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Effective engagement of local employers

Recruiting and retaining local employers who are willing to take key stage 4 learners on placement can be a challenging task. Nevertheless, Education Business Partnership Organisations up and down the country, support schools in employment engagement and creative, determined individuals have successfully met the challenge of employer involvement at local level in many areas.

 

Transcript

Voiceover: Recruiting and retaining local employers who are willing to take on key stage four learners on placement can be a challenging task. Education Business Partnership Organisations up and down the country support schools in employer engagement. Creative and determined individuals have successfully met the challenge of employer involvement at local level.

Rob Pritchard: The Education Development Service is a training provider dedicated to working with schools and local businesses providing young people with a structured bespoke vocational programme of their choice. Our recruitment team operates across five boroughs and works with hundreds of local employers supporting students on our vocational programmes. We recognise that they are running businesses not charities and so it is important to highlight the advantages of the programme and how it not only benefits the young person but also them as a business too. It's absolutely key that we identify the right working environment for each learner so an interview takes place establishing the learner's needs, requirements and their ideal vocation. The qualifications on offer are generic so we can work in any vocation that the young person so wishes.

Rebecca Knight: Shropshire is the fifth most rural local authority in England and the environment that schools are working in is that they are dealing with a high proportion of small and medium sized companies which also includes a high percentage of self-employed businesses. In reality this means for schools that they have to work hard at building and maintaining relationships with employers.

Georgia Thomlinson: When engaging employers on our work placements schemes you have to have an understanding of their experience of working with students and when I meet them on a one to one basis some employers will say 'Sorry, I'm not going to take a student' and it's a case of understanding why they don’t want to take a student, what happened in the past and to be able to give them information that might help them change their minds.

Andrew Bebb: Tom came to me about almost twelve months ago now and he's since started work experience with me. He's displayed enough to me over the last twelve months that he will go on and become a farmer, farm manager of some sort after he's done his college training. It's certainly encouraged me to take on perhaps another lad next year.

Voiceover: We'd definitely look to taking somebody else on with this programme just because of how well it's gone. It's definitely been a positive thing on both sides.

Voiceover:  Even in difficult economic circumstances we do find that proactive employers still want to get involved in programmes that involve young people because it helps them to plan their skills requirements for the future.

Last modified: 29 Mar 2010