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National Curriculum

Impact measures

 

Impact measures

QCDA has developed a suite of impact measures linked to the intended outcomes of the reforms. The New Secondary curriculum: Using national evidence to evaluate your curriculum illustrates these impact measures by providing an overview of some of the changes that schools have made, and the impact so far for their learners, drawing on national evidence. You may wish to select those measures which are relevant to your school's development or improvement plan. In doing so, you may also wish to select the most appropriate school data, whether quantitative or qualitative, to use as a baseline for evaluating the success of your curriculum.  In selecting and adapting the impact measures, each school can develop a plan for improvement that places the curriculum, assessment and pedagogy at the heart of what you do and enables you to answer the question 'how well are we achieving our aims?'.

The impact measures for secondary schools are:

  1. achieve high standards and make better progress

  2. narrow the gap and enable those not achieving age related expectations at age 11 to catch up with their peers

  3. have and be able to use high-quality personal, learning and thinking skills (PLTS) and become independent young people

  4. have and be able to use high-quality functional skills

  5. be challenged and stretched to achieve their potential

  6. increased commitment to and enjoyment of learning leading to  participation to 19 and beyond.

Impact measures 1 and 2

1. Achieve high standards and make better progress

Impact on the school curriculum offer: A curriculum which:

  • provides opportunities for the full range of  learners to achieve high standards

  • builds effective transition between and within key stages, programmes and courses

  • has Assessing Pupils' Progress (APP) built into curriculum design and planning

  • sets out progression routes within subjects, programmes and courses

Impact of the curriculum on young people: Increase in the percentage of young people who:

  • achieve 5 *A-C GCSEs at 16 including English and mathematics

  • achieve a level 2 Diploma

  • achieve other level 2 outcome measures (e.g. average points score, 1 or more A*-G at GCSE)

  • make better than expected levels of progress from key stage 2 to key stage 3 and key stage 4

  • report that they understand assessment criteria and are able to carry out peer and self-assessment accurately

  • work at entry level and level 1 and have an appropriate and relevant curriculum supported by a high quality set of qualifications that enables them to progress

2. Narrow the gap and enable those not achieving age related expectations at age 11 to catch up with their peers

Impact on the school curriculum offer. A curriculum which:

  • provides opportunities for young people to catch up with their peers especially in English and mathematics

  • focuses on motivating and engaging young people at risk of disengagement and dropout through a range of provision Impact of the curriculum on young people: Increase in the percentage of young people who did not achieve age related expectations at key stage 2:

  • close the gap with their peers by the end of key stage 3 in English and mathematics

  • close the gap with their peers by the end of key stage 4

The achievement gap between those entitled to free school meals and those not entitled to free school meals narrows.

Impact measures 3 and 4

3. Have and be able to use high-quality personal, learning and thinking skills (PLTS) and become independent young people

Impact on the school curriculum offer: A curriculum which:

  • embeds PLTS across the curriculum and identifies where PLTS are taught systematically

  • provides opportunities for independent learning (e.g. through assignments).

Schools use the PLTS framework to support and formatively assess young people’s progress in these areas.

Impact of the curriculum on young people: Increase in the percentage of:

  • young people who assess themselves as good team-workers, independent, effective participators, creative, reflective, self-managers

  • young people undertaking independent studies in and beyond school

  • young people joining in team and collaborative activities in and beyond school

  • young people who can identify their strengths and weaknesses in PLTS and plan for improvement

  • employers reporting increased confidence in PLTS capabilities of apprentices and young employees.

4. Have and be able to use high-quality functional skills

Impact on the school curriculum offer: A curriculum which:

  • embeds functional skills across the curriculum in real and relevant contexts 

  • develops approaches to support young people to identify their progress in functional skills

  • provides opportunities for one-to-one tuition in English, mathematics and ICT to support those who need to catch up with their peers.

Impact of the curriculum on young people: Increase in the percentage of:

  • young people acquiring functional skills across the curriculum 11-19

  • young people achieving level 2 functional skills at key stage 4

  • employers reporting increased confidence in functional skills in apprentices and young employees.

Impact measures 5 and 6

5. Be challenged and stretched to achieve their potential

Impact on the school curriculum offer: A curriculum which makes greater use of  the entire planned learning experience including:

  • opportunities for personalisation and curriculum choice for the full range of young people

  • provision for gifted and talented young people to be challenged

  • embedding work related learning into a wide range of curriculum contexts

  • offering a range of qualifications that reflect the needs and aspirations of young people, and the wider community

  • offering a programme of careers information and guidance that raises aspirations and challenges stereotypes.

Impact of the curriculum on young people: Increase in the percentage of young  people who:

  • are stretched and challenged by the curriculum offer

  • follow a broad curriculum

  • are able to assess their own aptitudes and interests

  • are able to make informed choices as reflected in pathways and options choices at 14 and 16

  • are able to make successful transitions at 14 and 16

  • achieve higher grades

  • enter a wider range of qualifications.

6. Increased commitment to and enjoyment of learning leading to  participation to 19 and beyond

Impact on the school curriculum offer: A curriculum which:

  • provides opportunities for young people to study in depth and links with and extends their interests;

  • builds a broad view of achievement through good assessment practice;

  • provides opportunities for young people to contribute to their learning and development;

  • provides opportunities for learning outside the classroom.

Impact of the curriculum on young people: Increase in the percentage of young  people who:

  • are committed to and enjoying their learning

  • report high quality learning experiences

  • intend to continue in learning beyond 16 (in education or training) 

  • participate in out-of school voluntary and community activities

  • take responsibility for their own learning 

  • undertake independent learning in and beyond school

  • attend school

  • have an offer or participating in education, training or a job with training.

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