rossville Street. According to his account it stopped on the west side of the street just north of the barricade. No soldiers jumped out but about four soldiers had followed the vehicle on foot. These soldiers grabbed the three bodies and threw them into the vehicle as if they were sacks of potatoes. Two soldiers lifted each body, each holding it by one leg and one arm. Albert Faulkner thought that each body had been carried face down, and hence must have been thrown into the vehicle face down. It seemed that the soldiers wanted to get the bodies and themselves away from the area as soon as possible. The soldiers closed the doors of the vehicle, which was then reversed up Rossville Street. The soldiers returned on foot towards Kells Walk.

1 AF4.3

122.74 Albert Faulkner did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry, having died after making his written statement.

Bernard Feeney

122.75 In his interview with Kathleen Keville,1 the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps volunteer Bernard Feeney said that he treated a woman for shock after she had seen the three bodies being dragged to the Army vehicle. Bernard Feeney understood that the soldiers had treated the bodies like pigs but he did not see this himself.

1 AF8.35

122.76 In his NICRA statement,1 Bernard Feeney recorded that he and Fr Irwin went to see a woman in the Rossville Flats who was hysterical because she had seen three bodies being roughly handled and thrown into the back of an Army vehicle.

1 AF8.10

122.77 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Bernard Feeney said that the woman was screaming that she had seen three bodies thrown into the back of an Army vehicle.

1 AF8.5

122.78 In his interview with Stephen Gargan,1 Bernard Feeney said that the woman claimed to have seen three bodies being manhandled into the vehicle.

1 AF8.24

Ann Gallagher

122.79 In her interview with Kathleen Keville,1 Ann Gallagher said that there were three bodies lying behind the rubble barricade. She thought that they were all dead. Soldiers put them into an Army vehicle.

1 AG1.8

122.80 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Ann Gallagher told us that she saw three men thrown by soldiers into an Army vehicle at about the point marked E on the plan attached to the statement2 (the east side of Rossville Street near the north-west corner of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats). There were perhaps half a dozen soldiers standing by the open doors of the vehicle. Ann Gallagher had no recollection of seeing anyone being carried from the barricade and did not know whether these three men had been shot by the barricade. They were thrown into the vehicle like cattle but at the time she had thought that they were injured rather than dead. Two or three soldiers carried each man by the arms and legs. As they were carried, their upper bodies sagged close to the ground. Ann Gallagher could not recall whether the same soldiers had carried all three men. The men were thrown into the vehicle head first. The first man was thrown in face up and the second and third face down. Ann Gallagher knew from the way in which they were thrown into the vehicle that the men would be lying on top of one another.

1 AG1.3

2 AG1.7

122.81 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Ann Gallagher was unable to say why she now thought she had believed at the time that the men were injured rather than dead.

1 Day 401/24-26

Annie Gallagher and Elizabeth Fleming

122.82 In their joint NICRA statement,1 Annie Gallagher and Elizabeth Fleming recorded that they saw soldiers lifting two bodies from the rubble barricade by the legs. The soldiers dragged the bodies to an Army vehicle and threw them in.

1 AG2.1

122.83 Annie Gallagher is dead and did not give evidence to this Inquiry.

122.84 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Elizabeth Fleming told us that she saw perhaps a couple of soldiers disembark from the vehicle. They lifted three bodies from the barricade and threw them into the vehicle as if they were bags of potatoes. Elizabeth Fleming said that their joint NICRA statement contained Annie Gallagher’s account of what they saw rather than her own.

1 AF21.3-AF21.4

122.85 Elizabeth Fleming did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Eileen Gallagher

122.86 In her NICRA statement,1 Eileen Gallagher recorded that from her flat at 8 Garvan Place in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats she saw an Army vehicle approach the rubble barricade. Three bodies were taken from the barricade and thrown into the vehicle like dogs . One of the bodies, which was dressed in blue, was dragged by the feet face downwards and thrown into the vehicle. Another was dragged by the back of the neck, and the third was lifted + dumped in .

1 AG10.1-AG10.2

122.87 Eileen Gallagher is dead and did not give evidence to this Inquiry.

Margo Harkin

122.88 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Margo Harkin told us that an Army vehicle stopped at the point marked N on the plan attached to the statement2 (on the pavement on the west side of Rossville Street south of the south-east entrance to Glenfada Park North). According to her account there were two soldiers near the vehicle, who picked up three bodies from around the rubble barricade. Margo Harkin thought that both soldiers had lifted each body, perhaps by taking an arm and a leg each. The soldiers lifted the bodies as if they were carcasses or sacks of potatoes, and flung them casually into the vehicle. Margo Harkin believed at the time that one of the casualties was still alive when he was thrown into the vehicle. She thought that she may have believed this because the body was not limp like the others. There may have been a movement of the head or arm or something of the kind. This casualty was either the first or the second to be thrown into the vehicle. Margo Harkin remembered that a dead body was thrown on top of him. She was aghast because she thought that the soldiers should be trying to save his life and take him to the hospital. The vehicle was driven away but she did not know in which direction.

1 AH23.18

2 AH23.22

122.89 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Margo Harkin said that she thought that the man who she had believed was alive was the second to be thrown into the vehicle.

1 Day 416/35-36

Patricia Harkin

122.90 In her NICRA statement,1 Patricia Harkin said that she saw two men lying face down at the rubble barricade and a third man between them lying on his back. An Army vehicle pulled up beside them. Three or four soldiers picked the bodies up by the arms and legs and tossed them into the vehicle.

1 AC26.13

122.91 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Patricia Harkin, now Patricia Canning, told us that there were three soldiers around the vehicle, one of whom ordered the other two to put the bodies into the vehicle. The soldiers picked the bodies up like sacks. She seemed to recall that a fourth body was thrown into the vehicle but recalled no further details of this.

1 AC26.4

122.92 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Patricia Harkin confirmed this account and said that she saw no attempt by the soldiers to give first aid to the casualties.

1 Day 121/177-178; Day 121/186-187

Sheila Harrigan

122.93 In her NICRA statement,1 Sheila Harrigan did not describe the collection of the bodies from the rubble barricade.

1 AF41.3

122.94 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Sheila Harrigan, now Sheila Fullerton, told us that she was in a flat in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats with her friends Marie Bradley, Kathleen Marie Doherty and Nola McSwine. According to her account, she saw soldiers throwing three bodies from the barricade one by one into the back of an Army vehicle. She recalled thinking that the bodies were not really dead. Fr Mulvey was waving at the soldiers but they did not respond. She was squealing that the men might not be dead and that they would not be able to breathe. The soldiers showed them no mercy.

1 AF41.1-AF41.2

122.95 Sheila Harrigan did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Monica Hegarty

122.96 In her NICRA statement,1 Monica Hegarty recorded that she saw three boys, one lying on his back and two on their faces. A priest was kneeling beside them, attending to them. She did not know that they were dead. An Army vehicle came forward and over the rubble barricade. Two soldiers disembarked quickly, grabbed the boys by the arms and legs and threw them into the vehicle.

1 AH63.7

122.97 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Monica Hegarty told us that she vaguely recalled this incident. She thought that the soldiers had grabbed the men by the arms but was not sure about this.

1 AH63.3

122.98 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Monica Hegarty, now Monica Whoriskey, said that she could not now recollect the incident.

1 Day 99/143

Frank Lawton

122.99 In his NICRA statement,1 Frank Lawton recorded that an Army vehicle came forward and removed three men, who appeared to be dead, from the rubble barricade. The vehicle returned to its position. Nothing was picked up from beside the bodies. A shoe belonging to one of the men was left behind.

1 AL6.20

122.100 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Frank Lawton recorded that two soldiers lifted the bodies, each using one hand for this purpose and the other to hold his rifle. They tossed the bodies into the back of the vehicle. One of the soldiers waved Alexander Nash away.

1 AL6.22

122.101 In his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,1 Frank Lawton said that before the vehicle arrived Alexander Nash had been pulling at the three bodies to get them tighter in . Alexander Nash beckoned to the vehicle to come down and it did so. It rammed the wooden barrier that blocked the gap in the barricade. The paratroopers lifted the three bodies. Frank Lawton did not hear the conversation between Alexander Nash and one of the soldiers but his general impression was that the soldier was waving him away.

1 WT6.79

122.102 In John Goddard’s interview notes,1 Frank Lawton is recorded as having said that four or five soldiers threw the bodies into the vehicle, each holding a wrist and a leg. The bodies were thrown in LIKE PIECES OF MEAT .

1 O8.13

122.103 In his interview with Tony Stark,1 Frank Lawton said that so far as he could remember the soldiers took hold of the bodies by an arm and a leg , while still holding their rifles, and manhandled the bodies into the vehicle, which had reversed towards the barricade and still had its engine running. The soldiers might have held the bodies by the hands, wrists, elbows or arms.

1 O8.7-O8.9

122.104 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Frank Lawton told us that about three or four soldiers disembarked from the back of the vehicle. Two of them threw the three bodies unceremoniously head first into the vehicle, lifting them by one leg and either the armpit, the scruff of the neck or the clothing on the upper part of the body. Each soldier used only one arm to lift the bodies and held his rifle in the other arm. Frank Lawton did not see any of the bodies being lifted by the hands or hair. He saw no sign of life in any of the bodies.

1 AL6.5

122.105 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Frank Lawton said that it was clear to him that the three men were dead when their bodies were picked up.

1 Day 389/129-130

Dolores MacFarland

122.106 Dolores MacFarland did not refer to the collection of the bodies in her NICRA statement.

122.107 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Dolores MacFarland told us that she was watching from her mother’s flat in Block 3 of the Rossville Flats with her sister Deirdre Barr and others. She saw an Army vehicle parked at the north end of Block 1. She thought that there had been two soldiers with the vehicle. They were throwing bodies into the back of it. One soldier took each body by the arms and the other took hold of the legs. They made a ‘one, two, three, heave swinging motion’” and threw the bodies in as if they were pigs . Dolores MacFarland could not remember how many bodies there had been. They all appeared to be male. They were thrown into the vehicle facing upwards. Dolores MacFarland assumed that they were all dead.

1 AM8.1; AM8.4

122.108 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Dolores MacFarland said that the bodies were thrown into the vehicle head first. She said that she had seen this incident herself. It was suggested to her that she might have been told about it by someone else, but she said that she did not remember that happening. She said that she had probably forgotten to mention the incident when she made her NICRA statement. From her position in Block 3 of the Rossville Flats, Dolores MacFarland could not have seen the collection of the bodies from the rubble barricade.

1 Day 83/97-100

William McDonagh

122.109 In his NICRA statement,1 William McDonagh recorded that he saw three youths at the rubble barricade. One of them was obviously dead. He was not sure about the second. The third was wounded and was waving a white handkerchief. An Army vehicle approached the barricade with two or three soldiers walking behind it. Two of the soldiers were laughing at the bodies at the barricade. The soldiers had no respect for the dead. One of the soldiers grabbed one of the bodies by the collar and the other by the belt. The bodies were then thrown into the vehicle.

1 AM192.7

122.110 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 William McDonagh told us that he was watching from his girlfriend’s flat in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. According to his account, he saw an Army vehicle move south down Rossville Street and stop at about the point marked M on the plan attached to the statement2 (the west kerb of Rossville Street north of the barricade). He also saw two soldiers carrying a body. He thought that the soldiers had come from the vehicle. They were laughing. One of them was holding the body by the front or stomach region . They threw the body into the back of the vehicle, feet first. William McDonagh had earlier seen two men at the barricade who appeared to have been shot and a third man who seemed to be waving a handkerchief, but he did not know whether the body carried to the vehicle was that of any of these men. William McDonagh could hear the sound of at least two people crying or groaning, as if seriously hurt. It sounded as though those crying were male. William McDonagh had the impression that the cries were coming from the Army vehicle.

1 AM192.4-AM192.5

2 AM192.8

122.111 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 William McDonagh said that although he did not see the soldiers pick up the body he was almost sure that it had come from the barricade. One of the soldiers held the body by the collar and the other held it by the belt. He only saw one body being moved, and not two as suggested in his NICRA statement. He could not give a description of the body. He could not say definitely whether the body was dead or alive, although it had been his impression that it was dead. However, he knew that he had heard groans and cries from the vehicle after the body had been thrown into it. He said that there were people in that Saracen that were not dead .

1 Day 119/44-47; Day 119/69-73

George McGinley

122.112 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 George McGinley told us that he saw two Army vehicles being reversed down Rossville Street towards the rubble barricade. According to his account the vehicles stopped on the north side of the barricade. Two or three soldiers appeared at the rear doors of the vehicle that had stopped closer to Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. George McGinley was not sure whether they had disembarked from the cab or from the rear of the vehicle. He did not think that the soldiers had been carrying rifles but he was not sure about this. George McGinley then noticed two or possibly three people lying on the ground on the south side of the barricade. One of the soldiers tried to drag one of the bodies over the barricade towards the vehicle that had stopped closer to Block 1. George McGinley thought that the soldier had tried to lift the body by holding it beneath the arms, but it must have been too heavy for him, as another soldier had to help him. The two soldiers each took one arm and one leg, and threw the body into the back of the vehicle like a sack of coal. The two soldiers then repeated the process with the remaining body or bodies. They then climbed back into the vehicle, which was driven away to the north. George McGinley thought that its rear doors had still been open as it was driven away. The other vehicle remained where it was. The whole incident lasted only a minute or two.

1 AM238.4

122.113 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 George McGinley said that he was not absolutely sure that there had been two vehicles, and that it was possible that the vehicle had come through the barricade and reversed up to its south side.

1 Day 134/29-30

Kevin McGonagle

122.114 In a written statement submitted to the Widgery Inquiry,1 Kevin McGonagle recorded that as he watched from a house in Joseph Place he saw an Army vehicle approach the rubble barricade. Soldiers lifted the apparently lifeless bodies of two youths from the south side of the barricade into the vehicle.

1 AM254.20

122.115 In his interview with John Barry,1 Kevin McGonagle said that the soldiers lifted the two bodies really casually and dumped them in the vehicle.

1 AM254.22.3

122.116 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Kevin McGonagle told us that two or three soldiers lifted the bodies and threw them into the vehicle. They did not treat the bodies with respect. They lifted them by an arm and leg . Kevin McGonagle thought that he had seen one of the soldiers lift one of the bodies by himself. The soldiers did not check the bodies but just put them quickly into the vehicle. Kevin McGonagle did not know whether any of the casualties had been alive. He could not remember how many bodies he had seen thrown into the vehicle.

1 AM254.11

122.117 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Kevin McGonagle said that the vehicle moved south of the barricade. At first he said that the rear doors were facing the position where the bodies were lying, but then he said that he thought that the rear of the vehicle had been facing towards Free Derry Corner. Kevin McGonagle believed that he had seen two bodies being thrown into the vehicle. He thought that one soldier had picked up one of the bodies on his own, lifting it by an arm and a leg, and that the other body had been handled in much the same way but by two soldiers.

1 Day 128/197-201

Nola McSwine

122.118 In her NICRA statement,1 Nola McSwine, now Nola McCullagh, recorded that the soldiers picked up the dead bodies of three boys from the rubble barricade and threw them into an Army vehicle like raw meat .

1 AM157.9

122.119 In her interview with Paul Mahon,1 Nola McSwine said that she did not know whether the casualties had been dead or alive. According to this account, two soldiers lifted the body lying furthest to the west, each taking one arm, and dragged it over to the vehicle. They then grasped the legs and threw the body into the vehicle head first and face down. Nola McSwine said to her friend Sheila Harrigan that the soldiers were going to hurt the casualties if they were still alive. The two soldiers then lifted the body that had been lying in the middle of the three, and put it into the vehicle head first and face up. The same two soldiers then dragged the last body by the arms and put it into the vehicle. Nola McSwine thought that this body had been dragged face down but she was not sure about this. The soldiers then went into the back of the vehicle with the bodies and closed the doors. The vehicle was then turned and driven back towards William Street.

1 X4.23.49-X4.23.55

122.120 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Nola McSwine told us that she was in a flat in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats with her friends Marie Bradley, Kathleen (Marie) Doherty and Sheila Harrigan. She saw an Army vehicle driven through the barricade and parked parallel to the barricade facing Block 1. She thought that six soldiers had disembarked from the vehicle. The driver appeared to stay in his seat. Two soldiers took hold of each of the three bodies. She thought that each soldier had taken a hand or wrist and a foot or ankle. The soldiers threw or heaved the bodies into the vehicle. Nola McSwine could not believe that the soldiers were treating the dead so disrespectfully. The vehicle was then reversed and turned, and driven back up Rossville Street.

1 AM157.1-AM157.6

122.121 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Nola McSwine said that none of the soldiers attempted to examine any of the three bodies to see whether they were still alive.

1 Day 136/134-135

Olive Mottram

122.122 In her NICRA statement,1 Olive Mottram recorded that she saw an Army vehicle pass through the rubble barricade and pull up. A soldier disembarked, grabbed the arm of one of the bodies lying behind the barricade, dragged the body across to the vehicle, and threw it in just like a sack of meat . The soldier did the same with the other two bodies.

1 AM441.13

122.123 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Olive Mottram told us that she could not recall seeing the vehicle approaching. According to her account, the vehicle was parked on the kerb near the south-east corner of Glenfada Park North. The soldier was blond and was not wearing a helmet. He leaned his rifle against the back of the vehicle. There were three bodies on the north side of the barricade. The soldier dragged one of the bodies across the barricade to the vehicle, lifting it by the arm and leg, and threw it into the vehicle. Olive Mottram heard the thud as it hit one of the sides of the vehicle. The soldier did this by himself. He then did the same with the other two bodies, treating all of them with complete contempt. He might as well have been picking rubble from the barricade and throwing it into the back of the vehicle.

1 AM441.6

122.124 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Olive Mottram said that she could not remember whether the soldier who collected the bodies had been accompanied by any others.

1 Day 136/88-90

Alexander Nash

122.125 In a statement dated 7th February 1972 found in the collection made by the Irish Government,1 Alexander Nash (who was wounded at the rubble barricade, as we have described earlier in this report2) recorded that while he was at the rubble barricade an Army vehicle arrived, two big soldiers disembarked from it, and one of them said ‘3 more dead bodies’ . They lifted the three bodies one by one, pulled them to the vehicle, placed them on top of one another and locked the door. The vehicle was then driven away.

1 AN1.14-AN1.15 2Paragraphs 86.470–607

122.126 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Alexander Nash recorded that the soldiers threw the bodies into the vehicle.

1 AN1.10

122.127 In his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,1 Alexander Nash said that the soldiers dragged the bodies to the vehicle and threw them in one on top of another. They did not examine them to check whether they were dead. Alexander Nash said that the soldier in charge did not examine him or ask whether he was all right.2

1 WT8.5

2 WT8.9

122.128 In his deposition for the coroner’s inquest into the death of William Nash,1 Alexander Nash said that he saw the soldiers put the three bodies into the vehicle.

1 AN1.12

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital: the evidence of priests

Fr John Irwin

122.129 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Fr Irwin recorded that he was on the balcony on the second floor of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats when a woman in a distraught state told him that she had seen three bodies being thrown into an Army vehicle. He rushed down the back stairs of the flats into Rossville Street, accompanied by an Order of Malta Ambulance Corps volunteer. A soldier was standing at the entrance to the back stairs. Fr Irwin asked him whether there were three bodies in one of the vehicles. The soldier said that he did not know. Fr Irwin asked him who was in charge. He nodded towards a group of soldiers a few feet away. Fr Irwin shouted to that group, asking who was in charge. One came forward who was wearing a red beret and was presumably an officer. Fr Irwin asked him whether he had any dead or injured in a vehicle. The officer replied that none of his soldiers had been injured. Fr Irwin said ‘I didn’t ask you about your soldiers. I’m asking you if you have any dead or injured bodies in one of the saracens as I wish to anoint them.’ The officer said ‘No we haven’t’ ”.

1 H9.5-6

122.130 According to this account, Fr Irwin and the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps volunteer returned upstairs and met the woman who had told them about the bodies. When Fr Irwin told her that the officer had denied that there were any bodies in a vehicle, she took him to the window of a flat overlooking Rossville Street and pointed out the vehicle. Fr Irwin and the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps volunteer rushed downstairs again. Fr Irwin shouted to the officer that there were three bodies in a vehicle. Fr Irwin saw Fr Mulvey a short distance beyond the officer and told him about the bodies. The two priests and the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps volunteer ran towards the vehicle. The officer followed them and opened the door of the vehicle, revealing three bodies piled one on top of another. Fr Irwin climbed into the vehicle and anointed the body of William Nash, which was lying on top of the other two bodies, and the body of Michael McDaid which was lying face outwards in the middle. Fr Irwin then held up those two bodies to enable Fr Mulvey to anoint the body of John Young, which was lying beneath the other two in a pool of blood. John Young would have been smothered if he had been alive. It was obvious from the way in which the bodies were lying that they had been flung into the vehicle like bags of potatoes. When Fr Irwin climbed out of the vehicle he accused the officer of lying to him. The officer shrugged his shoulders and smirked. As the two priests and the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps volunteer were leaving the vehicle, a senior Order of Malta Ambulance Corps officer ran up to see whether any of the three casualties was still alive, but the door of the vehicle was slammed shut and the Army officer told him that he could not go into it.

122.131 In an article published in the Sunday Press on 6th February 1972,1 Fr Irwin was quoted as saying that the soldier whom he accused of lying about the bodies had been a Sergeant. Fr Irwin said that the woman pointed out the vehicle in Rossville Street when he came back upstairs after making his initial inquiries of the soldiers. According to the article, Fr Irwin said that the lowest body was the body of William Nash and that the body of Michael McDaid was lying on top of the other two.

1 L176

122.132 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Fr Irwin told us that he now knew that the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps volunteer had been Bernard Feeney. According to this account, he thought that the woman had taken him into the flat and directed his attention to the vehicle in Rossville Street before he went downstairs for the first time. He then went downstairs to the vehicle. A soldier was standing guard at the rear door of the vehicle. This soldier was quite tall, not more than 25 years old, and was wearing a red beret. He appeared extremely frightened. Fr Irwin said that he believed that there were three bodies in the vehicle. The soldier said ‘no’ ”. Fr Irwin thought that it was at this stage that he had asked who was in charge. The soldier who Fr Irwin assumed was an officer stepped forward.

1 H9.12-H9.16

122.133 When Fr Irwin asked whether there were bodies in the vehicle, the officer said that there were not. Fr Irwin went back upstairs, spoke again to the woman, and returned to the vehicle. He repeated to the soldier guarding the door that he believed that there were bodies in the vehicle. The soldier did not reply. Fr Irwin told the soldier that he was going to open the door. Another soldier, probably the officer, told Fr Irwin that if he did this he would be shot. There were several soldiers around when this happened. Fr Irwin was aware of a television camera which he thought was recording the altercation. He then saw Fr Mulvey and shouted to him that there were three bodies in the vehicle, that he was going to open the door and that the soldiers had said that they would shoot him if he did. Fr Irwin recalled that Fr Mulvey had replied that in that case the soldiers would have to shoot them both.

122.134 The soldier guarding the vehicle then moved aside and the back door was opened. A photograph taken by Constable A Brown of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) shows the two priests at about the time when this happened.

122.135 Fr Irwin told us that John Young’s body was lying face down with the head towards the front of the vehicle, beneath the other two bodies. The body of Michael McDaid was lying in the middle, with the head towards the rear of the vehicle, so that his face was visible when the door was opened. The third body was lying on top of the other two. All three were dead. Fr Irwin’s current recollection was that he had anointed the bodies, starting with that of John Young. It had been necessary for him to step on and over the bodies to reach John Young, and for him and Fr Mulvey to man handle the boys a lot to be able to do our work . When Fr Irwin climbed out of the vehicle, he told the soldier who had threatened to shoot him that he had lied to him about there being no bodies in the vehicle. The soldier smirked at him. Fr Irwin was unaware of any incident in which a soldier fired a weapon into the vehicle containing the bodies.

122.136 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Fr Irwin said that the soldier by the door of the vehicle had appeared more confused than frightened. Fr Irwin no longer recalled the arrival of a senior Order of Malta Ambulance Corps officer who was told by the Army officer that he could not enter the vehicle. Fr Irwin could not say whether the photograph shown above had been taken before or after he and Fr Mulvey had been to the vehicle, although later in his evidence he agreed that it was probably taken when they were approaching the vehicle with Bernard Feeney.2 Fr Irwin said that he could not say whether the soldier shown on the right in the photograph was the officer who had initially denied that there were bodies in the vehicle.3

1 Day 153/8-18

2 Day 153/32-37

3 Day 153/41-42

122.137 Asked to comment on the account attributed to him in the Sunday Press article, Fr Irwin said1 that he knew the location of the vehicle containing the bodies when he went downstairs for the first time. He had no means of knowing whether the soldier who appeared to be in charge was a Sergeant. The body of John Young had been lying lowest in the vehicle, the body of Michael McDaid in the middle, and the third body on top.

1 Day 153/44-45

Fr Vincent Anthony Mulvey

122.138 In his filmed interview with Gerald Seymour,1 Fr Mulvey was asked how many dead he had seen in the Bogside. He replied that he did not know whether the three bodies in the Army vehicle were alive or dead, but that they seemed to be very dead and that there were probably about four others who were dead. The bodies had been thrown into the vehicle as if they were dead meat.

1 Vid 3 06.12

122.139 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Fr Mulvey recorded that someone told him that soldiers had thrown three bodies into an Army vehicle. He went to the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats where he found three or four vehicles and a group of 12 to 15 soldiers, including one wearing a red beret. Gerald Seymour and his camera crew were also present. Fr Mulvey demanded to know where the bodies were and by what right the soldiers had taken them. No-one answered. Fr Mulvey asked who was in charge. A soldier wearing a helmet said that he was. Fr Mulvey again asked where the bodies were but received no reply. He then heard Fr Irwin calling out that they were in the vehicle furthest away from Fr Mulvey. The two priests ran to the vehicle. The soldier at the door opened it and the priests saw three bodies lying on top of one another between the seats. The youth on top was lying face up with his head towards the door. He was unconscious and possibly dead.

1 H15.12-H15.13

122.140 According to this account, Fr Irwin attended to the upper two bodies while Fr Mulvey tried to reach the lowest body. It was necessary to lift the upper two bodies in order to locate the head and face of the body beneath them, which was lying face down in a pool of blood. Fr Mulvey had to grope to find his face. Fr Mulvey thought that this man might have suffocated if he were not already dead. Fr Mulvey returned to the soldiers to protest about the condition of the three men who were not necessarily dead. Gerald Seymour then interviewed Fr Mulvey on camera about the number of people who had been killed. The Order of Malta Ambulance Corps officer Leo Day then arrived. Fr Mulvey called to him to look at the bodies and went with him to the vehicle. The soldier by the vehicle would have opened it but the officer or non-commissioned officer wearing a helmet called to the soldier to close the door immediately and not to open it again. The entire incident occupied about five minutes.

122.141 In his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,1 Fr Mulvey said that he had been told that the body lying on top of the other two was the body of Michael McDaid. Fr Mulvey had not known whether any of the bodies was dead, although they all appeared to be unconscious and probably dead. Fr Mulvey said that when he left the vehicle he made a remark about the fact that he had not been told that there were bodies there. He also asked the soldier who had opened the door where the weapons were with which the casualties had supposedly been armed, but he received no reply.

1 WT4.28-WT4.29

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital: the evidence of Order of Malta Ambulance Corps witnesses

Leo Day

122.142 In his notes of his interview of the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps officer Leo Day,1 Philip Jacobson of the Sunday Times Insight Team recorded him as saying that his colleague Alice Long came up to him in a very distressed state when he was near the telephone kiosk at the south end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. She said that she had asked the paratroopers to let ambulances through but that they had laughed and refused. Leo Day and Alice Long then crossed the rubble barricade and spoke to an officer of the Parachute Regiment. Leo Day thought that this officer had been a Major. The officer ordered that an ambulance should be allowed through. A woman then approached Leo Day and told him that there were three bodies in the back of an APC and that one of them might still be alive. Leo Day went back to the same officer and asked whether he and Alice Long might check to see whether anyone was still breathing. The officer agreed. Leo Day and Alice Long went to the vehicle. A Sergeant opened the door. All that Leo Day could see was a tangle of bodies lying on each other with blood all over the floor. He tried to get into the vehicle, putting one foot onto the step, but the Sergeant said that no-one was allowed inside the vehicle, and pushed the door shut again. The plan accompanying the interview notes2 indicates that when this happened the vehicle was in the middle of Rossville Street near the turning leading to the car park of the Rossville Flats.

1 AD13.3

2 AD13.5

122.143 Leo Day is dead and did not give evidence to this Inquiry.

Alice Long

122.144 In a statement dated 4th February 1972 found in the collection made by the Irish Government,1 Alice Long recorded that a man standing in a passage near Glenfada Park told Leo Day that there were civilians in an APC. He gave the impression that they were hurt. Leo Day said that as Alice Long was wearing a white coat she should go with him to see what could be done for the civilians. She accompanied Leo Day into Rossville Street and with their hands in the air they approached some soldiers at the end of the passage. Alice Long and Leo Day asked whether there was anything that they could do to help the soldiers or the civilians. When the soldiers said that there was not, they went across the rubble barricade to the south side of the Rossville Flats. Some time later, Leo Day was standing at the rubble barricade and called to Alice Long to come with him to try to get help from the Army.

1 AL37.12-AL37.15

122.145 According to this account, Alice Long and Leo Day went to the soldiers on the waste ground. Leo Day asked to see an officer. There was no reply from the soldiers. A photographer had approached Leo Day and asked whether he needed any help. Leo Day said that stretchers were needed and explained that there were casualties requiring transport. At this point Leo Day noticed three soldiers guarding an APC. He asked to see who was inside it. A soldier opened the door. An officer appeared and shouted not to let anyone come near the APC. The soldier closed the door again. Alice Long caught a glimpse of three bodies lying in a heap inside the vehicle. The body on top was that of a person wearing a “light coloured coat” who appeared to have been wounded in the face. The lowest body was that of a man whose head was thrown back with the mouth open. Blood seemed to be pouring from the back of his head or neck. Alice Long and Leo Day turned away. Fr Mulvey and Fr Bradley had arrived and also wanted to reach the civilians in the APC. Leo Day made some more inquiries about assistance. Alice Long picked up three empty cartridge cases from the ground. A soldier approached and made her hand them over. Alice Long and Leo Day then left.

122.146 Fr Denis Bradley did not in any of his evidence say that he had attempted to reach the bodies in the vehicle with Fr Mulvey. However, in his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Bernard Feeney identified the two priests shown walking north through the barricade in Sam Gillespie’s photograph (shown below) as Fr Bradley and Fr Mulvey. Bernard Feeney also identified the man shown in the same photograph standing near the Ferret scout car and holding a white bag as Leo Day.

1 Day 141/60-61

122.147 In her undated report to the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps,1 Alice Long described the first visit that she and Leo Day made to the soldiers but did not say that at that stage they had been told that there were civilians in an APC. She said that later on Leo Day called to her to come with him to see whether they could get help from the Army. Leo Day asked the soldiers for help but received no answer. He then saw an APC with soldiers standing outside it. Leo Day asked whether there was anyone in the vehicle whom they could help. A soldier opened the door. Alice Long and Leo Day caught a glimpse of three bodies inside the vehicle but the soldier closed the door again after a short time.

1 AD50.32-AD50.35

122.148 Philip Jacobson’s notes of his interview of Alice Long1 do not mention an initial visit to the soldiers in Rossville Street by her and Leo Day, nor is such a visit indicated on the accompanying plan.2 However, the notes record Alice Long as having said that Leo Day called her to go with him to two bodies outside abbey park . Later on, according to the notes, a woman told Alice Long that there were three bodies in an APC standing about 15 yards north of the rubble barricade. Leo Day had also heard about this. Together they approached an officer and asked whether they could see whether anyone was alive. The officer agreed and shouted to a Sergeant to open the doors. The Sergeant did so but then slammed them shut again, saying that no-one was to see the bodies. Alice Long had a clear glimpse of the inside of the vehicle. The uppermost body was that of a young man with quite short sandy hair. He was wearing a “light coloured jacket ” and had a wound in the left cheek. There were pools of blood on the floor of the vehicle. Alice Long could see no sign of movement in any of the bodies, which were just jumbled in like lumps of meat . As she was walking back towards the entrance to the Rossville Flats, she picked up two spent cartridges but a soldier saw her and told her to give them to him.

1 AL37.7-AL37.9

2 AL37.10

122.149 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Alice Long, now Alice Doherty, told us that she met Leo Day at the point marked D on the plan attached to her statement2 (in Rossville Street at the north-east entrance to Glenfada Park North). A male bystander told them that there were three casualties inside an APC parked half on and half off the road at the point marked E (on the south side of the turning leading to the car park of the Rossville Flats. At this point Alice Long heard high-pitched shots being fired. She saw several soldiers kneeling on the waste ground and at Kells Walk aiming their rifles towards the barricade. She and Leo Day went across to the APC with their hands in the air. Leo Day told her to walk in front because she was wearing a white coat. Fr Mulvey joined them. Alice Long thought that he had been standing at the corner of Glenfada Park North. Another priest was also there, but remained further behind. Alice Long told us she thought that this was Fr Irwin.

1 AD50.2-AD50.4

2 AD50.29

122.150 A very small and quite stout soldier was standing by the rear doors of the APC. He was perhaps 5ft 4in tall. He was shorter than Alice Long. Unlike about seven other soldiers standing nearby, this soldier did not have Parachute Regiment insignia on his uniform. His face was partly blackened and he had a scar high on his cheek. Alice Long did not think that the soldier had had a moustache. He was wearing a bulletproof jacket. Alice Long thought that he was wearing a helmet with a visor attached to it, and that he was armed with a rifle and a baton gun. Leo Day asked the small soldier whether there was anything that he and Alice Long could do to help. The soldier replied in an English accent that there was not. The door of the APC was partly open. Leo Day and Alice Long glimpsed three bodies inside, piled on top of one another like meat. The body on top was that of a boy with sandy hair, wearing a check sports jacket and grey trousers. She could not see the middle body. The lowest body was that of a boy whose jacket appeared to have been pulled over his head, as though he had been shot in the head. Alice Long thought that the jacket was black. She could not see his face. This body seemed to have been pushed further back into the APC than the others.

122.151 Alice Long stated that all three bodies were lying with their feet towards the rear doors of the vehicle. There was a strong smell of CS gas inside the vehicle. Alice Long did not know whether by this stage Fr Mulvey had already tried to gain access to the vehicle, but she thought that Fr Mulvey had asked to be allowed to give the last rites to the young men in the APC, and that the small soldier had replied that this was unnecessary. According to this account Alice Long then heard a moaning sound from inside the vehicle. She reached forward and pulled the door open. The small soldier immediately kicked it shut. Alice Long thought that he might have done this on the order of an officer nearby, but could not be sure. She immediately opened the door of the vehicle again, and saw one of the feet of the lowest boy twitch slightly. Leo Day also saw this, and he or Alice Long or both of them said words to the effect that the boy was still alive.

122.152 The small soldier then kicked the door shut again and told Alice Long and Leo Day that they were not allowed to look inside. Then he lifted his rifle, poked the barrel through an open flap on the offside of the vehicle, which Alice Long thought was the rearmost flap on that side, and fired three shots into the vehicle. He had to hold the rifle high so that he could aim it downwards. He then said “something like ‘They’re dead now or ‘They’ll not make any more noise now ’. He seemed very pleased with himself and said triumphantly, That’s the end of the Fenian bastards’.” Alice Long then picked up two bullet cases on the ground. They were split wide open like flowers and she thought that they were dum dum bullets . The small soldier cocked his rifle and told her to give them to him, saying something like ‘You’ll be the next casualty if you don’t give them back’ . Leo Day told her to return them and so she did. As she and Leo Day were about to leave, the small soldier shouted something like ‘We’re not finished with the Fenian bastards’ . Alice Long did not see any photographers near the vehicle, nor did she see her colleague Bernard Feeney. Alice Long said that she only visited the APC on one occasion.1

1 AD50.9

122.153 Alice Long also told us that at an Order of Malta Ambulance Corps meeting on 7th February 1972, Leo Day asked all those attending to make written statements to record what they had seen.1 He then took Alice Long aside and asked her to omit any reference to the small soldier shooting into the APC or to the possibility that one of the men inside the vehicle might still have been alive. Leo Day told her that the moan and the movement of the foot could have been a post-mortem reflex and that even if the boy had been alive, there was nothing that he and Alice Long could have done to help. Leo Day told her that the families had suffered enough pain already and that it would serve no good purpose to disclose this evidence. Alice Long agreed and tried to wipe the incident from her mind. She never discussed it again with Leo Day, nor did she ever discuss it with any of her other colleagues in the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps, or with Fr Mulvey.

1 AD50.3; AD50.8-AD50.9

122.154 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Alice Long said that she did not locate the source of the high-pitched shots that she heard, and did not make any connection between those shots and the soldiers she saw in the waste ground and at Kells Walk. On being shown one of Robert White’s photographs of the group around the body of Michael Kelly at the barricade (which we have shown when discussing the shooting of Michael Kelly earlier in this report2), she said that the boy at the back of the photograph in a tweed coat (Michael McDaid) definitely looked like one of the casualties she had seen in the vehicle. Asked why she thought that an officer might have given an order for the small soldier to shut the doors of the vehicle, Alice Long said some sort of an order was given but there was so much shouting and roaring going on at the time that it had been difficult to understand. The soldiers themselves seemed to be confused about what they wanted to be done. Some wanted to get the vehicle away and others were just holding on .

1 Day 135/164-179

2 Paragraph 86.4

122.155 Alice Long said that Fr Mulvey and Fr Irwin had both heard the moaning and had both maintained that there was movement in one of the bodies . She said that the body
in the middle appeared to have some sort of a cut on his face , but that this was not necessarily a gunshot wound and she did not see any other wounds. She no longer remembered seeing any blood but said that she must have seen it, as it was described in her statement dated 4th February 1972, which was to be taken as more reliable on matters of detail than her statement to this Inquiry. There was an element of doubt in her mind about whether the weapon fired into the vehicle might have been a baton gun, but it was still her belief that it had been a rifle. She said that it was fired from the shoulder. It was suggested to her that the flaps on the side of the APC would have been too high for a short soldier to point a gun downwards through one of the flaps while holding the gun to his shoulder, but she said that this had been possible because the soldier was standing on the pavement, while the vehicle was on the road.

122.156 We return below1 to Alice Long’s account of a soldier firing into the vehicle holding the bodies.

1 Paragraphs 122.166–169

122.157 Alice Long also said that she had no knowledge of bullets, but had thought that the objects that she picked up must have been dum-dum bullets because they were spread open like flowers and some young men had told her to collect any bullets that were spread wide open. She said that she did not think that she had told anyone else about the soldier firing into the APC before the meeting on 7th February 1972 at which Leo Day told her not to mention it. She agreed that this incident was not described in her statement dated 4th February 1972, which she said had been made at a time when everyone was in shock. She said that people were liable to forget things when events happened so quickly.

122.158 Alice Long was asked1 whether the account given in her statement dated 4th February 1972 of an initial approach being made by her and Leo Day to the soldiers in Rossville Street, followed some time later by another visit in which she and Leo Day saw the bodies in the APC, might accurately have stated the sequence of events, but she said that she could not remember. It was then suggested to her2 that she and Leo Day had not made an initial approach to the soldiers in Rossville Street, and that her recollection of him asking her to accompany him because she was wearing a white coat related to an episode in which they had gone from Abbey Park into Glenfada Park North, following the route indicated on the plan accompanying Philip Jacobson’s notes;3 but Alice Long rejected this suggestion. Alice Long agreed that when she reached the APC containing the bodies, Fr Mulvey and Fr Irwin were already there.4 Fr Mulvey told them that he and Fr Irwin had already tried without success to gain access to the vehicle to give the last rites to the casualties. She said that she had picked up one of the two cartridge cases from the ground by where she was standing at the back of the APC and the other from the pavement by the feet of the small soldier. She conceded that it had been irresponsible for her to accuse the soldiers of using dum-dum bullets when she did not know what dum-dum bullets were. She said that she did not speak to Fr Mulvey or Fr Irwin about the soldier firing into the vehicle.

1 Day 135/190-192

2 Day 135/210-217

3 AL37.10

4 Day 135/217-223

Bernard Feeney

122.159 In his interview with Kathleen Keville,1 Bernard Feeney said that a woman who had seen the bodies being dragged to the vehicle wanted him and Fr Irwin to go to see them. Bernard Feeney and Fr Irwin approached an officer, who told them that the soldiers had not shot anyone and that no-one had been put into an Army vehicle. They returned to the woman, who was distressed and wanted them to go back to the officer. When they did so, the officer said that he had still not seen any casualties and that there was no-one in the vehicle, but that Bernard Feeney and Fr Irwin were free to look into it. They went over to the vehicle and the officer opened the doors, revealing a few men who had been shot and were lying on top of one another.

1 AF8.35

122.160 In his NICRA statement,1 Bernard Feeney recorded that he and Fr Irwin saw a woman in the Rossville Flats who was hysterical because she had seen the bodies being thrown into the vehicle. They went to the vehicle and met a Regimental Sergeant Major of the Parachute Regiment. He had stripes, a crown and wings on his uniform and was wearing a red beret. When Fr Irwin asked to see the bodies he was told that there were none in the vehicles. An officer with three pips on his shoulder supported this story. Bernard Feeney and Fr Irwin returned to the woman, who became more hysterical and pointed out from a window the vehicle containing the bodies. Bernard Feeney and Fr Irwin went back to the officer. Fr Irwin called to Fr Mulvey. The two priests and Bernard Feeney went with the officer to the vehicle. The officer opened the door and they saw three bodies lying inside. Fr Irwin and Fr Mulvey entered the vehicle in order to give the last rites. A soldier told Bernard Feeney to go into the vehicle as well but he refused. Photographers gathered and started to take photographs of the bodies. Fr Irwin and Bernard Feeney then went to find the sergeant . When they found him, they asked him why he had not shown them the bodies when they had asked him. He just laughed at them.

1 AF8.10-11

122.161 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Bernard Feeney told us that he and Fr Irwin initially spoke to a soldier who appeared to be a sergeant with three stripes and a crown on his arm. According to this account, the Sergeant was one of a group of soldiers standing around a vehicle at the point marked C on the plan attached to the statement2 (on the east side of Rossville Street north of the rubble barricade). When Bernard Feeney and Fr Irwin asked him whether there were bodies in the vehicle, the Sergeant said: There is no fucking way there are any bodies . When they asked whether he was sure, the Sergeant repeated his comment. Bernard Feeney and Fr Irwin returned to the woman in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats, who confirmed that the bodies were in the vehicle at point C. Bernard Feeney and Fr Irwin went back to the vehicle.

1 AF8.5-AF8.6

2 AF8.9

122.162 Again according to this account, Fr Irwin called Fr Mulvey to assist. The three of them met the officer with three pips on his shoulder. Fr Mulvey demanded that the officer open the doors of the vehicle but at first he refused. There followed an aggressive verbal confrontation between Fr Mulvey and the officer, who eventually ordered that the doors should be opened. Inside the vehicle Bernard Feeney saw three bodies lying on top of one another, looking as if they had been stacked. The highest and lowest bodies were positioned with their heads towards the rear of the vehicle. Bernard Feeney immediately recognised the highest as William Nash and the lowest as John Young.

122.163 He told us that the middle body was lying with the head towards the front of the vehicle and he felt the body of John Young for a pulse but found none. John Young was clearly dead, as was William Nash. Bernard Feeney then knelt on the floor of the vehicle, felt the ankle of the middle body for a pulse, and established that this body too was dead. By this stage the two priests were inside the vehicle administering the last rites. A soldier ordered Bernard Feeney to get into the vehicle but he did not want to do so. There was no partition between the front and the rear of the vehicle. A soldier was sitting sideways on the front passenger seat with his back to the nearside door and his legs stretched out casually into the rear of the vehicle, close to the head of the middle body. As the priests finished giving the last rites and climbed out of the vehicle, a group of photographers began to arrive. As they did so, the soldiers slammed the doors shut. Fr Mulvey went to look for the Sergeant who had told Bernard Feeney and Fr Irwin that there were no bodies in the vehicle, in order to ask him why he had lied. The Sergeant just laughed and said ‘I told you there were no bodies there’ . The officer who had ordered the doors to be opened was smirking and joining in the joke.

122.164 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Bernard Feeney said that neither Alice Long nor Leo Day was present when he and the two priests went to the APC. He did not at any stage see a soldier fire a weapon into the vehicle.

1 Day 141/59-62; Day 141/68-69

122.165 In his interview with Stephen Gargan,1 Bernard Feeney said that when he went to the vehicle for the second time with the priests, the soldiers initially refused to open the doors, but after a heated exchange with Fr Mulvey the officer with three pips ordered the Sergeant with the three stripes and crown to open them. As the Sergeant did so, the officer said ‘We told you we had no fuckin’ bodies’. The officer laughed and the other soldiers laughed with him. The officer was wearing a helmet and spoke with an English accent. Bernard Feeney said that the highest and lowest of the three bodies were positioned with their heads towards the front of the vehicle. The middle body was lying with the head towards the rear. This was the body of John Young. The soldiers were making derogatory remarks. Bernard Feeney wanted to have a go at the soldier who told him to get into the vehicle, but was restrained by Fr Irwin. The soldier inside the vehicle said nothing at any stage.

1 AF8.19-AF8.20; AF8.24-AF8.30

Alice Long’s account of the firing of a rifle into the vehicle containing the bodies: medical and scientific evidence

Dr John Lloyd

122.166 Dr Lloyd, the independent scientific expert engaged by this Inquiry, said in his report1 that there was nothing in the results of the tests conducted by the Department of Industrial and Forensic Science by means of which Alice Long’s account of a rifle being fired into the vehicle containing the bodies might be verified. If a bullet had disintegrated within the vehicle while the bodies were present, or if muzzle residue had been captured by the interior of the vehicle, then some of this material could have contaminated the bodies heavily. However, the bodies of Michael McDaid, Willliam Nash and John Young were not significantly more contaminated than the bodies of other casualties.

1 E1.50

122.167 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Dr Lloyd said that it was very difficult to draw a conclusion either way on this issue, but when invited to agree that the results of the tests for lead particles on the three bodies collected from the rubble barricade were not consistent with Alice Long’s account, Dr Lloyd said that one could put it in those terms .

1 Day 227/74-75

Dr Richard Shepherd and Mr Kevin O’Callaghan

122.168 Dr Shepherd and Mr O’Callaghan, who were engaged by this Inquiry as independent experts on pathology and ballistics respectively, said in their report1 that they could not exclude the possibility that a rifle had been fired into the vehicle containing the bodies as alleged by Alice Long. However, there was evidence of only one gunshot injury to each of the three casualties, and there were no other injuries that would confirm that a rifle had been fired into the vehicle.

1 E2.63

Conclusions

122.169 In our view, Alice Long’s account of a soldier firing into the vehicle containing the bodies is based on a false memory and there was no such incident. There is no other evidence to support it, despite the undoubted presence nearby of priests and civilians, let alone senior soldiers. As we have earlier pointed out,1 Leo Day expressed the view that Alice Long was in a very distressed state; and we have concluded that it is likely that her experiences on Bloody Sunday led her to come to believe things that did not happen. In this connection it is possible that she witnessed or was told about the firing of a baton gun into Lieutenant N’s vehicle at an earlier stage (which we have considered earlier in this report2) and came mistakenly to believe that she had seen a soldier firing a rifle into the vehicle when it was carrying the bodies.

1 Paragraph 122.142 2Paragraphs 43.16–23

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital: the evidence of other civilian witnesses

Letty Donnelly

122.170 In her NICRA statement,1 Letty Donnelly recorded that after the bodies of the three boys had been collected, the Army vehicle moved back along Rossville Street and remained there for about 30 minutes. A priest then approached the vehicle and asked the soldiers to take the casualties to the hospital. The vehicle then moved off.

1 AD125.14

122.171 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Letty Donnelly told us that the priest approached the vehicle about 30 minutes after it had returned up Rossville Street. She saw the priest talking to soldiers in the front cabin of the vehicle. She could not hear what was being said, but her impression from his body language was that the priest was asking about the whereabouts and welfare of the boys who had been picked up from the rubble barricade.

1 AD125.3

122.172 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Letty Donnelly said that it had seemed as though a very long time had passed before the priest approached the vehicle, but she agreed that it might have been very difficult to judge the length of time.

1 Day 124/123-124

Ann Gallagher

122.173 In her interview with Kathleen Keville,1 Ann Gallagher said that she was in her aunt’s flat, which was in Rossville Street, facing Abbey Park. Soldiers had collected three bodies in an Army vehicle and left it in Rossville Street. Fr Irwin went to the vehicle and was told that there was no-one in it. Fr Irwin came back up to Ann Gallagher’s aunt’s flat. Those in the flat told him that the bodies were definitely in the vehicle. When Fr Irwin went down again the soldiers let him in . He came back with a Knights of er – an ambulance and the soldiers would not let them in.

1 AG1.8

122.174 In her written statement to this Inquiry,1 Ann Gallagher told us that her current recollection was that the three men had been injured and not dead. When they were thrown into the vehicle, her aunt had run out of her flat onto the balcony of Garvan Place, where she met a priest. Ann Gallagher could no longer remember the name of the priest. Her aunt told the priest what she had seen. The priest went down to Rossville Street and approached the soldiers by the vehicle. Ann Gallagher watched from inside her aunt’s flat. The door of the vehicle was closed. The priest spoke to the soldiers for a few minutes. Ann Gallagher could tell that he was asking to see the men in the vehicle. The soldiers shook their heads and did not open the door. The priest returned to the balcony and told those in Ann Gallagher’s aunt’s flat that the soldiers had told him that there was no-one in the vehicle. They all screamed that they had seen the men thrown into it. The priest went back to the soldiers with an Order of Malta volunteer. He must have met the Order of Malta volunteer on his way to the vehicle. Both of them spoke to the soldiers, who still would not open the vehicle. Ann Gallagher could not remember what the priest did next. So far as she could recall, the vehicle remained where it was.

1 AG1.3-AG1.4

122.175 In her oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Ann Gallagher said that her aunt was Eileen Gallagher, who lived at 8 Garvan Place in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats.

1 Day 401/4

Eileen Gallagher

122.176 In her NICRA statement,1 Eileen Gallagher recorded that after the bodies had been collected the soldiers kept opening and closing the door of the vehicle in order to look in. She went out from her flat at 8 Garvan Place onto the balcony of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats to see whether she could find someone to give aid to the casualties. She met Fr Irwin and a male Order of Malta volunteer and told them what she had seen. The three of them went downstairs but Fr Irwin would not let Eileen Gallagher go out onto the street, and so she returned to her flat and watched from her window. It seemed that Fr Irwin received no satisfaction from the soldiers, and he came back upstairs.

1 AG10.2-AG10.4

122.177 According to this statement, Eileen Gallagher ran out to meet Fr Irwin. He said that the soldiers had told him that there was no-one in the vehicle, but Eileen Gallagher insisted that it contained three bodies. Fr Irwin came into her flat so that Eileen Gallagher could point out the vehicle to him. He then went back downstairs. At this stage Eileen Gallagher saw Fr Mulvey join Fr Irwin. Then Fr Irwin approached one of the soldiers. Eventually the soldiers opened the door and the two priests entered the vehicle. The Order of Malta volunteer tried to enter the vehicle after the two priests had disembarked, but the soldiers pulled him out again. There were four bodies (sic) in the vehicle. The Order of Malta volunteer told Eileen Gallagher that it appeared that the casualty lying lowest in the vehicle had died of suffocation. The uppermost of the bodies was that of a boy named McDaid.

122.178 Eileen Gallagher is dead and did not give evidence to this Inquiry.

Willie Healey

122.179 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Willie Healey told us that Fr Mulvey walked north up Rossville Street towards an Army vehicle parked on the north side of the rubble barricade with its front facing to the north-west. According to this account Fr Mulvey asked the paratroopers to open the doors of the vehicle but they refused. Fr Mulvey became very angry and forced the doors open himself. Willie Healey did not see inside the vehicle but heard people say that it contained three bodies. Fr Mulvey seemed to be shocked by what he saw in the vehicle. Willie Healey caught a strong smell of CS gas after the doors of the vehicle were opened. Many paratroopers and reporters near the vehicle were laughing. Willie Healey was shocked and dismayed by this and so he hurled abuse at them.

1 AH48.3

122.180 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Willie Healey said that he had followed Fr Mulvey towards the vehicle. He did not think that there had been anyone else with Fr Mulvey.

1 Day 78/117-119; Day 78/147-148

Frank Lawton

122.181 In his NICRA statement,1 Frank Lawton recorded that Fr Edward Daly entered the vehicle containing the three bodies, and spent a few moments inside it.

1 AL6.20

122.182 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Frank Lawton recorded that the priest who entered the vehicle was Fr Mulvey.

1 AL6.22

122.183 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Frank Lawton told us that Fr Mulvey approached the soldiers, waving a white handkerchief, while the bodies were being collected from the rubble barricade. According to this account, Fr Mulvey appeared to argue with the soldiers, seeking to be allowed to administer the last rites. They refused to allow him to do this. When the bodies had been loaded into the vehicle, it was driven further down Rossville Street and parked at about the point marked M on the plan attached to the statement2 (near the north end of Joseph Place). While it was parked there, Fr Mulvey and Fr Daly were allowed into the vehicle. Frank Lawton presumed that they had then given the last rites to the casualties. The vehicle was driven back up Rossville Street to the north.

1 AL6.5

2 AL6.26

122.184 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Frank Lawton said that it was quite possible that the priest who entered the vehicle with Fr Mulvey had been Fr Irwin and not Fr Daly.

1 Day 389/130-131

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital: the evidence of police officers

Constable A Brown

122.185 In his 1972 statement,1 Constable Brown recorded that he took cover behind one of the Army vehicles parked by the Rossville Flats. He saw Fr Mulvey come towards the vehicle. Fr Mulvey was allowed into the back of the vehicle with another younger priest. When he left the vehicle, Fr Mulvey appeared very agitated and shouted at the paratroopers: ‘You bastards, I hope you got the guns they were shooting at you with’.

1 JB13.1-JB13.2

122.186 Constable Brown did not give evidence to the Widgery Inquiry or to this Inquiry.

Sergeant S Penney

122.187 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Sergeant Penney of the RUC recorded that he met a member of the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps on the west side of Rossville Street, who told him that the Army had killed three men and injured five. Sergeant Penney crossed Rossville Street towards a line of Army vehicles. He saw Fr Mulvey running towards the rear of one of the vehicles, waving a white handkerchief and followed by a younger priest. Sergeant Penney was at the rear of the vehicle when Fr Mulvey reached it. A soldier standing by the vehicle opened the doors. The two priests climbed into the vehicle. There were three bodies inside the vehicle. Sergeant Penney saw the priests examining the bodies. After about 30 seconds, the two priests emerged from the vehicle. Fr Mulvey said to the soldier ‘Where is that Officer who told me there was nobody dead. I hope you got the guns that they were shooting you with’. The two priests then departed. At no time did the soldier at the rear of the vehicle speak to the priests.

1 JP7.2

122.188 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Sergeant Penney gave a similar account. He told us that he was wearing civilian clothes; and that the member of the Order of Malta Ambulance Corps must have thought that he was a pressman because he was carrying a camera. Sergeant Penney said that he could not remember whether the three bodies had been lying side by side or on top of one another, but their feet were pointing towards the rear of the vehicle.

1 JP7.5-JP7.6

122.189 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Sergeant Penney said that he did not know the rank of the soldier who had been at the rear of the vehicle. He was shown Constable Brown’s photograph and Sam Gillespie’s photograph (both of which we have reproduced above2) but was unable to say which, if either, of them showed the younger priest who came to the vehicle with Fr Mulvey.

1 Day 219/72-75; Day 219/100-103

2 Paragraphs 122.134 and 122.146

Constable Robert S Simpson

122.190 In his 1972 statement,1 Constable Simpson recorded that he overheard a man telling Sergeant Penney that the paratroopers had killed three men and wounded five. He crossed Rossville Street to a line of Army vehicles. He stood close to the rear of one of these vehicles. A soldier was standing at the rear door. Fr Mulvey and another priest arrived. Fr Mulvey asked the soldier where the bodies were. The soldier opened the rear doors of the vehicle. Constable Simpson saw three bodies lying on the floor of the vehicle. Fr Mulvey exclaimed O God! what a way to treat bodies ”. He appeared very agitated. Both priests climbed into the vehicle. The soldier closed the door. Very shortly afterwards the priests emerged. Fr Mulvey was now very very angry and said to the soldier ‘Where is that Officer who told me there was nobody dead. I hope you got the guns that they were shooting with’. The two priests then left.

1 JS10.1

122.191 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Constable Simpson told us that some soldiers had apparently been picking up bodies and throwing them into the back of an army vehicle . He was about 20 feet away from the vehicle. He could not see very well, but thought that there had been three or four bodies in the vehicle. He did not know from where the bodies had been collected. He thought that there had been four soldiers and an officer at the back of the vehicle. A local parish priest was there. He was extremely angry and agitated about the way in which the Army had handled the bodies. Constable Simpson thought that the soldiers had felt vulnerable and had been trying to get away from the area as quickly as possible. In the original draft of his 1972 statement, Constable Simpson had recorded the exact words used by the priest, which included ‘fucking’ and ‘bastards’ , but he had removed these words at the request of a superior officer, who said that they would not help the situation.

1 JS10.13-JS10.14

122.192 Constable Simpson did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Attempts to see the bodies before they were driven to Altnagelvin Hospital: the evidence of military witnesses

Lieutenant N

122.193 In his fourth RMP statement,1 Lieutenant N recorded that after the bodies had been brought to the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats, two priests appeared and asked to be allowed to see them. One of the priests entered the APC. When the priest emerged, he made no complaint about the way in which the body had been laid in the vehicle.

1 B395

122.194 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Lieutenant N recorded that a priest came up to him in a somewhat agitated state and asked him where the bodies were; and that he pointed to his vehicle. The priest said that he had already asked whether there were any more bodies and had been told that there were not. A member of Lieutenant N’s platoon told Lieutenant N that he thought that he was the soldier who had answered the priest’s original question, and that at the time he had not known where the bodies were. The priest, or another priest who was with him, climbed into the vehicle, shut the door, and stayed there for a little while.

1 B400

122.195 In his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,1 Lieutenant N said that he was unaware that the priest who attended the bodies had had difficulty in administering the last rites because of the way in which the bodies were positioned.

1 WT12.80

122.196 Lieutenant N did not refer to Fr Mulvey and Fr Irwin’s visit to the bodies in his written statement to this Inquiry.

122.197 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Lieutenant N said that he was the paratrooper shown with the two priests in Constable Brown’s photograph.

1 Day 323/92-93; Day 323/113

122.198 Lieutenant N said that he could recall directing a priest to the back of the vehicle but could not remember what the priest looked like.1 He said that he did not recall the identity of the member of his platoon mentioned in his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry, who had told him that he thought that he was the soldier who had answered the priest’s question about the bodies.2 Lieutenant N denied that he had initially told Fr Irwin that there were no bodies in the vehicle, or that he had smirked at the priests when he subsequently admitted that the bodies were there, or that he had told Fr Irwin, or heard anyone else tell Fr Irwin, that he would be shot if he opened the door of the vehicle.3 It was suggested to Lieutenant N that the reference in his fourth RMP statement to the priest having made no complaint when he emerged from the vehicle showed that Lieutenant N must have made that statement in response to a complaint that had by then been made.4 Lieutenant N said that he was probably asked that question but did not recall what the complaint was.

1 Day 323/113

2 Day 322/113

3 Day 323/40; Day 323/93-94; Day 323/124

4 Day 323/94-97

Sergeant O

122.199 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Sergeant O said that he did not witness the episode involving the two priests and did not know who had been guarding the vehicle at that stage. He had no recollection of an Order of Malta Ambulance Corps volunteer being prevented from entering the vehicle to see whether he could give assistance.

1 Day 335/104-109

Private Q

122.200 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private Q told us that he saw the bodies in the vehicle but could not recall how they were lying. Private 112 was with the bodies, either inside or at the back of the vehicle.

1 B657.5-B657.6

122.201 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private Q said that he did not see any civilians or Order of Malta Ambulance Corps volunteers approach the vehicle containing the bodies, and that he neither witnessed nor heard about an incident in which a priest approached the vehicle and was initially told that there were no bodies in it. Private Q confirmed that he could not recall how the bodies were lying when he saw them.2

1 Day 339/60-61

2 Day 339/90-91

Private U

122.202 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private U said that he had no recollection of a confrontation between a priest and soldiers guarding the bodies in the vehicle.

1 Day 369/102; Day 369/166-167

Private 006

122.203 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 006 told us that a priest approached him and other soldiers while they were standing at the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. According to this account, the priest was wandering around asking where the bodies were. The soldiers sent him from vehicle to vehicle but the priest could not find the bodies. Private 006 thought that the bodies might already have been taken away to the hospital at this stage.

1 B1377.007

122.204 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private 006 was asked why the soldiers had sent the priest from vehicle to vehicle. He said that they had sent the priest to one of the vehicles, and told him that the bodies were probably in that vehicle, although Private 006 thought at the time that the bodies might already have been taken to the hospital. Private 006 denied that the soldiers had been giving the priest the run-around. He said that he had no recollection either of a soldier telling a priest that he would be shot if he opened the doors of a vehicle, or of a soldier smirking at a priest.

1 Day 334/68-70

Private 013

122.205 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 013 told us that a priest approached the vehicle containing the bodies when it was near the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. According to this account, Private 013 thought that the priest was being troublesome and was afraid that he was going to pull out a pistol and shoot at us . His instinct was to keep the priest away from the vehicle. However, Private 013 soon realised that he was not being troublesome and that he wanted to give the last rites to the casualties.

1 B1408.005

122.206 Private 013 did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Captain 028

122.207 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Captain 028 told us that he saw an Army vehicle parked somewhere in Rossville Street with its rear doors wide open. According to this account, a priest was standing next to the vehicle, trying to attract the attention of local pressmen in order that they might take photographs of what was inside the vehicle. Captain 028 went over and looked into the vehicle. He saw a horrific scene of bodies piled on top of one another, with their heads and limbs at strange angles and blood all over the bodies and the interior of the vehicle. He could not recall how many bodies there were but thought that there had probably been four or five. Captain 028 knew that if photographs of this scene appeared in the newspapers it would look terrible. He therefore pushed the priest to one side and slammed the doors of the vehicle shut, saying that no-one was allowed to take photographs. Captain 028 thought that he might also have told the driver of the vehicle to move it away, but he was not sure about this. Captain 028 did not know the identity of the priest and did not recognise him in Constable Brown’s photograph that we have shown above.2 Captain 028 felt particularly unsympathetic to the priest and thought that he was helping to grind the axe for the IRA . We observed earlier in this report that in our view it would be unwise to rely on the accounts given by Captain 028.3

1 B1582.4

2 Paragraphs 122.134 and 122.197

3 Paragraphs 85.78–82

122.208 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Captain 028 said that he had no recollection of an incident in which Fr Irwin and Fr Mulvey were eventually given access to the bodies after Fr Irwin had initially been wrongly told that there were no bodies in the vehicle.

1 Day 356/48-51

Warrant Officer Class II Lewis

122.209 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Warrant Officer Class II Lewis told us that at a time before he knew that people had been shot, a bald headed padre approached him from around the corner of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. According to this account, Warrant Officer Class II Lewis naturally barred his way. The priest said something like ‘Do you not know that there are people dead round the corner? Who’s in charge here? ’ Warrant Officer Class II Lewis took him to Major Loden. An intense discussion followed between Major Loden and the priest but Warrant Officer Class II Lewis did not hear what was said. Major Loden then called for ambulances. At about this time Sergeant O reported that he had wounded people in the back of his vehicle. He did not say that they were dead. Major Loden was concerned that these casualties should be taken to hospital. Warrant Officer Class II Lewis had always thought that the priest was Fr Daly, but had now seen television footage that suggested that he might have been another priest.

1 B2111.018

122.210 In his second supplementary written statement to this Inquiry,1 Warrant Officer Class II Lewis told us that he thought that the priest who had approached him had been the white-haired man shown holding a handkerchief in Constable Brown’s photograph, which we have shown above.2

1 B2111.45

2 Paragraphs 122.134 and 122.197

122.211 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Warrant Officer Class II Lewis said that the priest had told him that there were two dead bodies lying round the corner at the entrance to Rossville Flats, at the foot of the stairs of Rossville Flats . He had no recollection of the priest ever asking to see bodies in the back of any of the Army vehicles, or protesting about the lack of medical attention for casualties in any such vehicle.

1 Day 373/71-73

Major Loden

122.212 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Major Loden said that he did not see the bodies when they were in the vehicle. He did not recall having any discussion with a priest about the bodies, and did not believe that he had told Fr Irwin that there were no bodies in the vehicle. He did not see Fr Irwin and Fr Mulvey demanding access to the bodies, nor did he witness exchanges between Fr Irwin and the soldiers near the vehicle.

1 Day 343/54-60; Day 347/23

Private 221’s examination of the bodies

Lieutenant N

122.213 In his fourth RMP statement,1 Lieutenant N recorded that shortly after the bodies were brought back to the north end of Block 1, Private 221 of the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) examined them and pronounced them dead.

1 B394

Private 221

122.214 In his RMP statement,1 Private 221 (a medical assistant of the RAMC attached to 1 PARA) recorded that he was informed by Lieutenant N that there were three bodies in an APC. He went to the vehicle, which was parked in Rossville Street near the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats, and looked inside. He saw three bodies lying on the floor. One was lying on its stomach with the head towards the front of the vehicle. A second was lying on its back with the head towards the rear of the vehicle. The third was lying between the other two in the coma position with the head towards the front of the vehicle. The three bodies were positioned in such a way that had they been alive they would have been able to breathe freely. Private 221 examined the three bodies, formed the opinion that they were dead, and so informed Lieutenant N. At this time sporadic firing was taking place in the area of the Rossville Flats.

1 B2163-B2164

122.215 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 221 told us that he was asked to examine the bodies by a non-commissioned officer whose name he could not remember. His current recollection was that each of the three bodies was lying on its side, but three quarters on his front with the chin up, and he did not now recall hearing firing while he was examining the bodies. However, he believed that the account that he gave in his RMP statement when events were fresher in his mind must have been correct. After his examination of the bodies, he reported back to the non-commissioned officer.

1 B2165.004-B2165.007

122.216 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private 221 said that he did not now remember that Lieutenant N had asked him to look at the bodies. When he saw the bodies they were not in the positions as described by Fr Irwin. Private 221 said that he had no recollection of seeing any priests or paramedics in the area, or of anyone else trying to gain access to the vehicle to examine the bodies.

1 Day 361/128-139

Movement of the bodies to Altnagelvin Hospital and their handling at the hospital: the evidence of military witnesses

Lieutenant N

122.217 In his second RMP statement,1 Lieutenant N recorded that about 15 minutes after the vehicle containing the bodies had reached the north end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats, he handed it over to Sergeant O and five members of Sergeant O’s section. Sergeant O was instructed to deliver the bodies to Altnagelvin Hospital.

1 B385

122.218 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Lieutenant N recorded that he had given this order on the instructions of Major Loden.

1 B401

122.219 Lieutenant N did not refer to the movement of the bodies to Altnagelvin Hospital in his written or oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Sergeant O

122.220 In his first RMP statement1 and in his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,2 Sergeant O recorded that at about 1645 hours Lieutenant N instructed him to take Lieutenant N’s vehicle, containing the three bodies collected from the rubble barricade, to Altnagelvin Hospital. He took the bodies to the hospital where they were handed to the mortuary attendant.

1 B442

2 B469

122.221 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Sergeant O told us that he thought that six soldiers had been in the vehicle when the bodies were taken to the hospital. According to this account, Sergeant O sat in the front beside Private INQ 768 who drove the vehicle. They did not know the way to the hospital and had to ask for directions from soldiers of the Royal Anglian Regiment at the Regimental Aid Post at Craigavon Bridge. When they arrived at the hospital, Sergeant O went in and found a doctor. He asked the doctor to come out to the vehicle to confirm that the bodies were dead. There was mayhem in the hospital. The doctor wanted the soldiers to wait for an hour or so but Sergeant O told him that he had to come out and look at the bodies. The doctor then did so and confirmed that they were all dead. Sergeant O was told to take the bodies to the mortuary. When he reached the mortuary he was told that it was full, and was asked to keep the bodies in the vehicle for a while. He agreed to do this and parked the vehicle on a road next to the hospital. RUC officers at the mortuary told Sergeant O that they were worried that the IRA might mount a rescue operation to recover the bodies of some of the casualties. They asked him to provide three or four soldiers to act as sentries until police reinforcements arrived. Sergeant O agreed to this. Eventually, Sergeant O and his men reversed the vehicle to the door of the mortuary. The three bodies were carried out and laid on the floor of the mortuary. Blankets were put over them. The soldiers went back to the vehicle and received orders to return to their base at Drumahoe.

1 B575.119-B575.120

122.222 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Sergeant O said that he did not recall the time at which he left the Bogside in the vehicle carrying the bodies, or the time at which he arrived either at the casualty department at Altnagelvin Hospital or at the mortuary. Apart from Private INQ 768 and himself, Sergeant O could not remember which soldiers had been in the vehicle when the bodies were taken to the hospital. Sergeant O said that no stretchers were available at the mortuary, and so the soldiers took hold of the bodies by the wrists, but he denied that the bodies had been handled like stuck pigs .2 He also denied that he and his men had been laughing and joking as the bodies were carried into the mortuary. He said that the bodies were carried carefully into the mortuary and that there was no disrespectful behaviour.3

1 Day 335/109-112; Day 336/140-141

2 Day 336/81-83

3 Day 336/119-121

Corporal P

122.223 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry1 and in his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,2 Corporal P said that he accompanied the bodies to Altnagelvin Hospital in Lieutenant N’s vehicle, having been ordered to act as escort.

1 B593

2 WT13.52

122.224 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Corporal P told us that he travelled in the front of the vehicle but was not the driver. He did not recall how many other soldiers had been with him or who they were. He was not involved in taking the bodies out of the vehicle. He thought that this might have been done by hospital staff. The soldiers were not at the hospital for long. When they left, it was getting darker .

1 B623.002-B623.003

122.225 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Corporal P said that he did not recall going to the hospital mortuary.

1 Day 353/124

Private Q

122.226 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry1 and in his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,2 Private Q said that he saw the three bodies in the APC but that he left in a different vehicle.

1 B637

2 WT12.90

Private U

122.227 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private U told us that he did not go to Altnagelvin Hospital with the bodies.

1 Day 369/182

Private 006

122.228 In his RMP statement,1 Private 006 recorded that he did not go to Altnagelvin Hospital with the bodies.

1 B1376

Private 013

122.229 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 013 told us that he was one of the soldiers who had taken the bodies in the vehicle away from the Rossville Flats. He thought that they had gone to a mortuary but he could not say where it had been. Private 013 and another soldier whose identity he could not recall carried the body of William Nash out of the vehicle and laid it down in a makeshift building . Private 013 held the body by one of the legs and one of the arms.

1 B1408.005

122.230 Private 013 did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Private 017

122.231 In his supplementary written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 017 told us that he was one of a number of soldiers interviewed by the author Max Arthur, but he denied that he was the private of 1 PARA who had been quoted in Max Arthur’s book Northern Ireland: Soldiers Talking (London: Sidgwick and Jackson, 1987)2 as having said that he was one of those who had taken the bodies to the hospital, carried them in and laid them in a hallway.

1 B1484.023-B1484.024

2 B1484.027

122.232 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private 017 said that he took no part in the movement of the bodies to the hospital.

1 Day 358/85

Private 112

122.233 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private 112 told us that he accompanied the bodies to the local hospital. According to this account, when they arrived, two of the soldiers took one of the bodies into the hospital but had to bring it back to the vehicle because the mortuary was full. Private 112 thought that these two soldiers had been Corporal P and Private INQ 768 but he was not sure about this. Private 112 thought that the bodies were eventually allowed to be taken into the mortuary but he could no longer remember which soldiers took them there.

1 B1732.007

122.234 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private 112 said that he did not know when the vehicle containing the bodies had left for the hospital. His recollection was that after the bodies had been picked up there had been a small wait somewhere before they were taken to the hospital. It was suggested to him that the bodies did not arrive at the hospital until about 1730 hours. He could not remember what had happened in the preceding 45 minutes, but he said that the driver did not know the location of the hospital, and that this might account for the delay. He said that he did not see how the bodies were moved into the hospital once they had arrived there.2

1 Day 320/148-149; Day 320/155-156

2 Day 320/120

Corporal 162

122.235 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Corporal 162 told us that he did not accompany the bodies to the hospital.

1 B1962.004

Private 221

122.236 In his RMP statement,1 Private 221 recorded that he saw the vehicle containing the bodies being driven away from Rossville Street about two or three minutes after he had examined the bodies.

1 B2164

122.237 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private 221 said that what he said about this matter in his RMP statement must have been correct. He said that he did not know what time it had been when he was asked to examine the bodies, nor was he told for how long the bodies had been in the vehicle when he saw them.2

1 Day 361/133-134

2 Day 361/137-138

Major Loden

122.238 In his statement made on 17th February 1972,1 Major Loden recorded that before 1815 hours, when he received an order to withdraw Support Company to William Street, members of Mortar Platoon had removed three bodies from the scene in the back of one of their vehicles.

1 B2222

Private INQ 768

122.239 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private INQ 768 told us that he received an order to drive an APC containing bodies to a mortuary. According to this account, he could not remember who had given him this order, nor could he remember where the mortuary had been. It might have been attached to a hospital. He could not remember who had been in the vehicle with him, but there was at least one other soldier. Private INQ 768 recalled that there was a reception area, which he thought belonged to the mortuary. There were lots of people in the reception area. He assumed that they were there to identify casualties. The soldiers had to wait for these people to go before they unloaded the bodies.

1 C768.3-C768.4

122.240 According to this account, when a suitable opportunity arose, Private INQ 768 went to the back of the vehicle and opened the doors. There was a body in the vehicle with its head towards the doors. Private INQ 768 grasped the body under the arms in order to slide it out. As he did so, a soldier told him that someone was coming, and so he pushed the body back into the vehicle in order not to upset anyone, and shut the doors. When he did this, he heard the head hit the inside of the doors. He later saw blood at the base of the doors of the vehicle. He thought that this was the result of the head hitting the doors. The soldiers waited and when no-one was around they took the bodies out. Private INQ 768 could not recall whether he had carried any of the bodies. Some people in the immediate vicinity were swearing and shouting at the soldiers. Private INQ 768 could not recall for how long the soldiers were at the mortuary.

122.241 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private INQ 768 said that his most vivid recollection of the day was of driving the bodies to the mortuary. He had no idea of the reason for any delay that there may have been in bringing the bodies to the hospital. He said that he was not laughing or joking when the bodies were removed at the mortuary, and that he did not remember other soldiers doing so, nor did he recall soldiers acting in a jubilant manner.

1 Day 323/129; Day 323/165-169

Private INQ 1918

122.242 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Private INQ 1918 told us that he and another soldier went to Altnagelvin Hospital in the back of the vehicle carrying the bodies. According to this account, he thought that the other soldier had been Private 112. He could not remember who had ordered them to go with the bodies or who was driving the vehicle. He thought that there had been two or three bodies. They were piled up on the floor of the vehicle. There was a lot of blood. He could not give any further details of the position of the bodies except to say that they did not come above the height of his shoulders as he sat on the bench seat in the back of the vehicle. He pushed the bodies aside with his foot when he entered the vehicle and thought that Private 112 would have had to do the same, although he did not see him do so. He told us that he, Private INQ 1918, did not otherwise touch the bodies. When they arrived at the hospital, he and Private 112 opened the rear doors of the vehicle. A nurse was present. Private 112 and Private INQ 1918 disembarked and walked to the front of the vehicle. Private INQ 1918 did not see what then happened to the bodies but assumed that hospital staff had taken them out of the vehicle. He did not handle the bodies and he did not think that Private 112 had handled them.

1 C1918.3

122.243 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Private INQ 1918 said that in the three years since he had made his written statement he had forgotten most of what he had then remembered about the movement of the bodies and could now recall only fractional parts of it . He could not remember when the bodies were taken to the hospital, or how long it took to reach the hospital, or how long he was at the hospital. He did not recall seeing or speaking to a priest at any stage.

1 Day 342/121-125

Handling of the bodies at Altnagelvin Hospital: the evidence of other witnesses

Fr John Irwin

122.244 In his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry,1 Fr Irwin said that he was at the mortuary at Altnagelvin Hospital when the bodies were delivered. The time was exactly 6.15pm. He saw the paratroopers take the bodies out of the Army vehicle.

1 WT5.37

122.245 In his depositions for the coroner’s inquests into the deaths of Michael McDaid,1 William Nash2 and John Young,3 Fr Irwin confirmed that the bodies were delivered to the mortuary at 6.15pm.

1 H9.8

2 H9.9

3 H9.7

122.246 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Fr Irwin told us that he was at the mortuary when the vehicle arrived. Two soldiers carried each body out of the vehicle, one holding the head and shoulders and the other the feet. Fr Irwin could not say whether the same two soldiers carried each body. The bodies were not carried disrespectfully.

1 H9.14-H9.16

122.247 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Fr Irwin said that he had noted the time at which the bodies arrived at the mortuary because it seemed to have taken a long time for them to be brought there from Rossville Street. He confirmed that the soldiers carried the bodies carefully into the mortuary.2

1 Day 153/26-27

2 Day 153/37-38

Dr Thomas McCabe

122.248 In his written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Dr McCabe recorded that when he arrived at Altnagelvin Hospital he was told by one of his patients that Gerard McKinney was lying dead somewhere in the hospital. Dr McCabe went with Fr Irwin to the mortuary, where he saw eight bodies. An Army vehicle, which had previously been parked outside the casualty department, was reversed up to the door of the mortuary. Fr Irwin asked Dr McCabe to stand beside him to see the vehicle opened. Three men were lying inside the vehicle, more or less on top of one another. Blood was spilling over the rear edge of the vehicle. It was very dark inside the vehicle. Three paratroopers nonchalantly removed the bodies. Dr McCabe asked each paratrooper in turn whether a doctor had seen the casualty, and if so when, and whether a doctor had certified the casualty dead. The paratroopers replied ‘Don’t know mate. I couldn’t tell you mate. I can’t tell you anything mate.’ Their attitude was so unhelpful that Dr McCabe considered that there was no point in asking to see an officer. Dr Ian Gordon arrived at the mortuary and said that he had entered the vehicle while it was outside the casualty department, but that the light had been so bad that he had come back in order to identify the deceased.

1 AM51.3-AM51.5

122.249 Dr McCabe pointed out to Dr Gordon that Fr Irwin had said that the position of the bodies had not materially changed since Fr Irwin saw them in Rossville Street, but Dr Gordon said that he had satisfied himself that they were dead when the vehicle was outside the casualty department. Mr Harvey, chairman of the consultant medical staff, arrived and compared notes with Fr Irwin and the police to make a list of the dead. Dr McCabe told Mr Harvey that he was sure that Gerard McKinney was not among the eleven bodies in the mortuary. Mr Harvey then recalled that a casualty had been taken to Ward 1 as a case of cardiac arrest.1 Mr Harvey and Dr McCabe went to Ward 1 where Dr McCabe identified Gerard McKinney, who was dead. Mr Harvey and Dr McCabe agreed the death count as 12. Mr Harvey assured Dr McCabe that no more of the injured would die. Fr Irwin and Dr McCabe left at about 7.20pm. The mortuary and casualty department were by that stage surrounded by more armed paratroopers and policemen.

1 This was Gerard McKinney, shot in Abbey Park.

122.250 In a supplementary written statement for the Widgery Inquiry,1 Dr McCabe recorded that he heard no instructions given by hospital staff, police officers or paratroopers about how the bodies should be handled. One paratrooper had stood astride the bodies inside the vehicle. Each body had been passed between his legs to the other soldiers, and then onto a trolley.

1 AM51.9

122.251 According to Tony Stark’s interview notes,1 Dr McCabe told him that he saw seven bodies in the mortuary and then saw soldiers unloading six more bodies from a vehicle. The soldiers were holding the bodies by the feet and arms. Dr McCabe could not remember whether the soldiers had held the bodies by their hands.

1 AM51.10

122.252 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Dr McCabe told us that the bodies were taken from the vehicle onto separate trolleys or tables . He had been appalled by what he had seen in the vehicle, and his conversation with Dr Gordon had reflected his anxiety to ensure that everything was done according to the book, but evidently it had been.

1 AM51.12-AM51.13

122.253 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Dr McCabe said that he never discovered why the bodies had been left in the vehicle outside the casualty department instead of being taken directly to the mortuary.

1 Day 182/49-51

Dr Ian Gordon

122.254 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Dr Gordon told us that although he certified a number of bodies dead at the mortuary, he did not recall seeing any Army vehicles, nor did he recall seeing any of the fatalities at the casualty department. He did not see any of the bodies being taken into the mortuary.

1 AG69.1-AG69.2

122.255 Dr Gordon did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

Detective Constable Colin Ferguson

122.256 In his report dated 3rd February 1972,1 Detective Constable Ferguson recorded that an Army vehicle brought three bodies to the mortuary at Altnagelvin Hospital at 1815 hours. He gave no further details.

1 JF3.1

122.257 Detective Constable Ferguson did not give evidence to this Inquiry.

Constable Hugh McCormac

122.258 In an undated statement relating to Michael McDaid,1 Constable McCormac recorded that he was at Altnagelvin Hospital at about 5.30pm. He saw an APC outside the casualty department with three dead bodies in it. He later saw paratroopers and mortuary attendants take the bodies into the mortuary, where they were subsequently identified as the bodies of Michael McDaid, William Nash and John Young.

1 ED40.6

122.259 In an undated statement relating to William Nash,1 Constable McCormac gave a similar account.

1 ED42.7

122.260 In an undated statement relating to John Young,1 Constable McCormac recorded that he saw the vehicle arrive at the casualty department at about 5.30pm. It was when the vehicle was at the mortuary that he saw that it contained three dead bodies.

1 ED41.7

122.261 Constable McCormac did not refer to the handling of the bodies at Altnagelvin Hospital in his oral evidence to the Widgery Inquiry. He died before this Inquiry was established.

Ivan Cooper

122.262 According to John Barry’s interview notes,1 Ivan Cooper told him that he had driven to Altnagelvin Hospital with John Hume. There were paratroopers virtually all round the hospital. Ivan Cooper and John Hume ran in and met Mr Harvey. Ivan Cooper spent some time at the hospital trying to find out the names of the deceased and informing priests and relatives. At some stage Mr Harvey came up to him and said ‘There’s three more outside in an Army vehicle’ . Ivan Cooper and John Hume left the hospital between 7.45pm and 8.00pm, having been informed by the hospital administrator, Lance Thompson, of the names of 12 deceased casualties. At 9.50pm Lance Thompson telephoned Ivan Cooper to say that a 13th body had been brought in. This was the body of Michael McDaid. Ivan Cooper, according to John Barry’s notes, said that Dr McCabe would vouch for the fact that there had previously been only 12 bodies in the mortuary.

1 KC12.71-KC12.72

122.263 Ivan Cooper told us in his written statement to this Inquiry1 that John Barry’s interview notes were not a record of what he had said and were largely incorrect. He rejected the notes in their entirety and declined to comment on them in detail. In his second supplementary written statement to this Inquiry,2 Ivan Cooper again dismissed the notes outright. In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,3 Ivan Cooper said that he did not give an interview to John Barry and that the notes were a total fabrication. Elsewhere in this report4 we have concluded that John Barry did interview Ivan Cooper and made an accurate record of what he said. We have also concluded that it would be unwise to rely upon any of the accounts given by Ivan Cooper, save in so far as they were supported by other evidence.

1 KC12.30

2 KC12.99

3 Day 419/77-78; Day 420/77; Day 419/142-143

4 Paragraphs 147.81–88

122.264 In his interview with Tony Stark,1 Ivan Cooper said that after he had been at the hospital for about 15 minutes, or perhaps a shorter time, someone came up and told him that an Army vehicle carrying dead bodies had arrived at the back of the hospital. Ivan Cooper went to the back of the hospital and saw two or perhaps three vehicles. The doors of one of the vehicles were open. He saw the bodies of young men lying inside. The soldiers proceeded to manhandle the bodies and carry them by the arms or hands and by the legs into the hospital, where they were put on stretchers. The soldiers had obviously been involved in what had occurred because they were talking about how many people had been shot, and by whom. They were exchanging scores with each other . Ivan Cooper presumed that the bodies were examined inside the hospital to check that they were dead. The bodies were then carried back out, placed into the vehicles and taken to the mortuary. Ivan Cooper protested about the way in which the bodies were being manhandled.

1 KC12.57-KC12.63

122.265 Ivan Cooper told us in his written statement to this Inquiry1 that this part of the transcript of his interview with Tony Stark was accurate.

1 KC12.29

122.266 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 Ivan Cooper told us that after his arrival at the hospital he saw soldiers arriving and pushing past people, using their rifles. His account was that he assumed that the soldiers were bringing in some of the injured. Abuse was shouted at the soldiers but they seemed oblivious of it. There were perhaps five or six paratroopers there, wearing red berets, including a young, tall, blond, blue-eyed soldier and a gum-chewing sergeant with hard features. At some stage a man approached Ivan Cooper to say that an Army vehicle was outside the hospital carrying dead bodies. He motioned Ivan Cooper towards the back of the hospital. Ivan Cooper thought that this was where the entrance to the casualty department had been located.

1 KC12.25-KC12.28

122.267 Ivan Cooper told us that he went to the back of the hospital and found paratroopers unloading dead bodies from a vehicle. He was fairly sure that three bodies had been unloaded, but there might have been only two. They seemed to be the bodies of young men. There was blood everywhere. Five or six soldiers were moving the bodies. These were not the same soldiers as had been inside the hospital. Each body was lifted by two soldiers, one holding the hands or wrists and another holding the ankles, with the body sagging in between. No stretcher was used. The bodies were all handled as if they were stuck pigs. Ivan Cooper watched without saying a word. The soldiers were carrying rifles but those lifting the bodies handed their rifles to others while they did so. Ivan Cooper thought that one of them had been wearing a beret and the others helmets. As they moved the bodies, the soldiers were joking and laughing and talking about the events of the day. They were jubilant and gave the impression they thought they had busted an IRA unit in the Bogside . Some of the soldiers were talking about how they had shot people and were saying that people had been carrying nail bombs.

122.268 Ivan Cooper also told us that the bodies were taken into the hospital and then quickly brought back out again and thrown into the vehicle. The whole operation was conducted in a very matter of fact way . The soldiers then drove the vehicle away, presumably to the mortuary. Lance Thompson was being placed under immense pressure to produce information about the casualties. He gave Ivan Cooper lists of two or three names at a time. Ivan Cooper remained at the hospital until it was confirmed to him that the names of all the dead had been provided. At about 8.00pm he received a message asking him to return to John Hume’s house in order to speak to the Taoiseach on the telephone. After he had returned and spoken to the Taoiseach, he received a call from Lance Thompson to say that another body had been identified.

122.269 In his interview with Jimmy McGovern,1 Ivan Cooper said that he saw soldiers manhandling the bodies out of the vehicle at the side of the hospital. They carried the bodies by the arms and legs. They showed no respect and were bantering as they moved the bodies. Ivan Cooper again said that Lance Thompson telephoned him after his return to the Bogside to inform him that there was a 13th body, but in this account Ivan Cooper said that the 13th body was that of Jackie Duddy.

1 KC12.132-KC12.134

122.270 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 Ivan Cooper said that contrary to what was recorded in John Barry’s notes he did not meet Mr Harvey at the hospital.

1 Day 419/135-137; Day 420/92-93

John Hume

122.271 In his interview with John Barry,1 John Hume said that he drove to Altnagelvin Hospital with Ivan Cooper. The soldiers had moved right up to the hospital. John Hume went straight to Dr Harvey, who was in charge of casualty , who gave him a list of names of people who had been killed. There were 12 names on the list, including Gillespie but omitting one of the McKinneys. Mr Harvey told John Hume that the name of one man was missing from the list because he had not yet been identified. John Hume returned home. Shortly after his return, he received a telephone call from Mr Harvey to say that the 13th body had been identified as the body of Michael McDaid.

1 KH8.1

122.272 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 John Hume told us that he was given lists of the dead at the hospital. Michael McDaid’s name was not listed but later that evening John Hume received a call from the hospital authorities to say that they had made a mistake and that Michael McDaid’s name had to be added to the list.

1 KH8.3

122.273 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 John Hume gave a similar account.

1 Day 180/15-16

122.274 John Hume did not in any of his evidence say that he had seen bodies being handled by soldiers at the hospital.

George Downey

122.275 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 George Downey told us that at about 6.30pm he and his wife were sitting in Willie Carlin’s taxi at Altnagelvin Hospital, waiting for the body of his brother-in-law Michael Kelly to be formally identified. According to this account, an Army vehicle pulled up by the doors of the casualty department. Soldiers leapt from the front and rear doors of the vehicle. Two of them proceeded to pull three bodies out of the back of the vehicle. The bodies were thrown onto the ground and then onto trolleys, and were wheeled into the casualty department. George Downey did not see what subsequently happened to them.

1 AD134.24

122.276 George Downey did not give any further details of the handling of the bodies in his oral evidence to this Inquiry.

John Kelly

122.277 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 John Kelly told us that at about 5.50pm he was sitting in Willie Carlin’s car at the side of the emergency entrance to Altnagelvin Hospital, possibly waiting for his father to come out of the hospital, when an Army vehicle arrived. According to this account, some paratroopers dragged three bodies into the hospital, presumably to have them pronounced dead. After a few minutes, the paratroopers brought the bodies back out and took them to the mortuary. The paratroopers were laughing and joking.

1 AK13.3

122.278 In his oral evidence to this Inquiry,1 John Kelly said that the soldiers dragged the bodies along the ground into the casualty department as if they were dead animals. They showed the bodies no respect whatever. It was an extremely distressing scene to witness. As far as he could recall, the soldiers held the bodies by the arms and legs. The soldiers brought the bodies out of the casualty department in much the same manner and threw them back into the vehicle. John Kelly said that 5.50pm was his estimate of the time at which the soldiers arrived, but he could not be sure that it was exactly correct.

1 Day 167/87-90

William McDermott

122.279 In his written statement to this Inquiry,1 William McDermott told us that after accompanying Patrick O’Donnell to Altnagelvin Hospital he met Bill Carlin2 in the car park. According to this account, Fr Irwin asked William McDermott and Bill Carlin to go to the mortuary to identify bodies. As they approached the mortuary, William McDermott saw that an Army vehicle had been reversed up to the door. A policeman asked what they were doing and they explained. The policeman seemed to be disgusted by what had happened. The time was about 6.00pm. William McDermott saw the bodies of two men being pulled out of the APC on stretchers. The first to be pulled out was the body of a young man with fair hair. Bill Carlin told William McDermott that the second body was that of William Nash. William McDermott saw a tall paratrooper, wearing a red beret, resting his foot on the footplate of the vehicle. The paratrooper had an arrogant expression. William McDermott then saw blood dripping from the back of the vehicle onto the ground. A third body, which was lying face down, was pulled out of the vehicle by the heels, as if it was a sack of coal. This body was caught by the shoulders, laid on a stretcher and taken into the mortuary. None of the bodies was handled with any degree of respect.

1 AM189.6-AM189.7 2 Although we are not certain, it seems likely that Willie Carlin and Bill Carlin were the same person.

122.280 According to this account, William McDermott then went into the mortuary. He saw doctors cleaning up the body of William Nash. The third body to be removed from the vehicle was lying face down on the floor of the mortuary. William McDermott turned this body onto its back. The tongue was protruding from the mouth and was swollen and blue. The man appeared to have been shot in the eye. His pockets were searched and contained a payslip showing that his name was Young. Fr Irwin and Fr O’Gara were present at this stage.

122.281 William McDermott did not give oral evidence to this Inquiry, having died since making his written statement.

Consideration of the foregoing evidence

The collection of the bodies

122.282 There is no doubt that Lieutenant N’s APC was used to collect the bodies of Michael McDaid, William Nash and John Young from the rubble barricade. We also have no doubt, from the medical and scientific evidence relating to their injuries, that these three casualties had died soon after being shot and before they were collected from the rubble barricade a few minutes later. The witnesses who suggested the contrary were in our view mistaken.

122.283 We do not know the exact time at which the APC went forward and the bodies were collected. However, this happened after all the casualties in all the sectors had been sustained and, as can be seen from Gilles Peress’s photograph (shown earlier in this chapter1), at a stage when he and Fulvio Grimaldi had come forward from the eastern end of the southern side of Block 2 of the Rossville Flats to take photographs of the scene to the south of the southern end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. It also happened before the arrival of civilian ambulances in Rossville Street. Later in this part of the report2 we consider in detail the timing of that arrival. For reasons that we give there3 we are sure that the first ambulance arrived at or about 4.28pm. In these circumstances we have concluded that the APC went to collect the bodies at some stage before then and after about 4.20pm.

1 Paragraph 122.7

2 Paragraphs 124.2–20

3 Paragraph 124.21

122.284 The order for the APC to go forward to collect the bodies appears to have been given by Major Loden. What seems to have happened is that there was a call for a military ambulance; but that it did not arrive, as Fr Mulvey told the Widgery Inquiry and as the evidence of those who manned the military ambulance indicates, until after the bodies had been collected from the rubble barricade and Fr Mulvey had seen them in the APC. It appears that this delay occurred because the crew of the military ambulance lost their way.1,2 Thus it seems that Major Loden ordered Lieutenant N to pick up the bodies because of a delay in the arrival of the military ambulance.

1 WT4.34; C290.1-2; C2121.2; Day369/211-215; Day369/250-253; B2160; B2162.003-004

2 There may also have been a delay because the Medical Officer was attending to Private INQ 455, the soldier who fell and injured himself in the derelict building in William Street (Abbey Taxis), in circumstances that we have considered in the context of the events of Sector 1.

122.285 The evidence discussed above shows that Lieutenant N travelled in the APC. We accept his evidence that Gilles Peress’s photograph probably shows the vehicle at the time when the bodies were being put into it. It also seems to us that the vehicle drove through the rubble barricade, reversed closer to it on its southern side and, when the bodies had been collected, drove further south along Rossville Street before reversing into the entrance to Glenfada Park North and then driving north through the rubble barricade back to a position on Rossville Street to the north of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats. Some evidence is to the effect that the vehicle moved in a different way, but we are not persuaded that this was the case.

122.286 We are sure that Sergeant O accompanied the vehicle and witnessed the collection of the bodies. He was probably correct in recalling that the bodies had been moved on the rubble barricade after they had been shot. As Frank Lawton told us, it appears that Alexander Nash did this.

122.287 Although it is not entirely clear, it seems to us that Private S was at this stage probably the driver of the APC.

122.288 We are sure that Private 006 was one of the soldiers who put the bodies into the APC and we accept his evidence that no attempt was made at this stage to search them. We are equally sure that Private 013 was another soldier engaged in this task. Private 017 may also have taken part, in view of what appears (despite his denial to us) to have been an admission to Max Arthur that he did so, though we cannot be sure of this since (as will have been observed) there is some evidence that only two soldiers put the bodies into the vehicle.

122.289 From his evidence to us it appears that Private 112 was in the vehicle and pulled the bodies in as they were carried to the back of the APC.

122.290 We are of the view that the soldiers did not come under fire as they collected the bodies and put them in the vehicle. However, we consider that they probably felt exposed and at risk of paramilitary fire. They lifted the bodies and put them into the vehicle in some haste and with what in our view could not on any account be described as paying the bodies any respect at all. We accept that what civilian onlookers witnessed appeared to them to be soldiers treating the bodies with contempt, as if they were pieces of meat ”, sacks of potatoes , pigs , dogs or “sack[s] of coal and that, as Albert Faulkner told us, it seemed that the soldiers wanted to get the bodies and themselves away from the area as soon as possible.

122.291 The weight of the evidence persuades us that the bodies were probably lifted by the shoulders and legs and by that means in effect slung into the vehicle. We are not persuaded that any of the casualties was dragged by the hair, though this is possible. It is also possible that they may have been dragged along the ground by other means before being lifted up.

122.292 Although they may have believed it to be the case, the soldiers handling the bodies could not have known that they were dead. Nor could Major Loden, who ordered the collection of the bodies. No-one saw a soldier examine any of the bodies at this stage to see whether or not they were alive, nor did any soldier suggest that he had done so.

122.293 In our view the soldiers’ behaviour when collecting the bodies was unjustifiable. They might well have felt themselves at risk, but in our view this does not excuse them, or Lieutenant N who was in charge, making no attempt either to check whether the bodies were dead or alive, or (even if they believed that they were dealing with corpses) to treat them with a modicum of respect or decorum. It seems that it did not occur to any of them to do these things. In our view the description given by the civilian witnesses of the way the bodies were put into the vehicle is a generally accurate description of what happened.

The attempts to see and tend to the bodies

122.294 The evidence we have considered above persuades us that Fr Irwin made two attempts to see the bodies in the vehicle after it had returned to the north of the rubble barricade.

122.295 There is differing evidence about the position of the bodies in the APC, in that it is not entirely clear in which direction they were lying. We have no doubt that they were piled in very close together with one body on top of the other two. According to Fr Irwin, the body of William Nash was on top, while John Young’s body was lying face down beneath the others. Fr Irwin had to move two of the bodies in order to enable Fr Mulvey to anoint the one underneath. Bernard Feeney gave a different account, but this might have been based on what he saw after Fr Irwin had moved the bodies.

122.296 According to Fr Irwin, soldiers initially denied that there were any bodies in an APC and refused to let him look, before Fr Mulvey arrived and they were eventually allowed to do so.

122.297 It was suggested by some of the soldiers that initially the soldiers concerned were not aware that there were bodies in the APC and reacted accordingly. This is possible, though in the light of the accounts given by Fr Irwin and Fr Mulvey in 1972, which we consider were a substantially accurate account of events, we are far from convinced of it, at least with regard to some of the soldiers concerned. It seems to us that some soldiers were reluctant for some reason to allow Fr Irwin to look into the APC, despite knowing that there were bodies in it. It is possible that Captain 028 was one of those soldiers.

122.298 In our view it was probably Lieutenant N who finally let Fr Irwin and Fr Mulvey look into the vehicle. Whether he was the soldier or one of the soldiers who had previously refused to do so, we do not know.

122.299 In our view the initial refusal to let Fr Irwin see the bodies was inexcusable. Even if, as may have been the case, some soldiers suspected his motives, this in our view could not have justified a refusal. The vehicle was in an area where there were numerous soldiers. Thus, for example, if it was suspected that Fr Irwin was attempting to recover weapons that might have been on the bodies, the soldiers cannot seriously have thought that he could have succeeded in doing so undetected.

122.300 Although it is difficult to place reliance on the accounts given by Captain 028, we are of the view that it is likely that photographers were prevented from taking photographs of the bodies in the APC.

The movement of the bodies to Altnagelvin Hospital and their handling there

122.301 The evidence we have considered above shows in our view that Private INQ 768 drove the APC with the bodies to Altnagelvin Hospital, accompanied by Sergeant O, Corporal P, Private 013, Private 112, Private INQ 1918 and possibly Private 017.

122.302 It is not entirely clear when the APC left to go to Altnagelvin Hospital. According to Private 221, the APC was driven away two or three minutes after he had examined the bodies and formed the opinion that they were dead. He recorded in his RMP statement1 that at about this time there was sporadic fire taking place in the area of the Rossville Flats. As we discuss later in this part of the report,2 soldiers fired a number of shots at a flat in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats at about 4.40pm. This may have been the firing that Private 221 heard, but since this firing was more or less continuous rather than sporadic and close to where Private 221 was, it seems to us more likely that he was hearing the further firing that took place after the arrival of the second ambulance, ie after about 4.50pm. This latter firing, which we discuss later in this report,3 could in our view properly have been described as sporadic. On this basis it seems to us that the APC left for the hospital at some stage after 4.50pm.

1 B2163-2164

2 Chapter 123

3 Chapter 124

122.303 According to Sergeant O, those in the APC had to ask for directions to the hospital from soldiers at Craigavon Bridge.

122.304 We set out below a map showing Rossville Street, Craigavon Bridge and Altnagelvin Hospital.

122.305 On the basis of the evidence considered above, we consider that the APC carrying the bodies arrived at the casualty department of Altnagelvin Hospital at about 5.30pm. Since we do not know exactly when the APC left the area of Rossville Street, we do not know how long the journey took. There is nothing to suggest that anything untoward occurred on that journey.

122.306 What seems to have happened then is that soldiers carried the bodies into the casualty department but then returned them to the vehicle, after which there was a delay and the vehicle had to wait for some 45 minutes before it went to the mortuary behind the hospital, arriving there at about 6.15pm.

122.307 Although some evidence suggests the contrary, we are of the view that on this occasion the soldiers, when moving the bodies, did so with as much respect and decorum as was possible in the circumstances. We are not persuaded that they were boasting among themselves or behaving inappropriately at this stage.