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Year 6 Non-fiction Unit 2 – Journalistic writing

Journalistic writing (3 weeks)

This is a relatively free-standing non-fiction unit, and can be taught at any stage of Year 6. However, whenever it is taught, the level of reading and writing expected and the word, sentence and presentation skills integrated within it must clearly move forward from previous learning towards end-of-year expectations. It can be readily linked to other areas of the curriculum.

Phase 1

Children read, explore, discuss and compare a wide range of journalistic news reports, in a variety of formats, on paper and on screen.

Phase 2

Children listen to and compare a number of news reports in oral (radio) format. They take notes as a means of engaging with them. They are then introduced to a news incident (on which they will later be asked to report) and they explore the incident and its protagonists through role-play and drama.

Phase 3

Children reread and analyse some of the journalistic news texts, both in written and aural formats. They identify key language, structure, organisation and presentational features, as preparation for writing.

Phase 4

Following teacher modelling, children write a news report about the incident explored earlier. They then use this as a basis for a script which they present orally as a radio news item. The phase can then be extended into a one-day cross-curricular radio newsroom simulation as a form of writing workshop.

Overview

  • Comment critically on the language, style, success of examples of non-fiction such as periodicals, reviews, reports, leaflets.
  • Develop a journalistic style through considering: balanced and ethical reporting, what is of public interest in events, the interest of the reader, selection and presentation of information.
  • Use the styles and conventions of journalism to report on, for example real or imagined events.

1998 Framework objectives covered:

Year 6, Term 1: T12 and T15 comment critically on the language, style, success of examples of non-fiction such as periodicals, reviews, reports, leaflets; develop a journalistic style through considering: balanced and ethical reporting, what is of public interest in events, the interest of the reader, selection and presentation of information; T16 use the styles and conventions of journalism to report on, for example, real or imagined events.

Year 6, Term 3: T19 review a range of non-fiction text types and their characteristics, discussing when a writer might choose to write in a given style and form; T22 select the appropriate style and form to suit a specific purpose and audience, drawing on knowledge of different non-fiction text types.