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News release - 18 March 2002

Teach-While-You-Train programme tops 3,000 people this year

The Teacher Training Agency (TTA) has awarded 840 more places on its popular Graduate Teacher Programme (GTP). This brings the total number of graduates taking up 'on the job' teacher training in schools to almost 3,200 this academic year. Around half of these will teach shortage subjects such as maths and science in secondary schools.

The help comes in the form of a new, free, interactive CD-ROM to help teachers work with the National Special Educational Needs Specialist Standards which were published by the Teacher Training Agency (TTA) in 1999.

The CD-ROM reflects the recently revised DfES Special Educational Needs Code of Practice. It features 16 video case studies of teachers working with pupils in a range of mainstream classroom settings. There is informative commentary as well as a search facility for teachers to look for areas that are of particular interest to them. The SEN Specialist Standards are also included in full as a background resource.

Jill Staley, Director of Teacher Training Strategy at the Teacher Training Agency said:

'Teachers are committed to the high achievement of all their pupils but may need further knowledge and skills to help pupils with special educational needs to reach their full potential. Teachers at all stages of their career can work with this resource. As well as helping teachers to build a personal training profile, the CD ROM aims to give them practical ideas and approaches to meeting the learning needs of children in their classes.'

To obtain a free copy of the CD-ROM, visit the publications section of the TTA website, telephone the TTA's publications line on 0845 606 0323, or e-mail ttapublications@iforcegroup.com

Click here to visit the Special Educational Needs area of the TTA website.

Notes to Editors

  1. The CD-ROM reflects the revised DfES Special Educational Needs Code of Practice which was issued to all schools in December 2001 and which became effective from 1 January 2002.
  2. The CD-ROM also draws heavily on the TTA's National Special Educational Needs Specialist Standards, published in 1999. The Standards were designed as an audit tool to help teachers and headteachers to identify specific training and development needs in relation to the effective teaching of pupils with severe and/or complex SEN.
  3. The Teacher Training Agency was established under the Education Act 1994. Its purpose is to raise standards in schools by attracting able and committed people into teaching and by improving the quality of teacher training. The Agency is responsible for a wide range of initiatives to promote recruitment to the teaching profession; for funding initial teacher training, which is linked to the quality of the training provision as identified through OFSTED inspection; for supporting initial teacher training providers to improve their provision; for developing the standards for award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS); and working with the New Opportunities Fund for the provision of training in the use of ICT in subject teaching
  4. The following schools helped to produce the CD-ROM and are featured as casestudies within it:
    • Bushey Meads School, Watford
    • Cambridge School, Hammersmith W. London
    • Cams Hill School, Fareham, Hants
    In addition, more than 29,000 people are expected to begin teacher training on undergraduate and postgraduate courses during the current academic year - the highest number for seven years.

     

    The Graduate Teacher Programme was established in 1997/8 as a new route into teaching for those over 24 years old. GTP trainees receive a salary to work in schools while they follow an individual programme of teacher training leading to Qualified Teacher Status.

    The TTA received over 1,100 applications from people wishing to start on this programme during the summer term, and has awarded:

    • 630 places which will give the school both a grant towards training costs and a grant towards the trainee's salary
    • 210 places which will give the school a training grant only, on the basis that it can fund the full salary from other sources.

    School Standards Minister Stephen Timms said:

    'Thanks to the extra training-grant places that we announced in September 2001, more than twice as many people have been able to start the GTP this year. In the last four school years, the Graduate Teacher Programme has brought well over 6,000 career-changers into teaching. Almost half of them are in the secondary shortage subjects, where demand for teachers is greatest.

    'Recruiting, retaining and rewarding teachers are crucial factors in our drive to raise standards in all our schools. We have increased salaries for newly-qualified teachers and reformed pay structures to reward good teachers more quickly for their hard work. We remain committed to finding a new way of working to tackle excessive workload and are working closely with employers and unions to achieve this.

    'Buoyant demand for both the GTP and conventional training routes show how much more attractive careers in teaching are becoming.'

    Ralph Tabberer, Chief Executive of the TTA, said:

    'The GTP is proving increasingly popular with both applicants and schools. It began in 1998 with just 89 places and is growing rapidly. The number of applications we received for this years' summer term starts was almost twice as many as for the same period last year. The tougher competition for places has brought a noticeable increase in the quality of the applications submitted.

    'Providing different routes into teaching gives every able and committed candidate an opportunity to join the profession and make a real difference to young lives. All these routes require candidates to reach the same high standards needed to gain Qualified Teacher Status.

    'Places on the GTP have been awarded to the best qualified candidates, who will train in particularly good schools and will be supported by the strongest training programmes. Although number of places available on the GTP is limited, every person who was unsuccessful this time can request advice on other routes into teaching, such as one of the 1,500 places on part-time, flexible courses.'

    NOTES FOR EDITORS

    1. The GTP enables trainees aged 24 or more to work as unqualified teachers while following an individual programme of teacher training leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). The programme normally takes a year but can be shortened for people with teaching experience. The TTA pays schools a grant of up to £13,000 in a full year towards the cost of employing the trainee and up to £4,000 to the school or its training provider for training costs. From January 2002, additional places can be awarded on the basis of training grants only, where schools are able to meet trainees' salary costs. Candidates are put forward by recommending bodies - schools, training providers and other organisations - and places are allocated by the TTA on the basis of advice from a panel of independent experts. Unsuccessful candidates from this round are invited to obtain feedback, and can request to be contacted by a consultant at the Teaching Information Line (tel: 0845 6000 991) for advice on other routes into teaching.

      Priority categories for GTP places are:
      • secondary shortage subjects (mathematics, science, information technology,design and technology, modern
        foreign languages and English;
      • primary teachers specialising in mathematics, science or technology;
      • under-represented groups - men into primary, minority ethnic teachers,teachers with disabilities;
      • other good quality applications in any subject or phase;
      • people currently working as Teaching Assistants.
    2. In addition, a special GTP for overseas-trained teachers (OTTs) provides an assessment-only route with the option of a short training programme if needed. The TTA pays grant for assessment and, where necessary, training but does not provide a salary grant. More than 300 OTTs have been taken on to the programme in the current school year.
    3. The TTA has undertaken a review of the operation of the GTP, following the Government's commitment in its White Paper 'Schools achieving success' to make the programme more flexible. The outcome of the review will be published shortly on the TTA's website.
    4. The Teacher Training Agency was established under the Education Act 1994. Its purpose is to raise standards in schools by attracting able and committed people into teaching and by improving the quality of teacher training. The Agency is responsible for a wide range of initiatives to promote recruitment to the teaching profession; for funding Initial Teacher Training; for further development of the standards for award of Qualified Teacher Status; and working with the New Opportunities Fund for the provision of training in the use of ICT in subject teaching.


MEDIA ENQUIRIES:
TTA Press Office Tel: 0207 925 3855/3735. Out of hours 07771 934629.
email: pressoffice@teach-tta.gov.uk

GENERAL ENQUIRIES: 0207 925 3700
Prospective applicants to the Graduate Teacher Programme should contact the Teaching Information Line 0845 6000 991.