This snapshot, taken on
07/01/2011
, shows web content acquired for preservation by The National Archives. External links, forms and search may not work in archived websites and contact details are likely to be out of date.
 
 
The UK Government Web Archive does not use cookies but some may be left in your browser from archived websites.

Icon - Lime Tree Square

Streets, parking and pedestrianisation

The central square in Icon - Lime Tree Square is a place for meeting, playing, sitting and picnicking, creating an important social space. All the public spaces are overlooked by housing, which means that children can play outside more safely.

Shared space and home zone principles underpin the scheme’s broader design philosophy, with pedestrians given priority over cars. There is plenty of car parking on the street, in garages and car ports, and on the central spine route through the site.

Rather than taking the traditional approach to highway approval, the highway authority joined the development team for a series of monthly workshops so that all aspects of highway design could be worked through properly. The network of street types which had been put forward by the design team, for instance, was tested in detail. Its grid pattern, with a strong frontage of terraced units proposed a tight street framework, so they looked at street use by pedestrians and cyclists, and tracked vehicles. Areas of concern such as visibility were resolved through the design development process or by identifying mitigation measures should they be needed.

The scheme relied on a strong landscaping strategy to reinforce the concept of shared space. Traditionally the highway authority would have included strategic planting as part of the highway adoption with a commuted sum. However, the success of the development depended on streets being maintained to a higher standard, and so it was agreed that a management company supported by Clarks would take on the responsibility under licence for the maintenance of planting and street furniture.

As a result of this closely coordinated approach, pedestrians and cyclists are accommodated throughout the site with cars adapting to this priority. Routes are also provided through and across the site with connections to existing cycle routes.

Related case studies

Trinity Watch. Photo by Cameracraft.

Trinity Watch

An edge of town development which exploits a sloping site to give spectacular views of the sea and the harbour of St Ives.

Norfolk Park Green Homes

Norfolk Park Green Homes

Fondly known locally as ‘Ballamory’ after the BBC children’s television programme, this housing scheme has raised people’s aspirations for their part of the city.

Key information

Location

Street, Somerset

Region

South West

Award

2009 winner