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07/01/2011
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Trinity Watch

Design and construction

Great care has been taken with the detail of the construction. Turned granite columns and oak beams are used for porches, all buildings rise from a stone plinth with a slate coping, local reclaimed slates are used on the roofs, the walls are of cavity masonry construction faced with coloured render, slates or Cornish Callywith stone. All these features add to the variety of the building forms.

Internally, spaces are planned so that the rooms work for different uses. Lower level rooms double up as guest rooms or home offices and one third floor room, designated as a bedroom, is used as a living room with a fine sea view. The generous storage and circulation spaces allow other as well - in one house a desk and computer occupies the landing.

Gas fired boilers heat the homes via underfloor pipes, giving an even heat and freeing wall space from radiators. Each living room has a wood fired stove and the chimneys for these form an important feature, especially when seen against the skyline from St Ives harbour.

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Key information

Location

St Ives

Region

South West

Award

2009 winner