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Wednesday, 3 October 2012

Guide to dealing with losing your job

The prospect of losing your job is difficult to plan for at the best of times, but you have rights that are protected by law. This section helps you to make sense of redundancy or dismissal, enabling you to manage your finances and reconsider your options for the future.

Changes to age discrimination for over 50s

New regulations came into force on 1 October 2006 that make it unlawful for employers to discriminate against workers on the grounds of age. The laws mean workers of all ages have an equal chance of training and promotion in England, Wales and Scotland.

Redundancy

If you think you're going to be made redundant, you need to be clear on what the law says. Your employer has responsibilities. Find out what they are and what your rights are if you're made redundant.

Reasons why you can be dismissed

There are various reasons why your employer might dismiss you. There are fair and unfair reasons for dismissal and a right to have a written statement explaining why you have been dismissed. Regardless of the reason for your dismissal, your employer must also act fairly in the procedure they follow. If they don't the dismissal may be unfair.

Constructive dismissal

Constructive dismissal happens when an employee is forced to quit their job against their will because of their employer's conduct. Find information about what you can do if you feel that you have to leave your job.

Unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal means you've been dismissed from your job and your employer doesn't have a valid reason for dismissing you and/or has acted unreasonably. Find out about your rights and how you can try to sort out the problem.

Notice and notice pay

When you finish a job you should normally give or be given notice. Find out how much notice you or your employer must give, the rules on what payment you should receive and your other rights and responsibilities.

Your rights if your employer is insolvent

If your employer becomes insolvent you have a number of options open to you. Find out about the details of what to do if you're owed money by an insolvent employer and how insolvency affects your employment status.

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