Question 5

What methods of access to datasets would most benefit you or your organisation?

  • Anonymous

    Bulk data downloaded by secure ftp

  • http://www.mjc2.com Julian Stephens

    Web-based download.

  • Derek Hunter

    FTP download.

    I’m not too worried about format. Translating between formats is just something you have to do. I’d just like to see the data out there and available.

  • Tim Thornton

    FTP download, with notifications of updates where data is not static.
    Also, a tool to find the data sets required. There are dozens of “data index” sites around the web from various projects that have started up and lost steam or funding. If there were a searchable central repository of metadata, that would be highly valuable – psychemedia’s comments make a lot of sense here

  • Sheelagh F M Keddie

    Firstly easy to find through a search engine without knowing the formal description of the dataset! sometimes I don’t know whther what I’m looking for is available or how. Then selectively and wholly downloadable so that I can extract and manipulate the data.

  • http://twitter.com/CountCulture Chris Taggart

    It depends on the data. Sometimes a static file is absolutely fine (reports, budgets, performance data), and frankly it doesn’t matter much wheter this is accessed as a web download, FTP or some other method; other times (e.g. transport, databases that are constantly changing) an API is most suitable.

    However all this is far, far less important than the data being made available under the Open Government Licence. I would rather have a CSV file under an open licence than an API with a restricted licence every time.

  • Gene Mares

    Anything is good, as long as information structure and access methods are clearly and unambiguously documented. While modern data formats have some advantage, a simple CSV text file is just as valuable, if information is well described. It’s the data that counts.

  • http://twitter.com/smithsam Sam

    Simple access to raw files for inspection and modelling; and an *optional* API based on that (from yourselves or other providers, possibly third parties adding value on data and with a variety of services).

    A paywall for most data would disuade me from most access – I’m not looking at commercial projects.

  • http://twitter.com/smithsam Sam

    I agree with Chris on these points.

  • Philip John

    Completely agree. All data should be under this license. No public information should be available under any other license.

  • http://www.flyingbinary.com Jacqui Taylor

    We would like csv files non chargeable to allow us to produce some Proof of Concept applications which could be done easily and cheaply, keep it simple is important to us.

  • Stephenb

    FTP delivery, optional DVD for a small fee to cover preparation and postage, torrents, HTTP download (sometimes FTP is blocked). Again open standards format preferrable.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/6p00e54f89f38b8833 Jonathan Raper

    I completely agree with this

  • http://www.mouchel.com/engineeringandenvironment/ Mmedo Duffort

    A data portal linking to georferenced (map based) datasets would enable geographical search which would be of most use for those working on discrete projects.

blog comments powered by Disqus