*
 Text only version  * Text only version
 *
 British Council Arts
 British Council Arts
 British Council Arts
 
 New Writing Anthology
 New Writing Anthology
 New Writing Anthology
Current issue About New Writing Other editions Writing Teachers' pages Readers' notes Author interviews
 *
 *
 Perform search  *
 *
 *
 *
 *
Link to teachers pages
Link to readers notes
Link to writing
Link to author interviews
 * GET YOUR COPY NOW!  *
How to order copies of New Writing. Read more

 

 * SUBMIT YOUR WRITING  *
Submissions to New Writing 15 are no longer being accepted. Submissions for New Writing 16 are not yet being accepted. Read more

 

 * BRIT LIT  *
Resource material to work with short stories for 15- to 17-year-old students, produced by the British Council and Portuguese Association of English Teachers (APPI). These kits provide the complete text of a short story along with extensive classroom activities. This kit also includes audio downloads of interviews with the author. Read more

 

 * JOIN OUR MAILING LIST  *

Keep ahead of the game with the best of New Writing. Be the first to know about new themes, new issues and any relevant events, news or workshops.

Read more

 

 *

New Writing 2

Edited by Malcolm Bradbury and Andrew Motion.
Minerva, 1993

 


Introduction by Andrew Motion

‘New’ writing, to deserve the name, must be more than recently-produced writing: several generations after Pound issued his celebrated edict (‘Make it new’), writers worth their salt are still discovering ways of obeying it.

Conventional wisdom tells us that Pound’s own efforts in this respect, like Eliot’s, were repudiated by the dominant British writers of the middle of the century. Post-war, post-experimental, they clustered round the Union Jack raised by Larkin, snarling at the ‘barbarity’ of artists they felt helped them ‘neither to enjoy nor endure’ life as they knew it. In the last quarter of the century we can see that the long fuses lit by the Modernists are still alight. Bunting has been given the credit he deserves. Young writers have opened themselves up to Continental and international influences. There is a greater acceptance of the range of authentic voices at home.

These are the changes which help to shape what is ‘new’ in contemporary writing. They are also the developments Malcolm Bradbury and I have tried to reflect in this anthology – Malcolm Bradbury being, on the whole, responsible for the prose, me for the poems. Sometimes the newness revitalizes familiar-seeming forms – as when, for instance, the compression and contained wildness in the stories by John McGahern and Alison Habens make the familiar strange. Sometimes it is more overt – in the poems by Iain Sinclair, Peter Reading, Grace Nichol and Selima Hill. In every case, it is a sign not only of health but of growth – of a tradition strengthening as it diversifies.

 

Contributors
John Agard, Brian W. Aldiss, Simon Armitage, James Berry, Glyn Brown, Mackay Brown, Amit Chandhuri, Robert Crawford, Helen Dunmore, Steve Ellis, Patricia Ferguson, Roy Fisher, Ester Freud, Carlo Gebler, Sarah Gracie, Alison Habens, Selima Hill, Michael Hofmann, Ted Hughes, Michael Longley, George MacBeth, Norman MacCraig, E. A. Markham, Glyn Maxwell, John McGahern, Deborah Moggach, Edwin Morgan, Mary Morrissy, Paul Muldoon, Margaret Mulvihill, Grace Nichols, Kathy Page, C. M. Rafferty, Peter Reading, Christopher Reid, Carol Rumens, Robert Saxton, Helen Simpson, Iain Sinclair, Anne Stevenson, George Szirtes, Gillian Tindall, Fay Weldon, Matthew Whyman, Hugo Young

 

*
The British Council is the United Kingdom's international organisation for educational opportunities and cultural relations.
We are registered in England as a charity. Our privacy statement. Our Freedom of Information Publications Scheme.
COPYRIGHT INFORMATION: All rights reserved. No part of this website may be reproduced, stored in or introduced to a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise) without prior written permission of the British Council. Any person who does any unauthorised act in relation to this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and civil claims for damages.