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A new UK Government took office on 11 May. As a result the content on this site may not reflect current Government policy. All statutory guidance and legislation published on this site continues to reflect the current legal position unless indicated otherwise. To view the new Department for Education website, please go to http://www.education.gov.uk

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Internet safety

Click Clever, Click Safe

Click Clever, Click Safe: The campaign

The UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) and the DCSF have launched a public awareness campaign about internet safety, as a key delivery for the Byron recommendations.

The campaign promotes the Click Clever, Click Safe code and is aimed at parents, highlighting some common risks that their children may be exposed to when using the internet. The adverts, which will feature in national press, outdoor posters and radio during February 2010, outline the risks and explain how the code can be used to mitigate against them. To ensure the people who matter most — parents and young people — are reached effectively, the campaign is supported by a range of industry partners. 

Click Clever, Click Safe: The code

The internet opens up a world of entertainment, opportunity and knowledge. To help children and young people to enjoy it all safely, UKCCIS has developed the Click Clever, Click Safe code. This behavioural code has been designed to:

  • give parents the confidence to be able to help their children enjoy the internet safely
  • help children and young people to understand how their online experiences can expose them to risks.

The code has three simple actions: 'Zip it, Block it, Flag it'. These are easy to remember when talking to children and young people about online safety and are designed to help keep them safe on the internet — an everyday easy reminder.

  • Zip it: Keep your personal stuff private and think about what you say and do online.
  • Block it: Block people who send you nasty messages, and don't open unknown links and attachments.
  • Flag it: Flag up with someone you trust if anything upsets you or if someone asks to meet you offline.

The code is designed to be memorable and can be integrated or sit alongside many of the already existing internet-safety initiatives and resources. The code is not a lesson resource in itself.

Free code stickers, posters and leaflets

To help teachers talk to their students about the Click Clever, Click Safe code and to help them to enjoy the internet safely, DCSF has produced a range of resources which schools can order or download free of charge. Further information is available from the UKCCIS section of the DCSF website.

Progress review on children's internet safety

In December 2009, the Government announced that Professor Tanya Byron will review progress on children's internet safety since the recommendations in the 2008 Byron Review. Professor Byron began this work in January 2010 and is expected to publish her progress report by the end of March 2010. To get in touch with the review team, contact tanya.byron@dcsf.gsi.gov.uk.

Further information about internet safety

More information is available on the 'UKCCIS' section of the DCSF website. See also Becta's e-safety advice for further guidance on a range of internet safety issues for schools and parents.

Last updated: 09 February 2010

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A new UK Government took office on 11 May. As a result the content on this site may not reflect current Government policy. All statutory guidance and legislation published on this site continues to reflect the current legal position unless indicated otherwise. To view the new Department for Education website, please go to http://www.education.gov.uk