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Behind The Headlines

Your guide to the science that makes the news

'On demand caesareans' recommended on the NHS

Wednesday Nov 23 2011

'On demand caesareans' recommended on the NHS

Any pregnant woman can now ‘demand’ a caesarean section regardless of medical need, much of the media has reported. Many of the reports focus on mothers who fear birth trauma now having the right to request a caesarean. The reports are based on new...

Child paracetamol doses revised

Monday Nov 21 2011

Child paracetamol doses revised

The UK’s drug regulator has issued new dosage guidelines for children’s liquid medicines such as Calpol and Disprol. The new, age-specific guidance stipulates exact doses of liquid paracetamol medicines that should be given to children...

Autism 'may develop in the womb'

Friday Nov 11 2011

Autism 'may develop in the womb'

Children with autism may have too many cells in the brain regions responsible for emotional development, the Daily Mail has reported. The newspaper also said that so far genetics appear to be involved in less than a fifth of cases...

Do big babies turn into obese kids?

Tuesday Nov 8 2011

Do big babies turn into obese kids?

“Bigger babies are more likely to become obese,” exclaims the Daily Mail, also reporting that parents should not assume their overweight children “are going to grow out of it”. This is based on a study that took weight...

New caesarean guidelines proposed

Monday Oct 31 2011

New caesarean guidelines proposed

Several newspapers have reported that all pregnant women will “get the right to a caesarean”, regardless of whether there is a medical reason for having one. Currently, around one in four UK babies is delivered...

Ovary cancer risk from IVF is small

Thursday Oct 27 2011

Ovary cancer risk from IVF is small

IVF doubles the risk of non-fatal ovarian cancer, The Daily Telegraph has today reported. The newspaper said that a study on almost 30,000 women who were struggling to get pregnant found that tumours were more common in...

Labour induction methods compared

Tuesday Oct 25 2011

Labour induction methods compared

According to the Daily Mail, a method of inducing labour that dates back to the 1930s “has been found to work as well as modern treatments but with fewer side effects”. The news is based on a large Dutch trial that examined...

Do fizzy drinks make teens violent?

Tuesday Oct 25 2011

Do fizzy drinks make teens violent?

“Teens who down more than five cans of soft fizzy drinks a week are more likely to be violent or carry a weapon,” reported the Daily Mirror. It said that researchers believe the “sugar or caffeine content in carbonated, non-diet drinks...

BPA chemical studied for behaviour changes

Monday Oct 24 2011

BPA chemical studied for behaviour changes

“A chemical used in plastic that is ubiquitous in the food and drink industries has been linked with emotional and behavioural problems in girls when they are exposed to it before birth,” reported The Independent.

Pregnant women advised to get flu jab

Thursday Oct 20 2011

Pregnant women advised to get flu jab

“Pregnant women were urged to get their annual flu jab yesterday as research showed they have a five times greater risk of a stillbirth if they are admitted to hospital with swine flu,” reported The Independent.

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What is Behind the Headlines?

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