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Theft monitoring

Institutions which suffer crimes against their collections are encouraged to report these cases to MLA so that such information can contribute to the overall picture of crime related to the sector. Such information is also circulated confidentially to give others the opportunity to learn from another's experience.

Crime File Form (Word 200KB)format: doc

Placing Advertisements

Consider placing advertisements in the following publications:

Antiques Trade Gazette
115 Shaftesbury Avenue
London
WC2H 8AD
Tel: 020 7930 7193

Art Loss Register
13 Grosvenor Place
London
SW1X 7HH

Tel: 020 7930 7193
Email: artloss@artloss.com
Website: http://www.artloss.com

Salvo
PO Box 28080
London
SE27 0RH

Tel: 020 8761 2316

Email: admin@salvoweb.com
Web: http://www.salvoweb.com

Trace Magazine - Thesaurus Group Ltd
Mill Court
Furrlongs
Newport
Isle of Wight
PO30 2AA

Tel: 01983 826000
Website: http://www.Invaluable.com

Object Identification Checklist

Reports should use the Object ID Checklist as created by the Getty Information Institute:

Take Photographs

Photographs are of vital importance in identifying and recovering stolen objects. In addition to overall views, take close-ups of inscriptions, markings, and any damage or repairs. If possible, include a scale or object of known size in the image.

Answer These Questions:

  • Type of Object
    What kind of object is it (e.g., painting, sculpture, clock, mask)?

  • Materials & Techniques
    What materials is the object made of (e.g., brass, wood, oil on canvas)? How was it made (e.g., carved, cast, etched)?

  • Measurements
    What is the size and/or weight of the object? Specify which unit of measurement is being used (e.g., cm., in.) and to which dimension the measurement refers (e.g., height, width, depth).

  • Inscriptions & Markings
    Are there any identifying markings, numbers, or inscriptions on the object (e.g., a signature, dedication, title, maker's marks, purity marks, property marks)?

  • Distinguishing Features
    Does the object have any physical characteristics that could help to identify it (e.g., damage, repairs, or manufacturing defects)?

  • Title
    Does the object have a title by which it is known and might be identified (e.g., The Scream)?

  • Subject
    What is pictured or represented (e.g., landscape, battle, woman holding child)?

  • Date or Period
    When was the object made (e.g., 1893, early 17th century, Late Bronze Age)?

  • Maker
    Do you know who made the object? This may be the name of a known individual (e.g., Thomas Tompion), a company (e.g., Tiffany), or a cultural group (e.g., Hopi).

  • Write a Short Description
    This can also include any additional information which helps to identify the object (e.g., color and shape of the object, where it was made).

  • Keep It Secure
    Having documented the object, keep this information in a secure place.

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