This snapshot, taken on
22/01/2014
, shows web content acquired for preservation by The National Archives. External links, forms and search may not work in archived websites and contact details are likely to be out of date.
 
 
The UK Government Web Archive does not use cookies but some may be left in your browser from archived websites.

LEVESON INQUIRY:
CULTURE, PRACTICE
AND ETHICS OF THE PRESS

About the Inquiry

Process

The Leveson Inquiry into the culture, practices and ethics of the press was aproached in four Modules. These are:

  • Module 1: The relationship between the press and the public and looks at phone-hacking and other potentially illegal behaviour.
  • Module 2: The relationships between the press and police and the extent to which that has operated in the public interest.
  • Module 3: The relationship between press and politicians.
  • Module 4: Recommendations for a more effective policy and regulation that supports the integrity and freedom of the press while encouraging the highest ethical standards.

Requests for written evidence in relation to Module 1 were sent out in August 2011 and Lord Justice Leveson also invited comments, evidence and submissions from any other interested parties.  As part of this process, Lord Justice Leveson held a series of seminars in September and October to set the context for the Inquiry.  Formal evidence hearings for Module 1 started on 14 November at the Royal Courts of Justice.  The other Modules followed a similar pattern, with the evidence hearings for Module 3 finishing on 26 June 2012.

The Inquiry published submissions received from the industry in response to the Draft Criteria for an effective Regulatory Regime in June 2012. These proposals can be found here. These were considered further during the Module 4 hearings, which ran from 9 July 2012 until final closing submissions on 24 July 2012.