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Home > Safer and Stronger Communities > Violent Crime

The contents of this website are under review following the formation of a new HM Government. Current information may be found at www.gonetwork.gos.gov.uk.

Violent Crime

Violent Crime covers a wide range of offences, from homicide and serious wounding to common assault and harassment. It includes guns, gangs and knives and hate crime, as well as sexual and domestic violence. However, half of violent crime includes no injury to the victim.

The 2008/9 British Crime Survey demonstrated that police recorded violent crime, total violence against the person decreased by 6 per cent.  We have an active role in the effort to continue bringing down the level of violent crime, which has fallen by 35 per cent since its peak in 1995. 

Violence can be viewed in two contexts:

Interpersonal Violence

Violence which primarily takes place in private, often in the home, usually between individuals who have or have had a relationship with each other, this includes domestic violence and sexual violence. 

For more information on domestic violence and abuse, and sexual violence and abuse, please visit the respective web pages which can be found via the left hand side.

Public Place Violence

Violence which primarily takes place in public, often by, among or targeted at groups of people, and often committed by individuals who are strangers (or not intimately known) to each other, this includes youth and gang violence, gun and knife crime, hate crime and alcohol related violence. 

Delivery Drivers and Key Policy Areas

PSA Delivery Agreement 23: Make Communities Safer
Priority Action 1: Reduce the most serious violence, including tackling serious sexual offences and domestic violence.

PSA Delivery Agreement 25: Reduce the harm caused by alcohol and drugs

Tackling Violence Action Plan Implementation Guidance

The Tackling Violence Action Plan Implementation Guidance provides information on tools, processes and structures to assist frontline practitioners to tackle most serious violence.  It directs local practitioners to the wealth of guidance that exists for specific crime types and also partnership working within the violence context.

The guidance currently covers seven main areas which set the context of most serious violence and potential steps to tackling it:

  • the government's response to most serious violence and the Public Service Agreement (PSA)
  • the Tackling Violence Action Plan and specific actions for Community Safety Partnerships (CSPs)
  • guidelines on producing a strategic assessment and problem profile
  • producing a local action plan to set out how local partnerships will achieve their aim of tackling most serious violence
  • the structures for most serious violence strategic and tactical groups
  • information sharing including the legal position and the process for setting up data sharing arrangements
  • managing violence and sexual offenders in relation to risk assessment and risk management

Tackling Knives (Serious Youth Violence) Action Plan

The Tackling Knives Action Programme (TKAP) was launched in 2008 and is an intensive, cross-government action programme which committed to take swift action to reduce incidents of death and serious violence among teenagers.

In March 2009, the Home Office announced an extra £5 million to tackle knife crime and serious youth violence, and increase targeted police action to tackle a minority of young people who commit serious violence, regardless of the weapon involved.

Youth Crime Action Plan

The youth crime action plan is a comprehensive, cross-government analysis of what the government is going to do to tackle youth crime.

It sets out a 'triple track' approach of enforcement and punishment where behaviour is unacceptable, non-negotiable support and challenge where it is most needed, and better and earlier prevention.

It makes clear that the government will not tolerate behaviour that causes misery and suffering for innocent victims.

 

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Violent Crime in
 List item 1  East of England
 List item 2  North East
 List item 3  East Midlands
 List item 4  London
 List item 5  South West
 List item 6  West Midlands
 List item 7  North West
 
 List item 8  National

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