Access Key Definitions
Skip navigation
Access key details
Home page
Latest updates
Site map
Search
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
Terms and conditions
National Curriculum

ICT in design and technology

 

ICT learning

ICT helps pupils learn in design and technology by stimulating their work, allowing them to accurately manufacture what they have designed, and helping them to manufacture real and quality products with a professional finish. It makes tasks easier and minimises differences between ability levels and previous experiences. Finally, ICT saves time and resources, which allows pupils time to be creative.

Using ICT can help pupils to:

  • access, select and interpret information

  • recognise patterns, relationships and behaviours

  • model, predict and hypothesise

  • test reliability and accuracy

  • review and modify their work to improve the quality

  • communicate with others and present information

  • evaluate their work

  • improve efficiency

  • be creative and take risks

  • gain confidence and independence.

For example, ICT can help pupils:

  • produce high-quality outcomes in a range of materials

  • explore contexts beyond their immediate experience

  • undertake supported self-study and work collaboratively at their own pace

  • simulate, research and practise manufacturing processes

  • gain transferable skills

  • speed up the making processes

  • control mechanisms

  • understand batch and mass production.

Pupils can enhance their learning by:

  • trying out software in small groups, which could be used to plan and display their ideas for products

  • using 'paint' software and a colour printer to produce patterns for use on their product

  • working as part of a team on a multimedia presentation

  • using an ICT control program to control mechanisms that move in different ways

  • gathering information as they generate ideas for products.

ICT statutory requirements

Pupils should be given opportunities to apply and develop their ICT capability through the use of ICT tools to support their learning. Here are the statutory requirements to use ICT in the design and technology programme of study.

Key stage 1

There is no statutory requirement to teach the use of ICT.

Key stage 2

Developing, planning and communicating ideas

1a: Generate ideas for products after thinking about who will use them and what they will be used for, using information from a variety of sources, including ICT-based sources.

Working with tools, equipment, materials and components to make quality products

2e: Use finishing techniques to strengthen and improve the appearance of their product, using a range of equipment including ICT (for example, 'drawing' software or computer-aided design (CAD) software and a printer).

Knowledge and understanding of materials and components

4c: How mechanisms can be used to make things move in different ways, using a range of equipment including an ICT control program.

ICT opportunities

Pupils should be given opportunities to apply and develop their ICT capability through the use of ICT tools to support their learning. Here are the opportunities to use ICT in the design and technology programme of study:

Key stage 1

Developing, planning and communicating ideas

1a: Generate ideas by drawing on their own and other people's experiences.

  • Pupils could use word-processing or desktop-publishing software and a printer to plan and display their ideas.

1e: Communicate their ideas using a variety of methods, including drawing and making models.

  • Pupils could use word-processing or desktop-publishing software and a printer to plan and display their ideas.

Working with tools, equipment, materials and components to make quality products

2e: Use simple finishing techniques to improve the appearance of their product, using a range of equipment.

  • Pupils could use 'paint' software and a colour printer to produce a pattern for finishing a product.

Key stage 2

Developing, planning and communicating ideas

1b: Develop ideas and explain them clearly, putting together a list of what they want their design to achieve.

  • Pupils could use desktop-publishing software and a colour printer to develop and communicate their design ideas.

1c: Plan what they have to do, suggesting a sequence of actions and alternatives, if needed.

  • Pupils could use desktop-publishing software and a colour printer to develop and communicate their design ideas.

1d: Communicate design ideas in different ways as these develop, bearing in mind aesthetic qualities, and the uses and purposes for which the product is intended.

  • Pupils could use desktop-publishing software and a colour printer to develop and communicate their design ideas.

Hardware and software

The following hardware can help pupils' learning in design and technology:

  • an A3 scanner

  • a 3D scanner

  • a laser printer

  • a colour inkjet printer

  • a 2D and 3D plotter

  • a vinyl cutter

  • a temperature probe and monitoring equipment

  • a milling machine

  • a lathe

  • a router

  • an embroiderer

  • a sewing machine

  • a weaving loom

  • a knitting machine

  • a conveyor oven

  • a plate freezer

  • an interactive whiteboard

  • a digital camera.

The following software can help pupils' learning in design and technology:

  • a 'paint' program

  • clip art

  • solid modelling software

  • a spreadsheet program

  • a desktop-publishing package

  • a presentation program

  • a texture mapping program

  • data logging software

  • software for manipulating digital images

  • circuit testing software

  • a control program

  • food analysis software

  • printed circuit board (PCB) software.

This content relates to the 1999 programmes of study and attainment targets.

Back to top