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Geometry and measures progression map

The 'Geometry and measures' strand has two progression maps to support teachers.

  • Geometry
  • Measures

What are the progression maps?

The progression maps provide a set of mathematical learning objectives, organised into a series of up to 10 'steps' for each strand of mathematics. The number of steps in a strand depends on the complexity or level of difficulty of the mathematical concepts involved. The steps are not directly related to National Curriculum levels; instead, they identify a detailed progression sequence for key aspects of learning mathematics supported by:

  • examples of what pupils should know and be able to do
  • probing questions that you can use to gauge understanding and progress
  • suggestions for actions to take when pupils encounter a barrier to learning.

How do I use the progression maps?

  • Use the examples of what pupils should know and be able to do to identify the appropriate stages of pupils’ learning and confirm that teaching is pitched at the right level.
  • Use the probing questions to help you decide whether the pupils have understood the mathematics.
  • If you have a pupil or a group of pupils who clearly have not understood, use the section 'What to do if pupils find this a barrier', which provides example teaching materials and some suggestions of how understanding can be developed.

  • Geometry

    Each step contains objectives and examples of what pupils should be able to do in geometry to help you identify the appropriate stages of pupils’ learning. Probing questions and suggestions for when pupils encounter a barrier to learning provided for each objective can be used to help pupils to progress.

  • Measures

    Each step contains objectives and examples of what pupils should be able to do in measures to help you identify the appropriate stages of pupils’ learning. Probing questions and suggestions for when pupils encounter a barrier to learning provided for each objective can be used to help pupils to progress.