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In this section you will find information on what to do if you have concerns about another person, such as a family member, friend or neighbour, or if you have concerns about how you are being treated.

Concerns about someone who is having difficulties making decisions

If you know a family member, friend, neighbour or anyone who you think is having difficulties in making decisions about their finance and property or their personal welfare, then they may need someone to be appointed to make these decisions on their behalf.

The 'Making decisions for someone else' section of our website provides information on how you, or someone else, can ask the Court of Protection to make decisions on behalf of someone who is having difficulties in making decisions themselves.

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Concerns about abuse

If you know a vulnerable person that you believe is at risk or you feel that you might be being abused then it is very important to let someone know. See our What is abuse? section for information explaining what abuse is and who a vulnerable adult is.

You may be worried that you are wrong or worried about the consequences of reporting it, however it is important that you tell someone what you think is happening.

A vulnerable person being abused may not be able to report the abuse they are experiencing and may rely upon you to voice your concerns and ensure that someone with the necessary experience and responsibility investigates the alleged abuse and takes steps to stop it happening.

If you think someone is being abused please act now - don't assume that someone else will do it.

The What to do if you suspect abuse or fraud section of our website provides information on the different agencies you need to contact if you suspect or know abuse is taking place. It also provides information on the joined-up approach the OPG and Local Authorities have developed for responding to concerns about abuse.

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