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In 2011, Jisc convened a Researcher ID Task and Finish Group to analyse the need for identifiers for researchers and to propose a solution for the UK. Informed by a number of reports, the group made a series of recommendations. Chief amongst these was the recommendation that the UK should move to adopt the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID).

ORCID as the proposed researcher identifier solution

In 2011, Jisc convened a Researcher ID Task and Finish Group to analyse the need for identifiers for researchers and to propose a solution for the UK. Informed by a number of reports, the group made a series of recommendations. Chief amongst these was the recommendation that the UK should move to adopt the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID).

Jisc, on behalf of the group, then commissioned a consultation with the research community  which found broad support for the main recommendations:

Researcher ID Consultation Report

On the basis of this evidence, the group of partners has endorsed the following joint statement:

Joint Statement

For an outline of next steps see:

Draft Implementation Plan


Background on ORCID

ORCID enables works, such as research papers published in scholarly journals, to be attributed to their rightful creator, despite any ambiguity over the author’s name. Ambiguity arises when different forms of a name are used for the same person, or when a researcher changes their name, or has a common name shared by many others.  ORCID assigns a unique identifier to each researcher, thus overcoming this problem of name ambiguity. 

By creating automatic links between mentions of a researcher’s identifier, for example in publications, grants and patents, ORCID can save researchers and organisations time when performing many standard research management processes.  For example, when

  • completing the identifying information required when submitting grant proposals to funders, or manuscripts to publications
  • updating records in an institutional repository
  • updating a researcher’s CV

A unique identifier also makes it easier for universities and funding agencies to link research funding with the outputs that resulted, such as publications, patents, or commercial interest.

A researcher can apply to ORCID for their unique identifier, or a research organisation can apply on behalf of its employees. The researcher, however, controls their record. This includes granting trusted partners, such as employer, funder or publisher, permission to update their record.  For example, a researcher could ensure their ORCID record is current by allowing a publisher to update it with publication metadata when a manuscript is accepted.

Further information about ORCID, including how to use it is available at http://about.orcid.org/

Blog post on how to make use of your ORCID record

Contact

For more information contact Jisc programme manager Verena Weigert