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Crime Reduction Toolkits

Racist Incidents and Harassment

Crime - Let's bring it down
 
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Religion

Statutory definitions do not include religious groups. However, ways have been found to provide limited protection under the Race Relations Act 1976 to some religious groups, which have the characteristics of an ethnic group. In this way protection have been offered to Sikhs and Jewish people. The leading cases are: Mandla v Dowell Lee (1983) and Seide v Gillette Industries Ltd (1980) IRLR 427

Hepple, B. & Choudhury, T. (2001) Tackling Religious Discrimination: Practical Implications for Policy Makers & Legislators. Home Office Research Study 221.

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/horspubs1.html

The use of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry definition of a racist incident implies that religious hostility (e.g. Islamophobic attacks) should be treated as racist if this is the victimís perception.

Home Office Guidance regarding racially aggravated offences under the Crime & Disorder Act 1998 states that it is important to investigate whether an offence, which may appear to be motivated by religious hostility, also contains a racist element. Provided that part of the religious hostility is racist then a racist offence will have occurred.

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/cdact/racagoff.htm

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