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EXHIBITION HIGHLIGHTS

Design for the decoration of the end wall in a state room, Kedleston Hall

Kedleston Hall, design for the decoration of the end wall in a state room, James Stuart, 1757-8. Courtesy of Kedleston Hall, The Scarsdale Collection (The National Trust), © NTPL/ John Hammond

Kedleston Hall, design for the decoration of the end wall in a state room, James Stuart, 1757-8. Courtesy of Kedleston Hall, The Scarsdale Collection (The National Trust), © NTPL/ John Hammond (click image for larger version)

Stuart created two designs for the end walls of a state room, which may be two variations of designs for the same wall. One recess contains a portrait of Curzon, the owner of the Kedleston estate, and his wife. They are positioned above a Neo-classical sideboard table  which is flanked by scroll-footed pedestals with griffins, which were a prototype of Stuart's later designs for torchères at Spencer House.

In the second wall design, pictured here, Stuart depicted a temple-like structure, possibly intended to be an organ case with a canopy. Stuart must have meant to complete the central painting himself, as the figures of Bacchus and the lion and attendants were taken from the frieze of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates, Athens.