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Crisps and healthy eating

Assessment focuses

AF1, AF3, AF5

Context

As part of work on healthy eating, pupils had previously added iodine solution to various foods, including crisps, and had been taught that the foods that turned black contained carbohydrates and were energy-providing foods.

They were taught about the nutritional information on food packaging, including ‘traffic light’ systems and alternative approaches, and had made judgements about whether food manufacturers were concealing information.

They looked, in particular, at different types of crisps, and recorded how much fat and salt each contained in order to investigate which are the healthiest. They chose to present results either as bar charts or in tables.

The evidence

A pupil's hand-written work and hand-drawn graph showing the amount of fat in different types of crisps.

The content on the page says: " Healthy eating Crisps provide three key nutrients:- -Carbo-hydrates -Fat -Salt But, too much fat and salt are not good for our health. TASK:- Which crisps are healthiest to eat? My results are overleaf." The horizontal or x axis of the graph is labelled with Crisps. The vertical or y axis is labelled Fat (g). The following results are recorded: Skips contain 0.5 grams of fat  Wotsits contain 0.58 grams of fat Walkers contain 0.82 grams of fat McCoys contain 0.93 grams of fat Hula hoops contain 0.71 grams of fat Chipsticks contain 0.5 grams of fat  

A child's hand-drawn graph showing the amount of salt in different types of crisps.

The horizontal or x axis is labelled with Crisps. The vertical or y axis is labelled with salt (g). The following results are recorded: Skips contain 0.2 grams of salt Wotsits contain 0.15 grams of salt Walkers contain 0.2 grams of salt McCoys contain 0.2 grams of salt Chipsticks contain 0.2 grams of salt Hula hoops contain 0.82 grams of salt

Teacher's notes

Ciaran gave fat and salt quantities in grams rather than in grams per specified mass of crisps. When this was pointed out to him he said that the amounts were all ‘per packet', and that packets all had the same ‘weight’ of crisps.

He said it was difficult to say which crisps were the healthiest as those with the least amount of fat (Skips) did not have the least amount of salt, and those with least amount of salt (Wotsits) did not have the least amount of fat.

Next steps

Consideration of other investigations where the question being asked may not provide definitive answers

Assessment commentary

Ciaran relates the science, including the secondary data that he has collected, to health issues. He chooses appropriate presentation of data and draws a valid conclusion, emphasising uncertainty from the two sets of data.