This snapshot, taken on
10/08/2011
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Moving from Focusing to Developing

Choose the box that you have identified from the review of the progression table.

Moving from F1 to D1
F1 D1
Most feedback is about effort or behaviour and is not related to learning objectives or outcomes. Feedback is often related to the learning objectives and outcomes, providing the opportunity for pupils to respond.

How do I get there?

  • Select a series of lessons that will be taught in the near future.
    • Check and plan where necessary to incorporate and sharpen the How science works (HSW) learning objectives in your planning.
  • Share these HSW objectives with the pupils.
    • Inform the pupils that oral feedback will relate directly to the HSW learning objectives.
Moving from F2 to D2
F2 D2
Comments from pupils on each other's work are not well focused and go unchallenged. Specific oral feedback as a class, individually or in a small-group setting provides opportunities for specific, useful responses including pupil–teacher feedback.

How do I get there?

  • Select one teaching group and plan opportunities over the following four weeks to work with individuals, pairs or groups of pupils on focused How science works (HSW) learning objectives.
  • Concentrate your oral feedback on these HSW objectives.
  • Plan to give specific feedback to challenge pupils to improve their work.
  • Ask teachers to bring pupils' work to a subsequent meeting and evaluate the impact of the approach on pupils' progress in science.
  • Within a departmental meeting evaluate the effect of this and plan further opportunities for development.
Moving from F3 to D3 and F4 to D4
F3 D3
There is awareness that oral feedback needs to relate to the learning objectives and outcomes. Oral feedback is becoming more focused on learning objectives and outcomes.
F4 D4
Oral feedback is spontaneous but not planned. Opportunities for oral feedback are beginning to be developed including teacher–pupil, pupil–pupil and pupil–teacher.

How do I get there?

  • Select one teaching group and plan opportunities over the following four weeks to focus oral feedback on learning objectives.
  • Plan open-ended questions to stimulate and challenge pupils' thinking.
  • Try to anticipate possible pupil responses to open-ended questions and oral interventions.
  • At the end of the four-week period evaluate successes and issues arising in order to move this forward into regular lesson planning.
Moving from F6 to D6
F6 D5
Oral feedback focuses on teacher–pupil non-specific interactions. Different types of oral feedback start to emerge, including questioning to probe progress against the learning objectives and outcomes to help pupils improve their work.
  D6
  Specific individuals and/or groups of pupils are targeted for feedback in lessons.

How do I get there?

  • With a colleague, observe each other teaching and record how specific and positive individual pieces of feedback are perceived to be. Record how positive/negative and specific/non-specific each example of oral feedback is during the lessons.
  • Use this summary to highlight particular development needs for the teacher observed.
  • These could include trialling a variety of types of oral feedback, focusing on individual, pairs or groups of pupils.
  • Aim to link oral feedback to specific learning objectives and outcomes from the lesson.
Moving from F7 to D7
F7 D7
There is little pupil–pupil dialogue about the learning objectives and outcomes. Opportunities are provided for pupils to give feedback to their peers (in relation to learning outcomes).

How do I get there?

  • Plan to provide opportunities for pupil-generated work with clear shared success criteria (based on the lesson outcomes) for one module.
  • Ask pupils to discuss with each other whether they have achieved these.
  • Ask them to try to give feedback to each other on how to improve their work based on the success criteria.