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Summarising and mapping information

Pulling together the most relevant information for the spatial strategy and using compelling techniques to present this to stakeholders.

Californication

Californication
© Zandbelt & vanderBerg 2008

Summarising and mapping the relevant data early on will help to detect possible conflicts and synergies. This is normally done when preparing for the first major design workshop.

As well as pulling out the data, this task includes thinking about how best to present the information you select as being most important. Using creative and visually expressive techniques will help to:

  • make the data easy to comprehend, especially for non-professional audiences
  • synthesise data and to detect the most relevant issues
  • communicate and promote the strategy and key issues.

How to summarise and map information

  1. Select relevant data
    To avoid data overload you should focus on the most relevant information.
  2. Use GIS where possible
    To analyse the data and start developing spatial options, all data that can be geographically/spatially referenced should be mapped using geographic information systems (GIS).
  3. Present data clearly
    When mapping and presenting the data, use creative and visually expressive, captivating techniques so that people can understand the data.

Examples of summarising and mapping information