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Report of the The Bloody Sunday Inquiry
- Volume VI - Chapter 102



Civilian evidence of soldiers firing in Glenfada Park North

Chapter 102: Civilian evidence of soldiers firing in Glenfada Park North

Contents

Paragraph

Soldiers firing from the hip 102.3

Soldiers firing from the centre of Glenfada Park North 102.19

Soldiers firing towards the south-eastern corner of Glenfada Park North 102.32

Other civilian evidence of soldiers firing in Glenfada Park North 102.44

102.1 We turn now to examine the evidence given by civilians who believed that they witnessed soldiers firing in Glenfada Park North. In this part of the report we consider only those who gave accounts that suggested that they saw specific soldiers fire, and even then we are mindful of the possibility that they were mistaken. In the course of the Inquiry we have come across many examples of witnesses who, despite their best intentions, made a false assumption that a soldier that they were watching must have fired a shot that they heard.

102.2 We consider first the evidence of those civilians who thought that a soldier or soldiers fired from the hip from the north-eastern corner of Glenfada Park North. We then examine the accounts of witnesses who recalled soldiers firing from the centre of the car park, before looking at the evidence of shots that were fired towards the south-eastern corner of the complex and other miscellaneous evidence regarding the soldiers who fired in Glenfada Park. As is discussed above,1 the cumulative evidence of those members of Anti-Tank Platoon who acknowledged firing shots in Sector 4 was to the effect that four soldiers fired a total of ten rounds in the initial burst of gunfire. All of the shots came from somewhere in the north-eastern quadrant of the courtyard, with eight directed towards the south-west corner and two towards the south-east corner.

1 Chapters 99 and 100

Soldiers firing from the hip

102.3 A number of witnesses have given evidence that one or more of the soldiers who fired on entering Glenfada Park North did so from the hip or in a manner other than raising the weapon to the shoulder. It was contrary to the Yellow Card1 to fire other than aimed shots; and aimed shots cannot be fired otherwise than from the shoulder.

1 The instructions to soldiers on when they could use their weapons, discussed elsewhere in this report (paragraphs 8.121–123).

102.4 Joe Friel was shot across the chest as he ran through Glenfada Park North; he stumbled but was able, with assistance, to make it through the Abbey Park alleyway. We consider his evidence in detail later in this report,1 when we discuss the circumstances of his wounding. His evidence was that he believed that he was shot by a soldier who was holding his rifle between his hip and his shoulder.

1 Paragraphs 104.6–36

102.5 Gregory Wild, whose shout had alerted Joe Friel to the presence of soldiers in Glenfada Park North, also gave an account in 1972 that suggests that a soldier fired from the hip. In a written statement he recorded that the first soldier he saw in Glenfada Park North was standing close to an opening that led to Rossville Street with his gun at hip level, the gun apparently resting on a small wall. Gregory Wild stated that after shouting his warning he was looking towards the soldier and I saw a flash and heard a shot ”. Shortly after this he heard Joe Friel shout that he had been shot.1

1 AW15.4

102.6 Gregory Wild also gave an interview to the Sunday Times Insight Team, in which he stated that he was aware of two shots fired shortly before Joe Friel was hit: “… i was certain that they came from the soldier I was looking at. he had fired from the hip. it was definitely not an aimed shot. 1 A map prepared in conjunction with the interview shows the soldier in the north-east corner of the car park.2

1 AW15.1

2 AW15.3

102.7 In his written evidence to this Inquiry, Gregory Wild recorded that he saw a soldier in the north-east corner of Glenfada Park holding a self-loading rifle (SLR) with the butt against his hip and the barrel leaning against the wall of the wheelchair ramp in front of him. He stated that the soldiers fired two or three shots without aiming.1

1 AW15.7; AW15.11

102.8 Joe Mahon was shot in the hip as he ran across Glenfada Park North. He fell on the pavement in the centre of the southern side of the complex, next to the fatally wounded William McKinney. He told this Inquiry that before he was shot and as he was running towards the Abbey Park alleyway, he saw a group of four or five soldiers coming into Glenfada Park North from the north-eastern entrance, one of whom fired a number of shots from the hip in a fan ”.1 Later in this report2 we consider the evidence of Joe Mahon in detail, where we give reasons for our view that some at least of his evidence is unreliable.

1 AM18.2-3; Day 167/20; Day 167/18-22; AM18.2-3 2Paragraphs 104.399–409, 104.481–2 and 104.488–492

102.9 Joseph Donnelly, the man who ended up carrying Michael Kelly from Glenfada Park after others had fled, told this Inquiry that he saw three soldiers enter the complex through the north-east corner. He saw one of the soldiers drop to his knee and assume a firing position. The other two soldiers held their rifles at waist height. He believed that all three fired. He explained in his oral evidence that this belief was based on hearing the sound of shots come from all three soldiers rather than seeing any recoil from the rifles. Joseph Donnelly told us that, as he ran, he saw bullets hit the wooden fence to his left, and that he was confident that the soldiers were aiming at the crowd carrying Michael Kelly. He did not see any civilian casualties at that stage or see the soldiers advancing as they fired.1 In his NICRA statement Joseph Donnelly referred to soldiers firing as he ran from Glenfada Park with Michael Kelly, but gave no further detail.2

1 AD124.4; Day 128/99-101; Day 128/130

2 AD124.1

102.10 Charlie McLaughlin was one of the group who, initially, helped to carry Michael Kelly across Glenfada Park. In his NICRA statement he recalled seeing two soldiers entering the north-east corner of the complex as he carried Michael Kelly. One fired from the hip, and Charlie McLaughlin heard bullets striking the wooden fence on the southern side of the courtyard before he ran out through the alleyway and towards Blucher Street. He gave a similar account of the soldier shooting from the hip in his evidence to this Inquiry, but he also recalled that the other soldier fired aimed shots from the shoulder as he walked forward. Charlie McLaughlin was confident that these soldiers were firing because of the number of shots fired at a time when they were the only soldiers in Glenfada Park North.1

1 AM321.8; AM321.4; Day 177/87-89

102.11 Patrick Moyne and Pearse McCaul were two of those who helped to carry Michael Kelly across Glenfada Park North. Patrick Moyne told this Inquiry that he saw soldiers running into Glenfada Park North with rifles at the hip ”.1 Pearse McCaul2 told this Inquiry that he saw two soldiers come into Glenfada Park North from the north-eastern entrance, one holding his rifle at his chest in a very casual fashion ”, and the other with his rifle higher up ”. However, neither of these men described seeing these soldiers fire and in our view, their evidence does not assist in assessing the matter under discussion.

1 AM444.5; Day 162/19-26

2 AM93.3-4; Day 164/91-95

102.12 Paul Coyle was one of those who ran from the southern end of the eastern block to the south-western exit. According to his account, as he ran he saw two soldiers entering the courtyard through the north-east corner. These soldiers opened fire from the hip towards the fleeing crowd. They were standing side by side and gave no warning. He thought that he heard 10–20 shots fired in rapid succession as he ran across the courtyard.1 His evidence to us is consistent with what he told Praxis Films Ltd,2 but he does not appear to have given an account in 1972.

1 AC105.3; Day 152/73-77

2 O5.9-10; O5.17-22

102.13 Benn Keaveney identified himself as one of those in the group at the southern end of the eastern block around Michael Kelly.1 He told us that he saw two soldiers entering the north-east corner of Glenfada Park when he was at the south-west corner, and that he saw one soldier fire from the knee with a weapon held to his chest. He thought, but could not be sure, that the weapon was a Sten gun. The other soldier fired while standing, but seemed to discharge his round before bringing his gun up to his shoulder . Benn Keaveney’s evidence suggests that he saw Michael Quinn shot, to the right side of him. Then, as he started to run, Benn Keaveney was temporarily blinded by pieces of brick and masonry dislodged by a bullet that struck a nearby wall. According to his account, he subsequently heard another bullet strike a wooden fence on the east face of the western block of Glenfada Park North.2

1 AK2.14

2 AK2.8-9; AK2.24; Day 160/13-27

102.14 In our view, Benn Keaveney was wrong in identifying the weapon held by the soldier as a Sten gun. However, he stated that he was not sure of his evidence on this point, and in our view this identification does not invalidate his wider testimony.

102.15 Don Boyle stated to this Inquiry that while he was still on the eastern side of the courtyard he saw about four to six soldiers enter the courtyard to the north of him. He had the impression that they were all firing, and recalled that one was on one knee and another held his rifle at his hip. Don Boyle stated that he did not see any of the soldiers pull the trigger and he did not see any bullet strikes, but he was sure they were shooting ”.1Through ill health Don Boyle was unable to give oral evidence to this Inquiry.

1 AB47.2

102.16 OIRA 1’s evidence to this Inquiry was that as he ran across Glenfada Park he had the impression that the soldier he could see in the north-east corner was firing high velocity rounds from the hip. However, he could not be sure that he saw this soldier actually firing.1In his note of an interview with this witness, John Barry of the Sunday Times Insight Team recorded, in our view correctly, that OIRA 1 said he heard the first burst of firing as he got into the Abbey Park alleyway , and that he saw two soldiers as he ran, one each at the north-east and north-west entrances. OIRA 1 is also recorded as saying that the former was armed with a Sterling sub-machine gun.2We are not persuaded that OIRA 1 actually saw, as opposed to heard, soldiers firing.

1 AOIRA1.30; Day 395/99-101; Day 395/120-121

2 AOIRA1.2

102.17 Private G stated that he fired from a kneeling position.1Joseph Donnelly, Don Boyle and James McNulty gave an account of a soldier kneeling, which may therefore indicate (if Private G is to be believed on this point) that it was not Private G who, at this stage at least, fired from the hip. None of the soldiers who have stated that they fired in Glenfada Park has given evidence of having done so from the hip. Lance Corporal F and Private H, who gave oral evidence to this Inquiry, denied that they had fired in this manner or that they had seen anyone else doing so.2 Corporal E and Private G, as noted above, are dead and gave no evidence to this Inquiry. They were not asked directly at the Widgery Inquiry whether they fired from the hip, but their claim that they fired aimed shots3 would seem to amount to a denial that they had fired from the hip. However, for reasons that appear in the course of this report, it is necessary to view with great caution the evidence given by these soldiers.

1 B186; WT14.79

2 Day 375/109; Day 376/153-154; Day 378/13;
Day 377/90-91

3 B95; WT14.32; B186; WT14.79

102.18 Our assessment of the evidence relating to the question under consideration leads us to conclude that, despite our concerns about specific aspects of some of the civilian accounts considered above, it is probable that at least one of the soldiers did fire his rifle from the hip, in contravention of the provisions of the Yellow Card.

Soldiers firing from the centre of Glenfada Park North

102.19 Some civilian witnesses have given accounts of soldiers entering Glenfada Park North, advancing to the centre of the car park and then firing from there. This contrasts with the evidence given by Corporal E, Lance Corporal F and Privates G and H, which is supported by the majority of the civilian testimony, that their initial shots were all fired from positions close to the north-eastern corner of the complex. However, for the sake of completeness, we turn to consider the accounts suggesting that the soldiers advanced well into Glenfada Park North before opening fire.

102.20 Donncha MacFicheallaigh stated to this Inquiry that as he walked towards the south-west exit of Glenfada Park North he heard someone shout that “the Brits” were entering the area. He said that he turned and saw two soldiers entering through the north-eastern corner. There were one or two cars parked in that area and the soldiers moved to the right (ie to the west) and came out from behind the cars before advancing “at pace” to within 12 yards of the running crowd. He told us he had a “firm memory” of seeing both soldiers firing from the hip towards the south of the courtyard in the direction of the person who had shouted the warning. There were at least three people standing in front of the fences of the southern block, who appeared to be petrified as the paras came in and began running parallel to the fence towards the south western exit . He heard two or three shots and saw one of these men fall as if he had been shot in the leg. Donncha MacFicheallaigh said he turned to run through the packed entrance to the Abbey Park alleyway, and as he did so he heard more shots and saw someone who he came to believe was Jim Wray fall behind him. Once he was in the alleyway he looked round and saw two more soldiers entering the north-eastern corner of Glenfada Park. He took cover at the side wall of the gardens of the southern block of Glenfada Park North, and while he was there he saw the man beside him, on his left, who he later learned was Michael Quinn, take two steps away from the wall towards Abbey Park, at which moment he was shot in the face.1

1 AM7.9-10; Day 409/104-116; Day 409/165; Day 409/175-184

102.21 Donncha MacFicheallaigh gave an interview to the journalist Peter Taylor in 1991 in which he stated that “two to three Brits came in the opening where we had just come through and just as we looked around they started firing, spraying the square.1 In a later interview with Channel 4 in or around 1997 he mentioned that the first soldier he saw in Glenfada Park was firing from the hip.2

1 I102; Day 409/179

2 AM7.15; Day 409/163

102.22 John Shiels told this Inquiry that from a position in a first floor flat in the eastern block of Glenfada Park North he saw a soldier shoot a man who was running across the car park towards the south-western corner of the complex. There were already two bodies in the car park at this time. He stated that the soldier was standing in the centre of the northern end of the courtyard, and that he fired one shot from the shoulder.1

1 AS19.10-11; Day 149/108-111; Day 149/133-137; AS19.18

102.23 In his Keville interview John Shiels stated that he saw a man run across the courtyard of the flats and a paratrooper come from behind a wall ... came out shooting and the man fell…1Although John Shiels may have seen someone shot, we are not persuaded that his accounts indicate that the soldier who fired had advanced to the centre of Glenfada Park North, as opposed to the centre of the northern side of that courtyard.

1 AS19.19

102.24 George Hillen, in his written evidence to this Inquiry, stated that immediately before he heard Jim Wray shout that he had been shot, he saw a soldier standing just inside the car parked close to the north-east entrance (“parked ” would appear to be a typographical error for “park”). The soldier was standing still when I looked at him but I saw him lift his rifle up to his shoulder and take aim in our direction. 1 He stated that he could not say definitely that the soldier he saw was the one who shot Jim Wray, as he did not see him shoot, but he did not think that there were any other soldiers around at the time. He marked the position of the soldier on a map, which we show below, with the letter K.2

1 AH74.4 2AH74.19

102.25 In his oral evidence, however, George Hillen told us that the soldier had come a fair way into the courtyard and indicated that he was about in the centre.1 He marked two possible positions of the soldier on a photograph, which we show below.

1 Day 164/38-42

102.26 In view of this inconsistency between his written and oral evidence, we have concluded that it would be unwise to rely on George Hillen’s recollection as to where the soldier he said he saw was standing.

102.27 Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill stated to this Inquiry that she had a vague recollection of seeing a soldier who was firing while on one knee, without aiming, from the centre of the car park.1 She believed that she saw this soldier as she ran towards 59 Glenfada Park (the house at the western end of the southern block of Glenfada Park North) where she and her friends took cover. The notes of an interview that Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill gave in the early 1990s to Praxis recorded that this soldier was standing in the far corner (where the IRA car is marked on the maps) .2 Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill told us that she could not recall the interview or this detail regarding the position of the soldier.3 In view of this inconsistency in her accounts and, as she herself said, the fact that her account was based on a vague recollection, we place no reliance on it.

1 M60.15

2 M60.14

3 M60.2-3; Day 173/9-14; M60.15; M60.14

102.28 John O’Kane, some of whose evidence we have discussed above,1stated to this Inquiry that as he fled into the alleyway leading to Abbey Park he saw three soldiers entering Glenfada Park North, two from the north-east and one from the north-west. He recalled that they advanced towards the fleeing crowd, with their rifles to their shoulders. John O’Kane was aware of bullets flying past and hitting the houses on the southern side of Glenfada Park North, but it is unclear whether he actually saw specific soldiers firing.2John O’Kane made no specific reference to seeing soldiers firing in Glenfada Park in his 1972 evidence.3Since the evidence as a whole persuades us that soldiers did not enter Glenfada Park North from the north-west alleyway before the casualties in Sector 4 were sustained, it seems to us that in this respect John O’Kane’s memory is at fault.

1 Paragraphs 101.23–25

2 Day 163/17-18; AO48.3

3 AO48.24; AO48.40

102.29 Mary Lewis told NICRA that from the terrace of her house on the western side of Glenfada Park North she saw two youths fall, apparently having been shot by soldiers who were in the middle of the courtyard ”.1 This statement is the only evidence that we have from Mary Lewis.

1 AL10.1

102.30 Three witnesses, Frankie Mellon, Michael McCusker and John Anthony McDermott (known as Sean McDermott), who were at the southern end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats, have given evidence of seeing a soldier or soldiers firing inside Glenfada Park North after soldiers had advanced to the southern end of the eastern block of Glenfada Park North. Such was the sight-line of these witnesses that, if their evidence is accurate, the soldier or soldiers must have fired from somewhere in the southern half of Glenfada Park North. However, for reasons that we give later in this report,1 we have concluded that we should place no reliance on this part of their evidence.

1 Paragraphs 109.22–27

102.31 In our view the evidence as a whole shows that the initial firing by the soldiers who entered Glenfada Park North from the north-east corner was from the area of that corner. We accordingly are not persuaded by the accounts of witnesses that suggest that soldiers advanced further into Glenfada Park North before opening fire. However, it is possible that what these witnesses (or some of them) saw was not the initial firing by the soldiers, but subsequent firing, which we consider later in this report.1

1 Chapter 119

Soldiers firing towards the south-eastern corner of Glenfada Park North

102.32 We have heard evidence from several civilians regarding shots that were fired into the south-eastern corner of Glenfada Park North. In general, these accounts tend to suggest that a small number of rounds were fired in this direction. The only soldier to have stated that he fired in this direction was Corporal E, who claimed to have fired two rounds at a nail and petrol bomber.

102.33 Patrick O’Donnell was wounded as he crouched behind a fence at the southern end of the south-western side of the eastern block of Glenfada Park North, as is shown on the map below.

102.34 We consider his evidence in detail later in this report.1 In essence, he was unable to identify the soldier who shot him, though he has given an account of seeing at least two soldiers in the north-east quadrant of the courtyard shortly before he was hit. Patrick O’Donnell said that he had also seen a civilian fall on the south-western side of Glenfada Park North, which caused him to take cover on the eastern side, but it is not clear from his accounts how many shots were fired in his direction. One round certainly hit Patrick O’Donnell’s shoulder, and this shot might also have struck the wall behind him. However, it is also possible that there was a second or even a third bullet.

1 Paragraphs 104.499–511

102.35 Gerry McLaughlin told this Inquiry that he and his friend Danny McCloskey were standing beside a fence on the eastern side of Glenfada Park North when Gerry McLaughlin saw a soldier entering the complex through the north-east corner, carrying a sub-machine gun. This soldier called out in the direction of Rossville Street, ‘Here the bastards are, Sarge’ , and Gerry McLaughlin decided then to run, as did Danny McCloskey, towards the east entrance to Glenfada Park South. Gerry McLaughlin said that as he ran he looked over his shoulder and caught a fleeting glimpse of about four soldiers entering the park. He then heard shots that he was confident were aimed at him and Danny McCloskey. He recalled a large number of people fleeing through the same entrance to Glenfada Park South, while others ran towards the south-west corner of Glenfada Park North. Just as he went into the alleyway leading to Glenfada Park South he heard someone shout from a position to the west that he had been hit.1

1 AM332.9; Day 162/120-129; AM332.17

102.36 We consider that Gerry McLaughlin was wrong in identifying the weapon held by the soldier as a sub-machine gun. Further, we are not persuaded by this evidence that the shots described by Gerry McLaughlin were in fact aimed at him and Danny McCloskey (who gave no evidence to this Inquiry), since he did not see the soldiers actually firing, nor anything else that could back up his belief. However, it may be the case that he heard shots that were fired in the direction of the south-east corner of Glenfada Park North.

102.37 Dennis Patrick Irwin stated to this Inquiry that, as he ran from the southern end of the eastern block of Glenfada Park North towards Glenfada Park South, he had a very quick glimpse” behind him. He saw about four soldiers entering through the north-east corner of the car park in pairs. The first two soldiers (including one who he thought was a Sergeant as he was “shouting orders”) dropped to their knees, raised their rifles and fired in his direction. He felt one bullet graze his hair and saw others hitting the wall at the northern gable of the eastern block of Glenfada Park South.1

1 AI3.3; Day 170/84-88

102.38 Dennis Patrick Irwin made a brief NICRA statement that made no mention of firing in Glenfada Park North. He did refer to bullets “bouncing off the wall of the corner of the flats ”, but the context of the account suggests to us that this was a reference to the east corner of the southern end of the eastern block of Glenfada Park North. Dennis Patrick Irwin told NICRA that he watched some of the events at the rubble barricade from close to this position, and there is a body of other evidence considered elsewhere in this report1 of a bullet or bullets striking the eastern corner of this wall.2

1 Chapter 88 2AI3.8

102.39 In our view it would be unwise to rely upon the account given to us by Dennis Patrick Irwin as showing that bullets were fired in his direction as he ran into Glenfada Park South. It seems to us that his memory has played him tricks, and that in truth what he witnessed was some of the firing in Rossville Street. Had he in fact had a bullet graze him, it seems to us that this is something he would have mentioned when he gave his NICRA statement.

102.40 James McNulty was one of the civilians who began to run towards the south-west corner of Glenfada Park from the gable end, but turned back after seeing civilians fall in front of him. He stated to this Inquiry that as he ran out he glanced to his right and saw a soldier on one knee in the north-east corner of Glenfada Park, with his rifle pointing towards the southern end of the park. James McNulty stated that he only looked briefly in this direction, but he could also see two or three other soldiers in a similar location. He ran back to the southern end of the eastern block, from where he saw bullets ricocheting off the northern end or pram-ramp of the eastern block of Glenfada Park South.1

1 AM377.2-3; Day 152/8-13

102.41 In his 1972 evidence, James McNulty did not mention seeing this incident.1 It is unclear to us from his evidence as a whole whether what he told us he recalled seeing was the result of firing by soldiers in Glenfada Park North or those in Rossville Street.

1 AM377.10; AM377.11; AM377.13-AM377.15

102.42 John Leo Clifford gave written evidence to this Inquiry in which he stated that he was outside a house on the eastern side of Glenfada Park South when a bullet passed by him; he thought the round had been fired by soldiers in Glenfada Park North.1 He was too unwell to give oral evidence to us. As we observe elsewhere in this report,2 although his account is evidence of the firing of a shot that went into Glenfada Park South, it remains unclear at what stage and from where it was fired.

1 AC66.1; AC66.7 2Paragraph 109.25

102.43 Charles Coyle, whose evidence about being fired at as he ran across the alleyway between Glenfada Park North and Columbcille Court is discussed earlier,1 told this Inquiry that he was shot at again as he ran from Glenfada Park North to Glenfada Park South. He said that he heard three shots pass by “very close indeed ” as he ran into Glenfada Park South through the north-eastern entrance. He could not tell whether those shots had come from Glenfada Park North or from the direction of Rossville Street.2

1 Paragraphs 94.10–16 and 94.25–30 2AC88.5; Day 146/171-172

Other civilian evidence of soldiers firing in Glenfada Park North

102.44 Two civilian witnesses have given evidence of seeing soldiers taking up positions behind a red van after they entered Glenfada Park North. William Kelly was in 59 Glenfada Park, on the south-western side of the northern block of Glenfada Park South. Although he did not actually record seeing soldiers firing, he did state in his short NICRA account that he saw soldiers behind a red van.1In his NICRA statement, William Ward also referred to soldiers behind a red van. There were, he said, three and they said nothing and opened fire ”. It appears from this statement that this occurred as Michael Kelly was being carried across Glenfada Park North.2

1 AK29.1

2 AW9.1

102.45 Another witness, Ann Gallagher, also referred to a soldier firing from a position behind a vehicle. She was in her aunt’s flat, 8 Garvan Place in Block 1 of the Rossville Flats, during the main events of Bloody Sunday. In her NICRA statement she recorded that:1

“When the crowd dispersed [from the rubble barricade] the soldiers moved up Rossville Street and they moved in behind the park at the villas. One soldier stood at a car facing the fellows they had their backs to him and he opened up at the three of them. There was a man standing up there and he was shot in the leg. They must have killed him because the blood was flowing out of him. ”

1 AG1.6

102.46 Ann Gallagher’s account implies that she saw three men shot by a soldier who was at a car in Glenfada Park. However, in our view it is unlikely that from her aunt’s flat she could have seen more than the very southern end of the courtyard. A photograph (reproduced below) taken from a nearby flat, 12 Garvan Place, shows that there was no sight-line over the eastern block of Glenfada Park North and into the courtyard.1Ann Gallagher may have been one floor further up, but to our minds there is still little chance that she could have seen into the north-eastern corner of the car park, from where many witnesses recall a soldier or soldiers firing.

1 GEN3.12

102.47 In her evidence to this Inquiry, Ann Gallagher stated that she could no longer recall seeing a soldier fire from beside a vehicle, and she did not recall seeing men fall in Glenfada Park.1She did recall seeing a soldier at the southern end of Glenfada Park North firing, but she believed (in our view mistakenly) that he shot the casualties who fell at the rubble barricade.2

1 AG1.4; Day 401/17-18 2AG1.2

102.48 Ann Gallagher’s aunt, Eileen Gallagher, was also in the flat. She gave a NICRA statement, but did not mention seeing any men fall in Glenfada Park.1

1 AG10.1-5

102.49 In these circumstances we have concluded that we should place no reliance on Ann Gallagher’s account of seeing men shot in Glenfada Park North.