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Tin


tin Tin is a trace element found in fresh and tinned foods. The amount found in fresh food depends on how much tin there is in the soil where the food is grown.

In some cases, the process of canning also leads to tin being present in tinned food. By law, the maximum amount of tin allowed in tinned foods is 200 mg of tin per kg of food. Normally the tin content is well below this legal safety limit.


How much do I need?

Tin is not thought to be needed for good health.

What does it do?

Although tin is not thought to be needed for good health, it might play a role in some body processes.

What happens if I take too much?

Having very high amounts of tin can cause stomach pain, nausea and diarrhoea.

There isn't enough evidence to know what the effects might be of having high amounts of tin each day for a long time.

What is FSA advice?

It's unlikely that we need tin for good health. But if you decide to take tin supplements it's important not to take too much because this could be harmful.

Having 13 mg or less a day of tin from food and supplements is unlikely to cause any harm.