This snapshot, taken on
28/09/2010
, shows web content acquired for preservation by The National Archives. External links, forms and search may not work in archived websites and contact details are likely to be out of date.
 
 
The UK Government Web Archive does not use cookies but some may be left in your browser from archived websites.

Website of the UK government

Please note that this website has a UK government accesskeys system.

Public services all in one place

Main menu

Tuesday, 28 September 2010

Responding to a County Court claim

If someone has issued a claim against you through a county court, it's important to act quickly - you have 14 days from receiving the claim to reply. If you don't respond, or leave it too late, a judgment could be made against you.

If you want to pay the amount in full

If you decide to pay in full, you must:

  • include the court fees, costs and interest (if specified) in your payment
  • send the payment directly to the claimant (at the address shown on the claim form)
  • make sure the claimant receives your payment within 14 days (allowing at least two days for posting)

It's also a good idea to ask for a receipt.

If you pay in full within the deadline you don't need to contact the court or complete any of the forms.

If you can't afford to pay all the amount at once

If you can't afford to pay the money all at once, you can ask for time to pay. You'll need to:

  • fill in the 'Admission Form' N9A
  • specify on the form how you want to pay (by instalments, for example)
  • send the form directly to the claimant (at the address shown on the claim form)
  • make sure the claimant receives your form within 14 days (allowing at least two days for posting)

It's also a good idea to keep a copy for yourself.

If you don't agree with the amount owed

If you do owe some money, but don't agree with the amount claimed, this is known as 'making a part admission'. You should:

  • return the 'Admission Forms' N9A and N9B to the issuing court
  • say on the forms how much you think you owe the claimant and why you don't consider you owe any more than that
  • make sure the court receives the forms within 14 days (allowing at least two days for posting)
  • either pay the amount you think you owe straightaway, or ask for time to pay - either by instalments or by a certain date

If you want to defend against the claim

If you do not agree that you owe the debt, or you have already paid the money, you may want to defend against the claim.

If so you should:

  • return the 'Defence Form' N9B to the issuing court
  • answer all the points raised ('allegations') in the particulars of claim
  • make sure the court receives the form within 14 days (allowing at least two days for posting)

If you need more time to respond

If your defence is complicated and you need more time to respond, you can fill in the 'Acknowledgment of Service Form' N9.

If you file an acknowledgment of service within 14 days, this will allow you an extra 14 days to complete the defence form.

If you want to make a counterclaim

If you think you are owed money by the claimant that could offset some, or all, of the claim, this is know as 'making a counterclaim'.

In this case, you should complete the counterclaim section of the defence form.

Do you have to pay to respond to a claim?

You can respond to a claim with an admission or defence for free. If you include a counterclaim there may be a fee. Court staff will be able to advise you about this.

Help with completing the forms

Staff at your local county court will be able to answer your queries about completing the response forms.

Responding to the claim online

If the person making the claim against you did so using the Money Claim Online internet service, you can choose to respond through the same service. The login details you'll need will be on the claim. The 14 day limit still applies, so it's important to act quickly.

What happens if you ignore the claim?

If you ignore a claim, or miss the deadline, the claimant can request judgment against you without your side being heard. This is known as 'judgment by default'.

This can result in a judgment order demanding that you pay the money in full (plus costs) immediately. Your credit rating may also be affected.

Was this information useful?

Thinking about what you have just read, how useful did you find the information?
Thinking about what you have just read, how useful did you find the information?
500 character limit

Why are we asking for this information?

  • we want to hear what you think about the quality and usefulness of our pages
  • your comments will help us improve our pages
  • your comments will also help with the future development of Directgov
  • telling us what you think will help make sure we give you the very best service

Access keys