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National Curriculum

Assessment in citizenship

 

About the non-statutory framework for PSHE and citizenship

At key stages 1 and 2 citizenship is part of the joint non-statutory framework for PSHE and citizenship. This framework does not include attainment targets. However, the level descriptions, which accompany the new secondary curriculum for citizenship, may provide a helpful guide to progression and attainment at key stages 1 and 2.

Making a judgement

Teachers, in discussion with pupils, will arrive at a rounded judgement by taking into account pupil achievements, strengths and areas for development across a range of contexts and over a period of time.

A single piece of work will not cover all the expectations set out in a level description. It will probably provide partial evidence of attainment in one or two aspects. A number of pieces and types of evidence from a range of contexts will be needed to make a judgement about overall performance. The evidence selected should demonstrate a pupil's:

  • knowledge and understanding about becoming an informed citizen

  • skills of enquiry and communication

  • skills of participation and responsible action.

Progression in citizenship

It is important to establish what prior citizenship learning has taken place and to lay a firm foundation for future citizenship learning.

The following shows what most pupils might be expected to achieve at the end of key stages 1 and 2 in citizenship. The descriptions are based on the joint non-statutory framework for PSHE and citizenship at key stages 1 and 2 .

Key stage 1

By the end of key stage 1, most pupils have knowledge and understanding about becoming informed citizens. They:

  • talk about and consider topics and issues, including moral and social dilemmas with others

  • begin to show understanding of simple citizenship concepts, for example right and wrong, fairness and rules

  • begin to show understanding of values, for example honesty, tolerance, respect and concern for others.

Most pupils demonstrate skills of enquiry and communication. They:

  • respond to simple questions and explain their own views and ideas in pairs and to the class

  • listen to the views of others.

Most pupils demonstrate skills of participation and responsible action. They:

  • take part in class and school citizenship activities, demonstrating they can work cooperatively and take and share responsibility

  • make real choices and know how to ask for help.

Key stage 2

By the end of key stage 2, most pupils have knowledge and understanding about becoming informed citizens. They:

  • investigate topical issues and problems using a range of sources provided, including the media, to find answers to simple questions or information and advice

  • show understanding of some citizenship concepts, for example rights, responsibilities, rules, right and wrong and fairness

  • show understanding of values, for example honesty, tolerance, respect and concern for others.

Most pupils demonstrate skills of enquiry and communication. They:

  • take part in simple discussions and debates on topical issues that affect themselves and others

  • express their opinions explaining their views

  • ask and respond to questions and listen to the view of others

  • understand that people may have different views on issues and use imagination to understand other people's experiences.

Most pupils demonstrate skills of participation and responsible action. They:

  • take part responsibly in group, class and school citizenship activities such as exploring alternatives and making choices

  • meet and talk with different adults from the community, for example nurse, police officer, councillor

  • begin to recognise that their actions affect themselves and others around them.

This content relates to the 1999 programmes of study and attainment targets.

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