This snapshot, taken on
01/10/2010
, shows web content acquired for preservation by The National Archives. External links, forms and search may not work in archived websites and contact details are likely to be out of date.
 
 
The UK Government Web Archive does not use cookies but some may be left in your browser from archived websites.

Before the Easter weekend we’re looking at the tipping habits of those in the East of England. Compared to any other region in the UK, those in the East of England are the most likely to leave a tip everytime they go out (38% compared to the overall figure of 33%). They are the most likely to tip in cafes and restaurants (96% compared to 91%) and, alongside those in the North East, hotels (24% compared to 22%).

They appreciate clear information when it comes to tipping as they are most likely to go back to a business again if the business provides information about their tipping policy (71% compared to 66% nationally).

If you’re out and about this weekend make sure that you ask, “Who Gets The Tip?”.

Giving a tip depending on the service given is not that common among the wider population but is quite common in the East Midlands, where they are most swayed by the service given (40% compared to the national figure of 33%).

Interestingly, In the West Midlands consumers are the least likely to tip in cafes and restaurants (83% compared to 91% nationally) alongside those in the North East and in hotels (16% compared to 22% nationally) but are the most likely to tip the paper boy (4% compared to 1%).

Unclear tipping policies are a common problem that irritates consumers in both the North East and North West of England. Similar to counterparts in the North East, those in the North West are the least likely in the UK to have seen any information displayed about tipping policies with 73% missing this information when they go out.

Looking at Yorkshire and Humberside, restaurant-goers in these areas are the most likely to ask the question “Who Gets the Tip?” (25% compared to 21% nationally), alongside the South West and are the most likely to expect it to go to staff and not business owners (98% compared to 95%). Also, alongside those in the South East , those in Yorkshire and Humberside are the most likely to go back to a business again if they know the business lets the staff keep the majority of their tips (79% compared to 73%) highlighting the business benefits for businesses who are clearer about their tipping policies.

Are you going out this weekend? If you’re based in the North East you’re probably more likely to tip the driver of your taxi than anywhere else. Those in the North East are the most likely to tip in taxis (48% compared to 36% nationally)

However those in the North East of England are the least likely to ask the question “Who Gets the Tip?” with 13% saying they would compared to 21% nationwide. This might be because those in the North East are the most likely to feel uncomfortable asking the question about tipping
policies (52% compared to 39% nationwide)

As a result those in the North East are the most likely to not know where their money goes when they leave a tip (79% compared to 61% nationwide).

If you’re out and about this weekend – make sure you’re asking, ‘Who Get’s The Tip’

After looking at the Scots and the Welsh, today the Who gets the tip team are looking at attitudes to tipping in Northern Ireland.

Compared to the rest of the UK, the Northern Irish are the most likely to tip in cafes or restaurants (96% compared to the UK average of 91%) and hotels (37% compared to 22%). They are also the most likely to expect the money they leave as tips to go to staff at business owners, indeed as many as 99% say they would expect this to be normal.

In spite of this expectation though, the Northern Irish are by far the least likely to ask the question: ‘who gets the tip?’. Just over one in ten say they would ask a business about their tipping policy compared to the national average of 21%.

When information about tipping is clearly displayed, however, and when a business is clear that its staff keep the majority of the tips, out of all the countries in the UK, the Northern Irish are the most likely to go back to a business.

Following on from yesterday’s look at Wales, the Who gets the tip team today turn their attention to Scottish attitudes to tipping.

Flying in the face of the somewhat unfair stereotype of the Scots as being more careful with their money, the research actually shows that, out of all UK adults, Scots are the most likely to tip all of the time – 45% say they would always leave a tip compared to the national average of 30%. Scots are also the most likely to leave a tip in a hairdressers or beauty establishment, taxi or casino.

In spite of this generosity, though, Scottish people are also the least likely to know where their money goes when they leave a tip, three in four Scots say they don’t know where exactly their money goes compared to the UK average of  61%.

Scots are also the least likely to have seen any information displayed explaining a business’ tipping policy, nearly eight in ten say they have never seen any indication of where their money goes to compared to the UK average of 67%.

Perhaps worryingly, tied to this lack of information or awareness about tipping policies, Scots say that are also by the most uncomfortable country in the UK when it comes to asking the question ‘who gets the tip?’.

Before launching the Who gets the tip campaign, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills conducted some nationwide research, asking UK adults about their attitudes to tipping and businesses’ tipping policies. All of this week, we are going to be looking at different regions of the UK in detail, starting with Wales, trying to understand what makes us all tick when it comes to tips.

The research revealed that the Welsh are the most likely group of people in the UK to leave a tip.

More than nine in ten said they would be likely to leave a tip compared to the national average of 79%. The Welsh are also the most swayed by the service given (44% compared to the national average of 33%), however this willingness appears to be particular to certain types of business as the Welsh are also the least likely to tip in hairdressers or beauty establishments, , taxis, hotels and casinos.

Rewarding staff is clearly important to Welsh customers however as, compared to the national average (73%), the Welsh are also 12% more likely to return to a business that lets staff keep the majority of their tips.

The Welsh are also the least concerned about asking the question outright, ‘who gets the tip?’.

Following the English (22%) the Welsh are the second most likely UK country to ask a business about its tipping policy (18%), interestingly however, the Welsh are the least uncomfortable with asking the question with just 32% saying they would feel awkward doing so compared to 38% in England, 39% in Northern Ireland and 54% in Scotland.

Most of us are familiar with the concept of tipping for good service but few of us are aware of where the practice originated and how it has developed over time.

Did you know, for instance, that in the 18th century the phrase ‘tip me’ was commonly used in English to mean ‘give me’, or that Elvis Presley was said to be one of the most generous tippers ever, reputedly giving away about 200 cars to waiters, friends and complete strangers?

To learn a little more, the Who gets the tip team have developed a tipping timeline which shows the history and development of tipping, service charges, gratuities and cover charges – from the Romans, through the American Civil War and the swinging ‘60s right up to the present day.

Why not have a look and see how the way we leave tips today has been shaped by the past!

Money Saving Expert, the UK’s largest consumer finance information and discussion website, founded and owned by Martin Lewis, has lent its backing to the Who gets the tip campaign.

Money Saving Expert are supporting the campaign because transparency in tipping is one of its 50 word consumer manifesto ideas, which says: “It must be clear how exactly service charges are distributed to staff, such as whether they go directly to waiters in addition to their wage, or whether they go to the restaurant.”

There is already a healthy debate on the issue on Money Saving Expert’s forums, to view and participate in it you can visit: http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.html?t=2316831

Lord Tony Young, Parliamentary under Secretary of State for Employment Relations and Postal Affairs has lent his backing to the Who gets the tip campaign with an exclusive video interview.

Lord Young kindly made the time to meet the Who gets the tip team in London’s Leicester Square last week and, after a quick cup of coffee, spoke about the Government idea behind the campaign, consultations with different UK businesses and what he hopes the campaign will achieve.

You can view the video here on our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uOeYUgG5Ao

Supporters


A big thank you to everyone who's asking 'Who gets the tip?'