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Stowaways caught in Birminham-bound lorry


31 March 2011

Eight Eritrean nationals, hiding in a lorry headed for Birmingham, have been prevented from entering the country after being caught at Calais.

At 3.35am on the 18 March UK Border Agency officers at the French port examined an Italian registered freight vehicle with a Bulgarian driver.

A sniffer dog called Tom, a springer spaniel, alerted his handlers to the presence of some unexpected passengers in the back of the lorry.

Officers then boarded the trailer and found four men and four women hiding among the load of rear car window screens which was en route to Birmingham.

The stowaways were removed from the lorry before being handed over to the French Frontier Police.

The vehicle was allowed to continue its journey to the UK but both the driver and haulage company may each now be liable for a fine of up to £2,000 per stowaway if they are unable to prove they took steps to secure the vehicle.

Carole Upshall, UK Border Agency director for South and Europe, said:

'We have to stay one step ahead of illegal immigration. Having UK Border Agency officers based in France and Belgium means we can check vehicles before they cross the channel and stop would-be illegal immigrants setting foot in the UK.

'Increasingly sophisticated and dangerous attempts are being made to try to smuggle people into Britain so our officers use hi-tech equipment, such as heartbeat detectors and carbon dioxide probes, as well as sniffer dogs, to find people hiding in vehicles.

'Our strong presence at the border is preventing illegal immigrants from entering the UK and then heading for places like, in this case, Birmingham.'