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20/01/2011
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You can access information about our policies by A to Z, by policy theme or by viewing the most recently updated pages.



Economics and statistics

  • Economic Development

    23 Nov 2010

    Following the General Election, the Government is committed to building a new economic model. This includes the creation of Local Enterprise Partnerships - joint local authority-business bodies brought forward by local authorities themselves to promote local economic development - to replace Regional Development Agencies. In taking this work forward the Government wishes to ensure an orderly transition which maintains focus on delivery. Detailed proposals will follow in due course.

  • Economics and social research

    2 Dec 2010

    Main areas of economics and social research undertaken by the Department.

  • Economics Papers series

    13 Dec 2010

    BIS places analysis at the heart of policy-making. Its analysis and evidence base is made publicly available through a series of Economics Papers that set out the thinking underpinning policy development.

  • Economics, statistics and analysis

    1 Sep 2010

    The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) places statistics and analysis at the heart of policy-making. Economics plays a key role in policymaking in the Department. Economists advise on a range of policy issues, from productivity and competitiveness through to regional development and evaluation.

  • Evaluation of BIS's activities

    27 Aug 2010

    The Department's evaluation programme is co-ordinated by the Regulation, Appraisal and Evaluation Team, which helps ensure that robust evidence is gathered to measure the effects of the department's activities.


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