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Time Line 1950 - 1969


1950 The Metropolitan Police Roll of Honour is unveiled at Westminster Abbey by the Queen, displaying the names of officers killed in the 1914-1918 and 1939-1945 wars.    

1951 Commissioner Harold Scott introduces training of cadets aged 16 - 18 to become police officers.    

1952 The Dixon Report advocates many changes in the Metropolitan Police, including greater civilianisation.    

1953 Sir Harold Scott retires, and is replaced as Commissioner by Sir John Nott-Bower.

Sir John Nott-Bower


1954 Serious understaffing problems, with the force consisting of only 16,000 and needing an estimated 4,000 men, mainly Police Constables.    

1955 Formation of the Central Traffic Squad, consisting of 100 men.    

1956 Flying Squad makes over 1,000 arrests, a record since its formation.    

1957 New Information Room opens at New Scotland Yard.    

1958 Sir John Nott-Bower retires as Commissioner. He is replaced by Joseph Simpson.
Sir Joseph Simpson

Sir Joseph Simpson


1959 Indictable offences reach over 160,000, the highest recorded to date.    

1960 Traffic Wardens introduced.

Criminal Intelligence Section and Stolen Motor Vehicle Investigation branches established.

   

1961

The Receivers Office moved from Scotland House to new premises at Tintagel House.

The Minicab arrives on the London scene, and the Metropolitan Police obtain 24 convictions for illegal plying for hire.

   

1962 The rate of indictable crimes for this year reaches an all time high - 214,120.

The series 'Police 5', designed to prevent crime, begins on BBC.

   

1963 The Commissioner, Joseph Simpson, stresses the need for the Beat system to reduce motorised patrols and deter incidents of crime.

The first computer to be used by the Met (an ICT 1301) was set up in the office of the Receiver for use on pay and crime statistics.

   

1964 The worst year so far this century for crime, with over a quarter of a million indictable crimes.

Regional Crime Squads formed.

Police face major criticism and complaints as a result of the Challenor Case, in which a policeman was diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic and made infamous for planting evidence.

   

1965 Special Patrol Group formed consisting of 100 officers. It arrested 396 people in its first 9 months of operation.
first members of the Special Patrol Group

First members of the Special Patrol Group 1965


1966 The Commissioner's Office and the Receiver's Office are combined.

3 Metropolitan Police officers murdered at Shepherds Bush.

   

1967 The headquarters is moved from the Norman Shaw Building to a new building in Broadway, just off Victoria Street. The name of New Scotland Yard is retained.
Norwell Roberts joins the Met as the first black police officer. He retired after 30 years service with the rank of Detective Sergeant and received the QPM in 1996.
the revolving sign outside the new building

Revolving sign outside the new building


1968 Sir Joseph Simpson dies in service, and is replaced as Commissioner by John Waldron.
funeral of Sir Joseph Simpson

Sir Joseph Simpson's Funeral


1969 MPS officers sent to offer assistance in the Anguilla crisis.

Serious Crime Squad becomes permanent.

pc Joe Kennett in Anguilla

An MPS Officer in Anguilla.