Review of counter-terrorism powers

In July 2010 the Home Secretary announced the review of key counter-terrorism and security powers.

Review of key counter-terrorism and security powers

This included:

  • control orders
  • section 44 stop and search powers and the use of terrorism legislation in relation to photography. Recommendations in respect of the stop and search powers were partially implemented by The Terrorism Act 2000 (Remedial) Order 2011 on 16 March 2011. These have now been fully implemented by the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. The counter-terrorism stop and search powers and associated code of practice came into force on 10 July 2012
  • the use of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA) by local authorities and access to communications data more generally
  • extending the use of ‘deportations with assurances’ in a manner that is consistent with our legal and human rights obligations
  • measures to deal with organisations that promote hatred and violence
  • pre-charge detention, including alternatives to the current measures and possibilities for increased safeguards.

Terms of reference for the review were published on 27 July 2010.

Review findings

The review documents of the counter-terrorism and security powers were published on 26 January 2011. These include:

  • Review findings and recommendations
  • Summary of responses to the consultation
  • Equality impact assessment
  • A report by Lord Macdonald of River Glaven QC

Review of Prevent

The Home Office also carried out a review of the Prevent strand of CONTEST.

The review

Last year, the government launched a review in to the Prevent strategy. This review has been independently overseen by Lord Carlile of Berriew.

The review found that the previous Prevent programme was flawed. It confused the delivery of government policy to promote integration with government policy to prevent terrorism. It failed to tackle the extremist ideology at the heart of the threat we face, and in trying to reach those at risk of radicalisation, funding sometimes even reached the very extremist organisations that Prevent should have been confronting.

There is now a clear separation between Prevent - lead by the Home Office, and integration - lead by Communities and Local Government.

See the Prevent strategy documentation.

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