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Picture courtesy of the Olympic Delivery Authority.

 
Picture courtesy of the Olympic Delivery Authority.

PPM Profession Definition

Definition of the Government Programme and Project Management (PPM) Professional Community

Definition

The Government Programme and Project Management (PPM) Professional Community is essentially engaged in the delivery of policy and strategic business change through portfolios of often complex and high profile programmes and projects. At the heart of the professional community are the qualified and experienced portfolio, programme, and project management professionals.

In summary, the core PPM Profession comprises:
Professionals
Those who have chosen PPM as their primary profession and are appropriately qualified and experienced, whilst they may also have other professional affiliations, for example a project manager specialising in IT projects.

In addition, the PPM professional community includes:
Practitioners
. Those who are experienced and effective programme and/or project managers, although they may have few or no formal qualifications.
. Those who are developing their PPM skills and knowledge and working towards professional status. 
. This group also includes those members of other complementary professions who work effectively in a PPM delivery environment, for example, Policy or Procurement professionals.
Wider Community of Practice
Those who have, or are required to have, some PPM competences and an understanding of methodologies, and/or apply these for a time, within projects or elsewhere.

Professionals

Increasingly, PPM professionals will be affiliated to a professional body that represents the PPM profession.  They will adhere to that body"s Code of Conduct, align their professional development to an accepted and recognised qualification route and be committed to, and undertaking, Continuous Professional Development (CPD) and supporting others with their PPM professional development. Some individuals will be developing their careers within a number of professional disciplines, whilst primarily identifying themselves as PPM professionals and aligning their personal development with the PPM Competence Framework adopted by their organisations and other standards such as Professional Skills for Government (PSG).             

Practitioners

Working with the professional "core" are a larger number of practitioners in a variety of roles who, whilst perhaps not yet professionally qualified or members of a professional body, are nonetheless competent in aspects of the PPM discipline. These practitioners are vital to the successful delivery of the portfolios, programmes and projects on which they work.  Some will perform directing roles (e.g. SROs and Board Members) whilst others make a specialist contribution and their ability to work effectively in the PPM delivery environment is essential to the success of Government"s portfolio of programmes and projects. For example, this group would include Policy, IT or Procurement professionals. This group also includes those in support functions who may develop into the portfolio, programme and project professionals of the future.

Wider Community of Practice

The PPM professional community includes those whose contributions to programmes and projects are short term and/or irregular and who may not see PPM as their chosen career, but who do have a need for some project delivery skills and experience to fulfil their current or future roles. In addition, there are those who have PPM competences, qualifications and membership of a professional body, but who are not currently engaged in PPM delivery.  There are many reasons why individuals may spend a portion of their professional career away from their core discipline, and this group should be encouraged to maintain their links within the PPM professional community and to continue with PPM CPD in addition to developing other professional skills.

Although building the core group of PPM professionals is the priority, all of those identified above are of interest to the Government PPM Head of Profession as they all form part of the Government"s PPM capability and contribute towards the success of its portfolio of projects and programmes and ultimately to the delivery of Government policy and business change.  


October 2009