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Page Summary

How to challenge a decision or proposal made by the CAA

Main Content

Where a CAA official has advised you of a refusal to issue or a proposal to vary, suspend or revoke -

  • an aerodrome licence;
  • an air operator’s certificate;
  • an air traffic controller’s licence;
  • an approval for a person to provide an air traffic control service;
  • a certificate of airworthiness or a permit to fly;
  • an approval of equipment for use on board an aircraft or in the provision of an air traffic control service;
  • a maintenance engineer’s licence;
  • a pilot’s licence; or
  • any other type of licence, certificate, authorisation or approval issued by the CAA’s Safety Regulation Group

you are entitled to have the decision or proposal reviewed in accordance with Regulation 6 of the Civil Aviation Authority Regulations 1991 (Section 6 of CAP 393).

To request a review, simply write or email the CAA official who has sent you the decision or proposal clearly stating that you wish the matter to be reviewed. You will then be contacted by a CAA lawyer who will be appointed to manage the review who will be able to answer any queries about the process.

A guide to the review process is available in: Guidance on Requesting a Review of Adverse Decisions or Proposals made by CAA SRG.

The review will include a hearing which the appellant may attend.

If the applicant/holder requests a review, the decision must be made only by Members of the CAA after conducting a review. The review is conducted by a Panel of Members of the CAA who are appointed by the Secretary of State for Transport.

In the case of an appeal about fitness (of character as opposed to medical fitness) there is a right of appeal from the CAA to the County Court (or the Sheriff in Scotland).