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Find out more about National Statistics

Citizenship Survey: April - September 2008, England

Published 29 January 2009
Type(s) Statistics
Site Corporate
Product code 08RFC05728
ISBN 9781409810780
Price Free

Summary

The latest national statistics from the Citizenship Survey produced by Communities and Local Government were released on Thursday 29 January.

Statistics from the Citizenship Survey for England and Wales include data covering a range of issues including community cohesion, empowerment, values, racial and religious prejudice and discrimination, volunteering and charitable giving.

Data in the statistical release are based on England, with the exception of the Labour Market Discrimination figures which are based on England and Wales.

The latest statistics report on the first and second quarters of the 2008-09 survey, covering April to September 2008, and update those previously released on 16 October 2008 (April to June 2008).

Key statistics from the release include:

  • In April-September 2008, 39 per cent of people felt they could influence decisions in their local area, a similar proportion to 2007-08 (38 per cent) but lower than in 2001 (44 per cent).
  • Twenty-two per cent of people felt they could influence decisions affecting Great Britain, a similar proportion to 2007-08 (20 per cent).
  • In April-September 2008, 41 per cent of adults volunteered formally at least once in the 12 months prior to interview, with 26 per cent having volunteered formally at least once a month.
  • In April-September 2008, 82 per cent of people perceived their community as cohesive, agreeing that their local area is a place where people from different backgrounds got on well together. This figure is unchanged since 2007-08, but represents an increase from 80 per cent in 2005.
  • Seventy-six per cent of people felt they belonged strongly to their neighbourhood. This figure is unchanged since 2007-08 (75 per cent), but has increased since 2003 (70 per cent).
  • In April-September 2008, 81 per cent of people were satisfied with their local area as a place to live.
  • Older people were more likely to be satisfied with their local area than younger people. Levels of satisfaction were highest among those aged 75 years and over (88 per cent) and lowest among those aged 16-24 years (76 per cent).
  • Overall, 81 per cent of people mixed socially at least once a month with people from different ethnic or religious backgrounds, either at work, at a place of education, through a leisure activity, at a place or worship, at the shops or through volunteering. This is unchanged since 2007-08 (80 per cent) when it was first measured.
  • In April-June 2008, 10 per cent of people felt that racial or religious harassment was a very or fairly big problem in their local area, higher than in 2007-08 (9 per cent).
  • A higher proportion of people from minority ethnic groups (20 per cent) thought that racial or religious harassment was a very or fairly big problem compared to White people (9 per cent).
  • Eight per cent of people from minority ethnic groups compared to two per cent of White people felt they had been refused a job for reasons of race. Seven per cent of people from minority ethnic backgrounds felt they had experienced discrimination on the grounds of their race when seeking promotion compared to less than 0.5 per cent of White people.

The full Citizenship Survey Statistical Release and the accompanying tables are available to download below.

Notes

1. The Citizenship Survey, run by NatCen on behalf of the Cohesion Research Unit within Communities and Local Government, is a household survey covering a representative core sample of 10,000 adults in England and Wales each year. There is also a minority ethnic boost sample of 5,000 to ensure that the views of these groups are robustly represented. 

2. The data are collected through face-to-face interviews. The Citizenship Survey was first carried out in 2001. Since 2007-08, the survey has moved to a continuous design, allowing the provision of headline findings on a quarterly basis. This statistical release is based on the first and second quarters of data from the 2008-09 survey (April-September 2008), which is made up of 4664 core interviews and an additional 2832 interviews with people from minority ethnic groups.

3. The statistics relating to labour market discrimination refer to England and Wales, whereas those relating to cohesion, empowerment and volunteering relate to England only.  This reflects the coverage of policy responsibilities.

4. The statistics from the Citizenship Survey are produced to high professional standards, as set out in the National Statistics Code of Practice. For more information on National Statistics see: www.statistics.gov.uk (external link).

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