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Legal Assistance

Legal Advice for Soldiers in the UK

Soldiers serving in the UK make their own arrangements and will contact a high street solicitor in the same way as any other British citizen.  Solicitors can provide legal advice or representation to soldiers facing a civil prosecution, prosecution before a service court and on any other legal issues.  If soldiers have any issues of this nature they should consider first talking to someone in their own unit such as the unit welfare officer, Padre, adjutant or admin officer.  If a soldier is arrested by the civilian police or could be facing a civil prosecution they must inform their unit chain of command immediately.

A soldier who does not wish to discuss a legal problem with a member of their unit may instead contact the following:

(It should be noted that these organisations can give general advice but do not give specific legal advice).

Advertisements for solicitors can be found in such publications as Soldier magazine or Yellow Pages; alternatively, they can contact the Law Society or visit a solicitors' office.  Soldiers should be aware that the Army does not endorse any firms advertised in military publications and they should make their own choice of solicitor.

Legal Advice to Soldiers serving Abroad

When soldiers and their families are serving overseas it is recognised that it may be difficult to have contact with a solicitor in the UK.  Army Legal Assistance based in Bielefeld, Germany, provide legal assistance worldwide including in operational theatres.  It can be contacted on 0049 521 9254 3196. 

Soldiers facing trial at Court-Martial and the Summary Appeal Court

Soldiers facing trial may be provided with legal representation authorised by the Army Criminal Legal Aid Authority, some or all of which may be at public expense.  Soldiers can receive guidance on this from their unit chain of command.