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18/01/2011
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Ashley Church of England School, Surrey

An award-winning school that has reduced energy use by 75 per cent in two years.

Children at Ashley School monitor their use of electricity

Children at Ashley School monitor their use of electricity

Under the inspirational leadership of its head teacher, Ashley C of E School has reduced its electricity use by 75 per cent over two years, as well as making other changes to improve its environmental performance.

The school shows how chosing low energy lifestyles is key to reducing energy use. The school measures its energy use and asks pupils to come up with simple, practical ideas for action. Examples of their imaginative responses include reducing the use of photocopied sheets in lessons and preparing cold rather than hot food in the summer.

There are clear targets and rewards for successfully reducing energy use. The school’s 100 club challenges pupils and staff to stay below 100kwh of electricity use per day. If they succeed for a whole week then the pupils are rewarded with £10 for the school council to spend on projects chosen by the pupils.

The school has started to involve people in the wider community, including parents, in its sustainability drive. For example, one third of the families with pupils of the school are now engaged in the school’s Carbon Countdown Challenge and 100 Club, which encourages energy consumption of less than 100 kWh per week in each home.

Ashley C of E School was one of only two schools in England to receive the Ashden Award for Sustainable Energy in 2009.

Read more about Ashley C of E School.

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Tags: energy, buildings and spaces

CABE and Urban Practitioners
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