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Year 6 literacy revision Unit 1 – Reading and writing narrative

Reading and writing narrative (and plays) (3 weeks)

This unit is specifically designed to revisit and revise the reading and writing of fiction and play texts, and is probably best placed in the late spring or early summer of Year 6, prior to the National Curriculum tests.

Phase 1

Children practise reading and answering questions about fiction and play texts.

Phase 2

Children revisit and revise the features of a good short story and playscript. They practise writing a short story or play, drawing on language and organisational features relevant to the genre and audience.

Phase 3

Children revise, explore and extend their previous knowledge of various sentence structures (including complex sentences). They practise writing a different story or play, adding a focus on varied sentences to that of using appropriate genre features.

Phase 4

Children revise, explore and extend their ability to construct and use paragraphs appropriately in narrative. They again practise writing a different story, now adding a focus on paragraph use to those on varying sentences and employing appropriate text features.

Note: In order to ensure children's enthusiasm and engagement throughout this revision unit, it is essential to ensure that the content of the reading material and subject matter for the writing activities is lively and engaging (it can be drawn from any other curriculum area or areas or integrated into any theme of your choosing) and that the activities themselves are presented as games and explorations, rather than tedious exercises.